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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Mukta Kulkarni, K.V. Gopakumar and Shivani Patel

Organizations are increasingly investing in disability-specific sensitization workshops. Yet, there is limited understanding about their hoped outcomes, that is, increased…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations are increasingly investing in disability-specific sensitization workshops. Yet, there is limited understanding about their hoped outcomes, that is, increased knowledge about disability-related issues and behavioral changes with respect to those with a disability. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness and boundaries of disability-specific sensitization training in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an interview-based study where 33 employees from five industries across India were interviewed over the span of a year.

Findings

The findings suggest that sensitization workshops are successful with regard to awareness generation. Paradoxically, the same awareness also reinforced group boundaries through “othering.” Further, workshops resonated more so with individuals who already had some prior experience with disability, implying that voluntary sensitization is likely attracting those who have the least need of such sensitization. The findings also suggest that non-mandated interventions may not necessarily influence organizational level outcomes, especially if workshops are conducted in isolation from a broader organizational culture of inclusion.

Originality/value

The present study helps outline effects of sensitization training initiatives and enhances our understanding about how negative attitudes toward persons with a disability can be overcome. The study also indicates how such training initiatives may inadvertently lead to “othering.” Finally, this study offers suggestions to human resource managers for designing impactful disability sensitization workshops.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Shivani Mathur Gaiha, Greeshma Ann Sunil, Rajeev Kumar and Subhadra Menon

Lack of understanding around mental illness and stigma are an overwhelming barrier in help-seeking behaviour for mental health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Lack of understanding around mental illness and stigma are an overwhelming barrier in help-seeking behaviour for mental health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to examine mental health literacy and social attitudes as instrumental factors in building capacity of the demand-side to support and access mental health care at the community level in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice surveys were administered to 521 persons from the general population, distributed equally in the age range of 15-60 years. The study included 52 respondents per district from ten districts across five states in India, namely Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Delhi, Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh. The responses were collected and analysed thematically, keeping in mind the relevance of these findings as contributors to knowledge of mental health and to the construct of stigma.

Findings

Pervasive socio-cultural factors, especially stigma inhibit access to basic mental health information and care, despite knowledge that mental illness is treatable. Degrading treatment, loss of personal liberty and social exclusion, i.e. compromised human rights at the community level are widespread. Self-reported attitudes when encountering a person with mental illness show that respondents act out of fear and are guided by misinformation and myths. Extant knowledge on mental health is attributed predominantly to informal networks, as a potential resource to be strengthened.

Practical implications

Realising mental health care, including help-seeking behaviour calls for greater knowledge-sharing, sensitisation and community engagement.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study current levels of mental health literacy and underlying perceptions that contribute to the persistent treatment gap.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Abstract

Details

Application of Big Data and Business Analytics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-884-2

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Case study
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Saima Rizvi and Shivani Teckchandany

Entrepreneurship, Design thinking and innovation, Strategy, Social entrepreneurship and rural markets, Business at the base of pyramid, Sustainability and leadership.

Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship, Design thinking and innovation, Strategy, Social entrepreneurship and rural markets, Business at the base of pyramid, Sustainability and leadership.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and Post Graduate Students

Case overview

Keggfarms Private Ltd was a private company started by Mr Vinod Kapur, a social entrepreneur who wanted to create a scalable social impact with his endeavor, which was the first of its kind outside the developed world. Keggfarms was established in 1967 with the aim of creating a business model which could benefit the rural sector by generating income and also enabling nutritional self-sufficiency. The case study aims to explore the sustainable model which had survived for 48 years without a push strategy and without a sole focus on profit. The business had spread to around 19 states in India, and the enterprise had decided to replicate a similar business model in the African continent. The social enterprise had aimed to touch the lives of millions of people in poverty by providing them with a low cost chicken – Kuroiler, which could survive the harsh weather and environmental conditions of rural India.

Expected learning outcomes

The study will help students to understand how social enterprises are born and built from the vision of the founder; how social capital is generated in the economy and how a blue ocean strategy was applied in this case to build a sustainable and financially viable social entrepreneurship model.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Prashant Mahajan and Suresh Golahit

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships of service marketing mix (SMM) as service input and service output in terms of students’ performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships of service marketing mix (SMM) as service input and service output in terms of students’ performance, satisfaction and referral act in context to higher and technical education (HTE) through the application of structural equation modeling.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research, conducted through a self-administered survey composed by a closed-ended structured questionnaire, was incorporated for the students who were enrolled in the technical educational institutions situated in the Khandesh region of India.

Findings

The findings of this study revealed that traditional SMM is statistically linked with the performance of students in terms of skill and knowledge enhancement, satisfaction and referral act of students, which are perceptible new emerging SMM; performance, pleasure and pointing out in terms of service output.

Practical implications

Integrating SMM as service input and service output are productive for HTE in enhancing growth (quantitatively) by the inclusivity of diversified students and development (qualitatively) by enhancing their performance for global standing, making them satisfied and motivating them for recommending their institution to others. This integration can be utilized as a yardstick by the institutions for staying ahead in students’ market with a distinctive competitive advantage.

Social implications

Growth and development of HTE will raise a society’s quality of life and thereby increase a country’s socio-economic status.

Originality/value

The study has exhibited SMM as input and output of a service system that is useful for the growth and development of HTE. The measurement tool presented is effective in (re)framing policies on SMM as service input based on desired service output.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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