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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Shirley Jenner

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of an employee opinion survey and to evaluate its impact on the graduate training programme and associated employment…

3041

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of an employee opinion survey and to evaluate its impact on the graduate training programme and associated employment relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a detailed, longitudinal case study of one large‐scale UK organisation. The approach recognises that discursive resources have a material existence in the sense that they are embodied in the social practices of individuals and the institutions and organisations within which these social practices take place. Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data, the paper demonstrates how the design, delivery and evaluation of the graduate programme formed a learning nexus between management, graduates and other stakeholders.

Findings

The case study highlights the contested nature of organisational life, particularly in relation to matters of control and autonomy. However, improved graduate opinion survey ratings over time suggest that the evolving surveillance offered by internal research has been successful in achieving changed management behaviours. The case study has shown how graduate training, development and career management are best understood as discursive practices. Shared understandings about the nature of work are constructed though a communications nexus of key stakeholders.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to highlight the pivotal role of the corporate training programme and associated communications in the development of shared understandings of the nature of the employment relationship.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Ellis Cashmore

Abstract

Details

Kardashian Kulture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-706-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

Abstract

Details

Kardashian Kulture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-706-7

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1899

The desire to obtain authentic guidance as to the real nature, quality and value of food‐products and of other articles of necessity has grown rapidly during recent years…

Abstract

The desire to obtain authentic guidance as to the real nature, quality and value of food‐products and of other articles of necessity has grown rapidly during recent years, while the demand for amending and additional legislation, and for increased governmental and official activity, plainly indicates that general public attention to this most important of national questions is at length aroused.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

K.C. Harrison

Emphasizes the importance of old county maps to library localhistory collections. Describes the history of county map production inthe United Kingdom beginning with…

273

Abstract

Emphasizes the importance of old county maps to library local history collections. Describes the history of county map production in the United Kingdom beginning with Christopher Saxton in 1579 and proceeding through his successors to John Speed (1542‐1629). Discusses seventeenth‐and eighteenth‐century county maps and their makers covering up to Thomas Moule in the early nineteenth century. States the importance of strengthening local history map collections in libraries.

Details

Library Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Women in Management Review is split into five sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Leadership Styles and…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Women in Management Review is split into five sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Leadership Styles and Personality; Recruitment and Career Management; Dependant Care and Health/Family Issues; Job Evaluation, Appraisal and Equal Pay; Discrimination and Equal Opportunities.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1903

“WE come now to another aspect of the question, and it must be admitted that the resource and ingenuity of the opposition have left nothing unnoticed. This is the common…

Abstract

“WE come now to another aspect of the question, and it must be admitted that the resource and ingenuity of the opposition have left nothing unnoticed. This is the common and constantly repeated assertion that novels are so cheap that every working man in the country can buy all he needs for less than the annual library rate. This statement was first made some years ago when publishers commenced to issue cheap reprints of non‐copyright novels at 1s. and 6d. each. Previous to this the halfpenny evening paper had been relied upon as affording sufficient literary entertainment for the working man, but when it was found to work out at 13s. per annum, as against a library rate of 1od. or 1s. 4d., the cheap newspaper argument was dropped like a hot cinder. We doubt if the cheap paper‐covered novel is any better. Suppose a workman pays £20 per annum for his house, and is rated at £16, he will pay 1s. 4d. as library rate, or not much more than 1¼d. per month for an unlimited choice of books, newspapers and magazines. But suppose he has to depend on cheap literature. The lowest price at which he can purchase a complete novel of high quality by any author of repute is 3d., but more likely 4½d. or 6d. However, we will take 3d. as an average rate, and assume that our man has leisure to read one book every fortnight. Well, at the end of one year he will have paid 6s. 6d. for a small library by a restricted number of authors, and it will cost him an additional 4s. or 5s. if he contemplates binding his tattered array of books for future preservation. Besides this, he will be practically shut off from all the current literature on topics of the day, as his 3d. a fortnight will hardly enable him to get copyright books by the best living authors. With a Public Library at his command he can get all these, and still afford to buy an occasional poet or essayist, or novel, or technical book, well bound and printed on good paper, such as his friend who would protect him against an iniquitous library rate would not blush to see on his own shelves. It seems hard that the working men of the country should be condemned to the mental entertainment afforded by an accumulation of pamphlets. Literature clothed in such a dress as gaudy paper covers is not very inspiring or elevating, and even the most contented mind would revolt against the possession of mere reading matter in its cheapest and least durable form. The amount of variety and interest existing among cheap reprints of novels is not enough, even if the form of such books were better. It is well known to readers of wide scope that something more than mere pastime can be had out of novels. Take, for example, the splendid array of historical novels which have been written during the present century. No one can read a few of these books without consciously or unconsciously acquiring historical and political knowledge of much value. The amount of pains taken by the authors in the preparation of historical novels is enormous, and their researches extend not only to the political movements of the period, but to the geography, social state, costume, language and contemporary biography of the time. Thus it is utterly impossible for even a careless reader to escape noticing facts when presented in an environment which fixes them in the memory. For example, the average school history gives a digest of the Peninsular War, but in such brief and matter of fact terms as to scarcely leave any impression. On the other hand, certain novels by Lever and Grant, slipshod and inaccurate as they may be in many respects, give the dates and sequence of events and battles in the Peninsula in such a picturesque and detailed manner, that a better general idea is given of the history of the period than could possibly be acquired without hard study of a heavy work like Napier's History. It is hardly necessary to do more than name Scott, James, Cooper, Kingsley, Hugo, Lytton, Dumas, Ainsworth, Reade, G. Eliot, Short‐house, Blackmore, Doyle, Crockett and Weyman in support of this claim. Again, no stranger can gain an inkling of the many‐sided characteristics of the Scot, without reading the works of Scott, Ferrier, Galt, Moir, Macdonald, Black, Oliphant, Stevenson, Barrie, Crockett, Annie Swan and Ian Maclaren. And how many works by these authors can be had for 3d. each? The only way in which a stay‐at‐home Briton can hope to acquire a knowledge of the people and scenery of India is by reading the works of Kipling, Mrs. Steel, Cunningham, Meadows Taylor, and others. Probably a more vivid and memory‐haunting picture of Indian life and Indian scenery can be obtained by reading these authors than by reading laboriously through Hunter's huge gazetteer. In short, novels are to the teaching of general knowledge what illustrations are to books, or diagrams to engineers, they show things as they are and give information about all things which are beyond the reach of ordinary experience or means. It is just the same with juvenile literature, which is usually classed with fiction, and gives to that much‐maligned class a very large percentage of its turnover. The adventure stories of Ballantyne, Fenn, Mayne Reid, Henty, Kingston, Verne and others of the same class are positive mines of topographical and scientific information. Such works represent more than paste and scissors industry in connection with gazetteers, books of travel and historical works; they represent actual observation on the part of the authors. A better idea of Northern Canada can be derived from some of Ballantyne's works than from formal topographical works; while the same may be said of Mexico and South America as portrayed by Captain Mayne Reid, and the West Indies by Michael Scott. The volume of Personal Reminiscences written by R. M. Ballantyne before he died will give some idea of the labour spent in the preparation of books for the young. The life of the navy at various periods can only be learned from the books of Smollett, Marryat and James Hannay, as that of the modern army is only to be got in the works of Lever, Grant, Kipling, Jephson, “John Strange Winter” and Robert Blatchford.

Details

New Library World, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1912

THE question of the advisability of exercising a censorship over literature has been much before the public of late, and probably many librarians have realised how closely…

Abstract

THE question of the advisability of exercising a censorship over literature has been much before the public of late, and probably many librarians have realised how closely the disputed question affects their own profession.

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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