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Article

Drew Martin

This paper aims to demonstrate deep gaze using a Japanese Shinto wedding ceremony as an example. Some long-term tourists develop an intimate understanding of the host…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate deep gaze using a Japanese Shinto wedding ceremony as an example. Some long-term tourists develop an intimate understanding of the host country’s culture by gaining access to authentic experiences typically limited to the locals. These native visitors experience a deep gaze.

Design/methodology/approach

Combing subjective personal introspection (SPI) and confirmatory personal introspection (CPI), the author’s 76 wedding photographs are examined critically.

Findings

Results demonstrate how a native visitor uses SPI and CPI analyses of native gaze. While the Shinto wedding ceremony’s authenticity mixes traditional and evolutionary elements, the ceremony is best viewed as a Gestalt experience. The evidence suggests authenticity need not have deep roots in the culture.

Research limitations/implications

The findings serve as only one configuration of many possible gazes. Tourist Gaze 4.0 is a set of complex antecedent conditions and multiple configurations.

Originality/value

Using photographs taken by native family members, this paper demonstrates how SPI and CPI identify deep gaze through a different lens.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Book part

Christoffer Wanga Krag and Nina K. Prebensen

This paper explores why and how Japanese tourists travel in their home country. This work uses in-depth interviews and focus group interviews as its study design. Nature…

Abstract

This paper explores why and how Japanese tourists travel in their home country. This work uses in-depth interviews and focus group interviews as its study design. Nature is an important aspect of Japanese life, and the meaning and use of nature include spiritual and bodily purification. Furthermore, Japanese domestic nature-based travels are strongly linked to self-identity and self-presentation, in that the Japanese travel not only for the sake of enjoyment, but also to a large extent as an instrument for learning, sharing and communing. The results are discussed in terms of theoretical contributions and practical applications.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-615-4

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Book part

Mitsuru Kodama

In the current business environment of uncertainty, indeterminacy, complexity, insecurity, and ambiguity, practitioners must develop sensible judgment through their…

Abstract

In the current business environment of uncertainty, indeterminacy, complexity, insecurity, and ambiguity, practitioners must develop sensible judgment through their experience in decision-making and, guided by values and morals, they must take action based on actual circumstances. Leadership demonstrated in this way has been described as holistic leadership in this book, and the underlying thought and behavior of this leadership is practical wisdom. Practical wisdom is a concept advocated by Aristotle and its importance remains as relevant today as it was in ancient Greece. This final chapter will briefly review the sources of practical wisdom and holistic leadership discussed thus far.

Details

Developing Holistic Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-421-7

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Book part

Kate Sylvester and Brent McDonald

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how female university kendo club members participate in kendo-related hegemonic drinking in formal (heterosocial) and informal…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how female university kendo club members participate in kendo-related hegemonic drinking in formal (heterosocial) and informal (homosocial) club settings. An alternative perspective on gender relations and identity politics in Japan is outlined in this chapter by describing the significance of hegemonic drinking for female kendo club members within homosocial spaces.

Methodology – As a participant-observer, an ethnographic method was applied for an 18-month period as a quasi-member of a Japanese Sports University Kendo Club. Key to accessing the female members' lived experience was the primary author's participation in daily training and the consumption of alcohol in various kendo spaces. The data discussed in this chapter were collected via semi-structured interviews, daily self-reflexive descriptive field notes and ethnographic interviews.

Findings – Hegemonic drinking practices in heterosocial university kendo club spaces encompass networking opportunity, transference of knowledge, and fortitude building, all of which are systemized to support the advancement of male members. Although female members are relatively obscured in heterosocial spaces, women mimic and engage in hegemonic drinking practices in homosocial settings to substantiate meaning to their membership.

Research limitations/implication – Research that engages with the intersection of sport and gender needs to consider aspects of social interaction not only of the physical component of the sport but also the other day-to-day activities related to it. The examination of women and kendo-related hegemonic drinking in this chapter provides an insightful perspective and highlights the value of the ethnographic method in unexplored places of enquiry integral to researching physical cultures and body politics in Japan.

Details

Sport, Alcohol and Social Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-842-0

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Article

Although ICI Paints Aquabase waterborne basecoat for the automotive industry has received the Queen's Award for Technological Achievement (see page 6 in July issue), it is…

Abstract

Although ICI Paints Aquabase waterborne basecoat for the automotive industry has received the Queen's Award for Technological Achievement (see page 6 in July issue), it is not surprising that it is not yet being used by any company in Britain, to our knowledge. It is used on a full scale production line at General Motors truck plant in Ontario and is also used by Volvo in Sweden. We now hear that in Japan — always ready to use new technology — NOF and Shinto have signed licence agreements with ICI Paints to use Aquabase.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Book part

Kim Hyunsook Song

Fujikane (2003) indicates that there are three goals of globalization as educational imperatives. They are: (1) the intensity of interdependence in all aspects of human…

Abstract

Fujikane (2003) indicates that there are three goals of globalization as educational imperatives. They are: (1) the intensity of interdependence in all aspects of human life, (2) the changing pattern of actors on the world stage, and (3) the growing moral sense of “oneness” transcending national borders. The new worldviews behind the contemporary movements are fundamentally different from the rationalists’ perspective, which supported early educational efforts for international education (Fujikane, 2003). That perspective intended to develop national citizens who could understand, sympathize, and help others in order to create international harmony. In contrast, the revised imperatives are now embracing the idea of new world citizens who acknowledge interdependency, act independently of their own nation states, and are constructing universal morality in order to create a more just global society (Shin, 2003).

Details

Power, Voice and the Public Good: Schooling and Education in Global Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-185-5

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Article

Takatsugu Nato

The Japanese spirit, as an integration of gods indigenous to Japan (“Shinto”), Confucianism and Buddhism, seems to have formed today's economy and society in Japan, for…

Abstract

The Japanese spirit, as an integration of gods indigenous to Japan (“Shinto”), Confucianism and Buddhism, seems to have formed today's economy and society in Japan, for good or bad, just as modern societies in Europe and America were once created by the spirit of Puritanism.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part

Toshiko Morita

We wish to die peacefully in a manner suited to our values and taste. We also wish to be attended at our deathbed by people whom we love and try to find meaning in death…

Abstract

We wish to die peacefully in a manner suited to our values and taste. We also wish to be attended at our deathbed by people whom we love and try to find meaning in death. Here, I evaluate nursing of dying patients with regard to alienation of life and death from our daily living, problems concerning the judgment of death, how to die in a manner that fits the person's values and taste, and nursing for spiritual healing with traditional views of life and death, and cultural background of attending dying persons of the Japanese.

Details

Taking Life and Death Seriously - Bioethics from Japan
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-206-1

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Article

Arunoday Saha

Management practices in Japan differ from those prevalent in theWest partly because of different cultural assumptions regarding thebasic character of humanity itself…

Abstract

Management practices in Japan differ from those prevalent in the West partly because of different cultural assumptions regarding the basic character of humanity itself. Whereas opinion in Western tradition tends to favour the pessimistic assumption, Japanese tradition (as represented, particularly, by Confucianism) has always held man′s nature to be intrinsically good. Confucian ideology has been gradually absorbed into business management, and various well‐known features of Japanese management such as emphasis on personal relations, informal superior‐subordinate ties, consensus oriented decision making, and life‐time employment derive from the notion of the individual′s intrinsic virtuousness.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Yim Yu Wong and Thomas E. Maher

Warns against expecting the Japanese and Chinese to behave similarly, despite common features of their national cultures and geographical proximity. Points out that China…

Abstract

Warns against expecting the Japanese and Chinese to behave similarly, despite common features of their national cultures and geographical proximity. Points out that China follows Confucian‐based business ethics based on connections, mutual trust and under the table dealings, whereas Japan subscribes to Shinto‐based business ethics, depending on perfection, product superiority, obligation, personal honesty and self‐sacrifice. Provides a brief historical overview of each country’s cultural and political dynamics, then draws attention to some of the important differences between China and Japan – China preferring a command culture, pragmatism, centred on the family and using punishment as a means of ensuring conformity, whereas Japan prefers a consensus culture, sentimentality, has a strong sense of nationhood and relies on praise to achieve required performance. Suggests that western businesses keep this in mind if they are to conduct business successfully in either or both of these two countries.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 21 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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