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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2021

Ken Kumagai and Shin'ya Nagasawa

The study explores the influence of shopping channels on the hedonic shopping experience, contributing to subjective well-being (SWB) based on the purchased branded…

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores the influence of shopping channels on the hedonic shopping experience, contributing to subjective well-being (SWB) based on the purchased branded product. It also assesses the variations in these effects according to brand luxury. The purpose of the paper is to provide strategic suggestions for building luxury apparel distribution tactics that balance maintaining brand luxury with business growth through both physical stores and digital stores (e-retail).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on 418 samples collected in Japan, consumers' perceptions of hedonic shopping value and SWB are examined according to two channel factors, such as physical retail vs e-retail and mono-brand stores vs multi-brand stores. Additionally, the moderation effects of brand luxury are discussed.

Findings

Multi-group path analyses reveal that physical mono-brand stores contribute to hedonic shopping value. In addition, this experiential value is found to increase SWB, especially when the brand luxury level is high.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that managers should place a high level of importance on consumers' shopping experiences via physical direct retail especially in the case of a higher luxury level, even in today's highly developed digital environment.

Originality/value

The current study uniquely discusses the effects of shopping channels and experiences on SWB based on an acquired branded product, i.e., an evaluation of the outcome of shopping behavior and product acquisition. The study also reinforces the importance of physical stores suggested in previous luxury research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Kana Sugimoto and Shin’ya Nagasawa

This study answers the research question “How can businesses apply a luxury brand strategy to achieve innovation in their businesses or brands?” It aims to investigate the…

4675

Abstract

Purpose

This study answers the research question “How can businesses apply a luxury brand strategy to achieve innovation in their businesses or brands?” It aims to investigate the possibility of applying a luxury brand strategy to a wide range of business areas.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents a literature review and case studies, analyzing 16 products from a selection of 8 iconic luxury brands. A survey conducted in Japan and Europe identified which of the 8 selected luxury brands had established the strongest brand image. Principal component analysis and SPSS were used to analyze the results. Scatter diagrams are used to depict the relationship between factors and product positioning. Brands and products were selected for case study analysis, and the features were generalized to show how companies in business segments other than luxury goods could apply this model.

Findings

The results showed that most of the strategy’s features apply to companies in different business areas. While luxury brand strategies are unique, their features can be generalized to stimulate innovation in other businesses or brands.

Research limitations/implications

This study analyzed only two products under one luxury brand. Thus, the number of products is limited.

Originality/value

This study is unique because it examines how different business areas can apply the advantages of business strategy models. It illustrates the advantages of successful business strategies of luxury companies and how different companies can harness that success for future development.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 9 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Shin'ya Nagasawa

The purpose of this paper is to explain the relationships and the meaning of the customer experience management approach, which involves manufacturing and fabrication…

4764

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the relationships and the meaning of the customer experience management approach, which involves manufacturing and fabrication influenced by human kansei with respect to the management of technology (MOT).

Design/methodology/approach

Four cases of experience value creation from earlier work are presented. An interview was held with the product manager of each product or CEO of each company. According to the interview, the paper analyses experience values of four cases based on the five modules.

Findings

As a result of analyzing INAX “SATIS”, NISSAN “X‐TRAIL”, Canvas Bag by “Ichizawa Hampu” and Albirex Niigata from the viewpoint of the creation of customer experiences, it was found that each of them has high standards for all values of SENSE, FEEL, THINK, ACT and RELATE, meaning that they are like an ensemble of customer experiences. They create not only functional benefit but also customer experiences by the MOT approach.

Originality/value

This paper explains the relationships and the meaning of the customer experience management approach, which involves manufacturing and fabrication influenced by human kansei with respect to the Management of Technology (MOT) and will be of interest to those involved in that field.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Zhiqing Jiang, Shin’ya Nagasawa and Junzo Watada

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how store design influences luxury brand image building in a competitive market through the case study of two luxury fashion brands…

5446

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal how store design influences luxury brand image building in a competitive market through the case study of two luxury fashion brands – Bally and Tod's.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interview) approaches are both utilized in this research study. The authors interviewed brand managers of Bally and Tod's Japan and then conducted questionnaires to 57 consumers and six brand managers. Correspondence analysis, multidimensional analysis, and rough set theory were utilized to analyze the data obtained from questionnaires in order to draw the positioning maps of brand image and store image, calculate the distance of images between managers and consumers and derive and compare inference structure.

Findings

The “Brand Dimensions Scales” created by Aaker (1997) can enable to measure luxury brand and store image in a scientific way. The results clarify that there is a big gap between consumers’ and managers’ cognition; the architect who designs the building could be a efficient way of advertising a luxury brand and its building to the public; and location and store atmosphere should influence luxury brand image building through non-verbal communication.

Originality/value

This research study on luxury brand image building provides a way to measure brand image and assesses the impact change in brand image as well as its stores.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Jens J. Dahlgaard

511

Abstract

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park and Jens Dahlgaard

542

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 9 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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