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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Kay Greasley, Paul J. Watson and Shilpa Patel

This article aims to explore public‐public partnership issues arising when public sector organisations work together in order to deliver a new government sponsored initiative.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore public‐public partnership issues arising when public sector organisations work together in order to deliver a new government sponsored initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted for this study, employing in‐depth interviews across four UK case study sites. The rich qualitative data gathered from these interviews is analysed utilising a thematic framework.

Findings

The findings indicate that most of the participants did not feel that they were involved in a partnership and had little or no contact with their partner. The key role of inter‐personal relationships amongst individual members is emphasised.

Research limitations/implications

The findings presented represent the pilot sites utilised in a government sponsored initiative. As future public‐public partnerships develop, further research should be undertaken to explore this phenomenon and establish the generalisability of these findings.

Practical implications

The study indicates that while there are clear benefits of partnership working, achieving successful collaboration is not straightforward. Improvements need to be made to develop partnerships using both formal and informal communication methods.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the importance of the relationships between, and perceptions of, personnel at an individual level in the success of public‐public partnerships.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Kay Greasley, Paul Watson and Shilpa Patel

This paper aims to examine the impact of organisational change on public sector employees utilising the implementation of the UK Government's “Back to work” programme…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of organisational change on public sector employees utilising the implementation of the UK Government's “Back to work” programme (BTW) as a case study example. The paper seeks to explore the employee response to the changes they experience as a result of this new initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted for this study, employing in‐depth interviews across the UK. The interview strategy sought to focus on the individual experiences and perceptions of those involved in the operation of the programme.

Findings

The findings highlight how the interviewees face organisational change as part of their everyday life, with the pace of change increasing and becoming more radical. Many of these organisational changes are related to the introduction of new initiatives that require amendments to existing working practices. It was found that a lack of permanency and constant switching of initiatives, imposed by central government, could result in cynical attitudes towards a new initiative as interviewees await the newer, bigger and brighter programme.

Practical implications

The study indicates that when a new initiative is introduced this involves change which impacts on employees and there needs to be a management response to this challenge to ensure that initiatives are successful. Notably there needs to be a move from quick fix, early‐win outcomes as new programmes take time and effort.

Originality/value

The paper presents empirical evidence of the impact of change as a result of a new initiative involving public sector employees. It demonstrates how the political context driving new initiatives like the BTW programme affects employees on the “shopfloor” and emphasises the need for management to respond to this challenge.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Archana P. Voola, Ranjit Voola, Jessica Wyllie, Jamie Carlson and Srinivas Sridharan

This paper aims to investigate dynamics of food consumption practices among poor families in a developing country to advance the Food Well-being (FWB) in Poverty framework.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate dynamics of food consumption practices among poor families in a developing country to advance the Food Well-being (FWB) in Poverty framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design used semi-structured interviews with 25 women and constructivist grounded theory to explore food consumption practices of poor families in rural South India.

Findings

Poor families’ everyday interactions with food reveal the relational production of masculinities and femininities and the power hegemony that fixes men and women into an unequal status quo. Findings provides critical insights into familial arrangements in absolute poverty that are detrimental to the task of achieving FWB.

Research limitations/implications

The explanatory potential of FWB in Poverty framework is limited to a gender (women) and a specific country context (India). Future research can contextualise the framework in other developing countries and different consumer segments.

Practical implications

The FWB in Poverty framework helps identify, challenge and transform cultural norms, social structures and gendered stereotypes that perpetuate power hegemonies in poverty. Policymakers can encourage men and boys to participate in family food work, as well as recognise and remunerate women and girls for their contribution to maintaining familial units.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution to the relevant literature by identifying and addressing the absence of theoretical understanding of families, food consumption and poverty. By contextualising the FWB framework in absolute poverty, the paper generates novel understandings of fluidity and change in poor families and FWB.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Case study
Publication date: 4 November 2019

Sadia Samar Ali, Supriya Deka, Zulfiqar Ahmad, Salma Ahmed, Mansingh Jaswal and Hemaid Alsulami

Padmanabhan A. 2017 “Civilian drones and India’s regulatory response”. Moushami P. Joshi and Jennifer E. Trock (2016) “India Moving Forward with Unmanned Aircraft Systems…

Abstract

Supplementary materials

Padmanabhan A. 2017 “Civilian drones and India’s regulatory response”. Moushami P. Joshi and Jennifer E. Trock (2016) “India Moving Forward with Unmanned Aircraft Systems Regulations for Civil and Commercial Use” www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=6d596577-7a4a-4ecc-916e-83c4d37cc90c. www.indrones.com/2017/04/27/drone-industry-india/.Zeimpekis, Vasileios; Ichoua, Soumia; and Minis, Ioannis (2013), Humanitarian and Relief Logistics. Research Issues, Case Studies and Future Trends;Operations Research/Computer Sciences Interfaces Series. Springer Publications, www.springer.com/in/book/9781461470069.

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are to illustrate the concept and features of cost-effective and responsive supply chain, to explain the concept of hub and spoke and milk run methods used for delivery, to identify financial, operational and technological risks, to elaborate the importance of social dimension (behavioral dimension) in any technological change in an organization and to understand the concept of management of change in organizations.

Case overview/synopsis

The case deals with a typical challenge of periodical delivery systems, in this case specifically of The Topical, an Indian periodical. The service manager of the company, Sara Jindal, recognized a problem with customer retention. She explored the causes and found that The Topical, a 20-year-old company, was losing its popularity due to the untimely delivery of the magazines. To solve the problem Jindal, tried to gain an understanding of the operational processes and realized that there was no issue in the warehouse regarding inventory control, management or order pickup. However, she found that the magazines were parceled through book post and that there was no tracking policy in the company for the deliveries. Therefore, it was not possible to know whether the magazines got delivered on time. The matter was taken seriously and as a solution, the possibility of integrating drones into the delivery system came up.

Complexity academic level

Undergraduate and Postgraduate students.

Subject code

CSS 9: Operations and Logistics

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Case study
Publication date: 29 March 2016

Samir K. Barua and N. Balasubramanian

The game of cricket that originated in Britain thrives on passion and the following it generates in India and other South Asian countries is tremendous. The Board of…

Abstract

The game of cricket that originated in Britain thrives on passion and the following it generates in India and other South Asian countries is tremendous. The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) is the apex governing body that controls all cricketing events in the India. Being the richest such body, BCCI is the most powerful national body among similar organizations across countries where cricket is played. The world of cricket saw a sea change with the introduction of the Indian Premier League (IPL) due to its unprecedented commercial success. The case describes the betting scandal that hit IPL, BCCI and its promoter in the middle of 2013. The scandal involved the son-in-law of the President of BCCI. The events following the scandal saw the Supreme Court of India, the highest judicial body in the country, to indict BCCI and its President of serious misgovernance. Set in this backdrop, the case highlights governance issues in the functioning of not for profit organizations such as BCCI. The case provides an opportunity to reflect on and discuss as to how such quasi-public bodies ought to be governed.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Pankaj Madan

The case illustrates the social entrepreneurial journey of Ramdev who developed Patanjali Yogpeeth as a successful enterprise that provides low-cost physical and mental…

Abstract

Synopsis

The case illustrates the social entrepreneurial journey of Ramdev who developed Patanjali Yogpeeth as a successful enterprise that provides low-cost physical and mental treatment through the ancient science of yoga. The case provides a perspective on the reasons for the success of Patanjali as a social brand in such a small time scale and also addresses the controversies associated with it.

Research methodology

Using secondary sources, the study describes the philosophy, infrastructure, innovations, marketing and promotional practices of the organization. It also seeks answers to the challenges faced by the social entrepreneur to fulfill his social mission.

Relevant courses and levels

The case is best suited for courses on entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship and marketing of non-profit organization in both MBA and executive programs. Students who have an interest in starting their own venture or social enterprise will find it more relevant and interesting.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Gireesha B.J., M. Archana, B. Mahanthesh and Prasannakumara B.C.

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of binary chemical reaction and activation energy on nano Casson liquid flow past a stretched plate with non-linear…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of binary chemical reaction and activation energy on nano Casson liquid flow past a stretched plate with non-linear radiative heat, and also, the effect of a novel exponential space-dependent heat source (ESHS) aspect along with thermal-dependent heat source (THS) effect in the analysis of heat transfer in nanofluid. Comparative analysis is carried out between the flows with linear radiative heat process and non-linear radiative heat process.

Design/methodology/approach

A similarity transformation technique is utilised to access the ODEs from the governed PDEs. The manipulation of subsequent non-linear equations is carried out by a well-known numerical approach called Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg scheme. Obtained solutions are briefly discussed with the help of graphical and tabular illustrations.

Findings

The effects of various physical parameters on temperature, nanoparticles volume fraction and velocity fields within the boundary layer are discussed for two different flow situations, namely, flow with linear radiative heat and flow with non-linear radiative heat. It is found that an irregular heat source/sink (ESHS and THS) and non-linear solar radiation play a vital role in the enhancement of the temperature distributions.

Originality/value

The problem is relatively original to study the effects of activation energy and binary chemical reaction along with a novel exponential space-based heat source on laminar boundary flow past a stretched plate in the presence of non-linear Rosseland radiative heat.

Details

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1573-6105

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Io Vassiliadou, Esther Tolani, Lindsay Ip, Abigail Smith and Iliatha Papachristou Nadal

Recent models of care incorporate service user involvement within the development and sustainability of a quality improvement project. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent models of care incorporate service user involvement within the development and sustainability of a quality improvement project. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the significance of working with patients and members of the public for the integration of psychosocial care into long-term condition (LTC) management.

Design/methodology/approach

Research shows that mental health difficulties are more prevalent in people with LTC. The three Dimensions for Long-term Conditions (3DLC) is a patient-centred multidisciplinary service which integrates psychological and social care into the usual physical care. Thematic analysis was conducted on the discussions of the two patient and public involvement workshops that were facilitated by the service. The workshops included healthcare professionals, patients with LTC and their carers.

Findings

Several themes and subthemes emerged which highlighted the importance of discussing and treating mental health in a physical health setting, the challenges that both the patients and healthcare professionals encounter and the ways in which an integrated care service may address these barriers. The findings show that there was an emphasis on patient-centeredness, accessibility of services and the need for better communication.

Practical implications

People with LTC can be empowered to better self-manage their condition, whilst having access to all types of care, physical, social and psychological. By involving service users in the implementation process of the 3DLC service, the components of an effective integrated service are delineated.

Originality/value

The service users have identified barriers and facilitators of integrating a biopsychosocial model in care pathways. This has helped the 3DLC team to further develop the model to ensure improvements in condition-specific outcomes, quality of life and healthcare utilisation.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Thelma Fennie, Mokgadi Moletsane and Anita Padmanabhanunni

This study explores how menstruation is perceived, experienced and navigated by school-going adolescent girls living in low-to-middle income settings in South Africa…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores how menstruation is perceived, experienced and navigated by school-going adolescent girls living in low-to-middle income settings in South Africa. Existing research from developing countries suggest that the onset of menstruation has implications for school attendance and academic performance. There is evidence that menstrual cycle–related symptoms (primarily physical) lead to difficulties in, or interference with, and disengagement from school, social relations, and physical activities (van Iersel et al., 2016; Steiner et al., 2011; Kiesner and Pastore, 2010; Taras, 2005). The onset of menstruation can be shame-inducing and has been associated with anxiety and confusion. Few studies have been conducted on menstruation in countries with a history of sectarian violence and characterised by substantial socio-economic disparities and high levels of gender-based violence. Understanding the experiences of girls in these contexts is important in generating contextually-grounded knowledge and appropriate interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used to collect data from 48 adolescent girls aged 13–16 year-old. A total of six focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire among a purposive sampling method. Data collected were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Written parental consent was obtained for participants under 18 years old.

Findings

The findings illustrated complex psychological experiences in response to menarche and menstruation. Experiences of shame in relation to menstruation were aggravated by unsupportive responses from school teachers. Challenges such as scarcity of sanitary products were experienced as creating a barrier for girls' school attendance.

Research limitations/implications

Existing research from developing countries suggests that the onset of menstruation has implications for school attendance and academic performance. The research data includes the views of adolescent learners and their negative reactions and positive experiences towards menstruation within the school environment.

Practical implications

Given the comparative paucity of research emerging from developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa, this paper addresses an important gap in the literature by providing contextually-nuanced information about the menstrual experiences of adolescent girls. The study can further provide information for efforts made by the Department of Education and Department of Health regarding the impact of menstruation on adolescent girls' school attendance.

Social implications

This study provides important insights regarding the experiences of South African school girls in relation to menstruation. Although dominant feelings of shame, confusion and disgust may surround menstruation, the study also highlighted potential positive experiences associated with menstruation. Teachers and school administrators need to be oriented towards the needs of adolescent girls if issues regarding poor school attendance are to be addressed.

Originality/value

To reduce absenteeism in schools and ensure learners are provided with improved allocation of sanitary products in schools, there is a need for the advocacy regarding sexuality education and resources to promote the psychological health of adolescent girls.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

M. Kaladhar

The present study spotlights the single and multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) methods to determine the optimal machining conditions and the predictive modeling for…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study spotlights the single and multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) methods to determine the optimal machining conditions and the predictive modeling for surface roughness (Ra) and cutting tool flank wear (VB) while hard turning of AISI 4340 steel (35 HRC) under dry environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, Taguchi L16 design of experiments methodology was chosen. The experiments were performed under dry machining conditions using TiSiN-TiAlN nanolaminate PVD-coated cutting tool on which Taguchi and responses surface methodology (RSM) for single objective optimization and MCDM methods like the multi-objective optimization by ratio analysis (MOORA) were applied to attain optimal set of machining parameters. The predictive models for each response and multiresponse were developed using RSM-based regression analysis. S/N ratios, analysis of variance (ANOVA), Pareto diagram, Tukey's HSD test were carried out on experimental data for profound analysis.

Findings

Optimal set of machining parameters were obtained as cutting speed: at 180 m/min., feed rate: 0.05 mm/rev., and depth of cut: 0.15 mm; cutting speed: 145 m/min., feed rate: 0.20 mm/rev. and depth of cut: 0.1 mm for Ra and VB, respectively. ANOVA showed feed rate (96.97%) and cutting speed (58.9%) are dominant factors for Ra and VB, respectively. A remarkable improvement observed in Ra (64.05%) and VB (69.94%) after conducting confirmation tests. The results obtained through the MOORA method showed the optimal set of machining parameters (cutting speed = 180 m/min, feed rate = 0.15 mm/rev and depth of cut = 0.25 mm) for minimizing the Ra and VB.

Originality/value

This work contributes to realistic application for manufacturing industries those dealing with AISI 4340 steel of 35 HRC. The research contribution of present work including the predictive models will provide some useful guidelines in the field of manufacturing, in particular, manufacturing of gear shafts for power transmission, turbine shafts, fasteners, etc.

Details

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1573-6105

Keywords

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