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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Shikha Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore leadership capability for driving value co-creation in health-care service innovation. The leadership theories…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore leadership capability for driving value co-creation in health-care service innovation. The leadership theories developed for leading within organization boundaries can no longer apply when customers and multiple participants are collaborating for innovative services. This study uses the dynamic capability theory to identify leadership capability that supports value co-creation in health-care service innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies of Australian mental health organizations are used to identify co-creational leadership capability. These organizations have successfully embedded co-creational leadership capability in organizational systems and structure as the dynamic capability.

Findings

The study is among the first one to identify the leadership capability from a service-dominant logic perspective. Drawing from dynamic capability theory, six characteristics of co-creational leadership capability are identified, namely, creating a combined world view, creating a shared vision, facilitating an environment of trust, facilitating knowledge creation and knowledge sharing, empowering choice and facilitating collaboration.

Originality/value

This research has extended the leadership and the value co-creation literature by identifying co-creational leadership capability to drive value co-creation agenda for improving organizational results and performance.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Shikha Sharma, Jodie Conduit and Sally Rao Hill

This study aims to provide an understanding of how the participation of vulnerable customers in the co-creation of health-care provision influences their individual…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide an understanding of how the participation of vulnerable customers in the co-creation of health-care provision influences their individual well-being outcomes. Using self-determination theory, it demonstrates that co-creation at the point of care and at an organisational or system level impacts individual hedonic and eudaimonic well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is adopted to identify the various customer well-being outcomes. Two case studies of health-care organisations, comprising ten in-depth interviews and eight focus groups, as well as documents and noted observations are used for thematic analysis.

Findings

The study demonstrates ways in which vulnerable customers integrate resources to co-create value outcomes. It shows how differing co-creative role of customers with mental illness lead to different customer well-being outcomes. These roles manifest not only the hedonic well-being characteristics of pleasure and happiness but also eudaimonic well-being, which provides a sense of achievement and purpose to customers. The study used self-determination theory to identify different forms of eudaimonic well-being derived from the co-creation roles of co-producer, strategic partner and community citizen.

Originality/value

The co-creation and transformative service literature is extended by demonstrating that a feeling of self-efficacy and self-determination because of value co-creation foster customer well-being. This study demonstrates that co-creation at the point of care and at an organisational or system level impacts individual hedonic and eudaimonic well-being.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Shikha Sharma, Divya Pandey and Madhoolika Agrawal

Varanasi, an ancient city has witnessed the conversion of forest into agricultural lands. The high urbanization rate along with affluent lifestyle is adding another…

Abstract

Purpose

Varanasi, an ancient city has witnessed the conversion of forest into agricultural lands. The high urbanization rate along with affluent lifestyle is adding another category of land use, i.e. landfill. Such land use changes significantly affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from soil thus contributing to global warming. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the global warming potential (GWP) of the three land uses in Varanasi city taking into consideration CH4 and CO2.The paper also highlights the land use pattern of Varanasi.

Design/methodology/approach

Sites representing land uses under forest, agriculture and landfill were identified in and around the city and measurements of GHG fluxes were conducted periodically using closed static chambers. The GWP from each land use was calculated using the standard formula of IPCC (2007).

Findings

Landfill was found to be the land use with the highest GWP followed by agriculture. GWP from forest was negative. The study indicated that conversion of natural ecosystems into man made ecosystems contributed significantly to GHGs emissions.

Research limitations/implications

The present research is a seasonal study with inherent uncertainties. To reduce the uncertainties long-term monitoring covering wider spatial area is required.

Practical implications

The sustainable use of land along with the increment of forest cover will not only reduce the contribution in GHGs emission, but will also increase the carbon sequestrations thus limiting the implication of climate change.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind comparing the soil borne emissions from three different land uses in a rapidly urbanizing ancient city, suggesting if there is rapid conversion of forested land into other two land uses there will be considerable increase in global warming. No similar studies could be found in the literature.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Gender Equity in the Boardroom: The Case of India
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-764-8

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Ranjan Kumar, Neerja Pande and Shamama Afreen

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine sustainability reporting (SR) practices of top 10 Indian banks, on parameters derived from a Global Reporting Initiative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine sustainability reporting (SR) practices of top 10 Indian banks, on parameters derived from a Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)-G4-based persuasive communication framework.

Design/methodology/approach

SR metrics from GRI-G4 guidelines were mapped to persuasive communication parameters to develop a blended analytical framework. Content analysis (CA) technique was used to assess SR of top 10 banks on this framework.

Findings

The study has three key findings. First, most of the top 10 Indian banks are yet to adopt adequate disclosure and transparency practices in SR. Second, even though environmental and social goals are broadly reported, there are glaring omissions on metrics like “equal remuneration,” “occupational health and safety” and “customer privacy.” Third, stakeholder engagement focus is weak as reflected in low persuasive appeal of SR content of most banks.

Research limitations/implications

The blended framework provides a theoretical and analytical pathway for operationalizing the sustainability context principle, which has been inadequately addressed even within the GRI framework implementation.

Practical implications

The paper provides a “health check” and identifies “red flags” in SR of top 10 Indian banks, enabling them to undertake a critical review of their sustainability metrics and reporting practices.

Social implications

The paper establishes the significance of evaluating non-financial reporting practices addressing broader sustainability metrics in the banking sector, in an emerging economy context.

Originality/value

This paper develops a GRI-G4-based persuasive communication framework for SR assessment, and conducts an evaluation of top 10 Indian banks using CA technique.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Jared Hoppenfeld and Elizabeth Malafi

– The purpose of this paper is to explore how academic and public libraries support entrepreneurial researchers and, in doing so, demonstrate impact and share best practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how academic and public libraries support entrepreneurial researchers and, in doing so, demonstrate impact and share best practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors discuss their own experiences as academic and public business librarians who support entrepreneurs. They do so by revealing the main services they provide to this unique user group and presenting examples from their own institutions. They also present what is done at other libraries by way of a literature review and an informal survey.

Findings

After navigating the landscape of business librarian support of entrepreneurs, many commonalities were found among the types of support offered. Most libraries in this study collaborate with a business incubator, center for entrepreneurship, office of economic development or small business development center in some fashion. Numerous outreach and networking efforts were found that had positive effects on the local and national economies. Although public and academic libraries have different base user groups, both types of libraries serve current and potential entrepreneurs, as well as students, who are looking for similar data in the same kinds of resources.

Originality/value

Although specific examples can be found in the literature, little has been published that provides an overview of the entrepreneurial services and resources provided at numerous libraries of different types as well as resulting impact. This paper fills this gap and should provide new ideas to librarians of all kinds wishing to reach entrepreneurs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Case study
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Bala Bhaskaran

After a successful discussion and analysis of the case, the participants will be able to distinguish and appreciate the situations of conflict of interest (COI)…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After a successful discussion and analysis of the case, the participants will be able to distinguish and appreciate the situations of conflict of interest (COI), whistle-blowing, etc. Initiate appropriate methods to avoid/minimize the impact of COI and ensure justice and fair-play to all stake-holders. Identify and appreciate the work-context of each executive-position and initiate standard operating procedures to protect the interests of the enterprise and all its stakeholders. Appreciate the relevance of whistle-blowing and to initiate appropriate methods to ensure justice and fair-play to all stake-holders.

Case overview/synopsis

In the context of the Industrial Credit and Investment Corporation of India (ICICI)-bank, the systemic inadequacies seemed to have failed in preventing the incidences of COI. The organization was too centralized to be able to respond proactively to the allegations. The case lays bare the inadequacy of professionalism among the media in responding promptly to such instances. The case generalizes that, with increasing globalization, such incidences have global ramifications and the organizations face much greater risks than ever. The case concludes that to emerge as a mature and leading organization in the global market, ICICI-bank needed to strengthen various aspects of corporate governance; similarly to emerge as a developed economy, India needed to develop independent watchdogs to monitor the activities of corporations continuously. Media needed to be independent and mature to fulfil its duty of continuous and transparent communication to the public.

Complexity academic level

The case can be understood and analysed by management students in the post-graduate level or by working executives with at least four to five years of experience in the corporate sector.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Sunaina Kanojia, Shikha Sachdeva and Jai Prakash Sharma

This paper attempts to find the essence of whistleblowing in organizational structures, to reflect on whistleblowing mechanism and the perception of whistleblowing in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to find the essence of whistleblowing in organizational structures, to reflect on whistleblowing mechanism and the perception of whistleblowing in the working class of a country. Whistleblowing is exhibited as one of the quintessential elements of corporate governance to prevent or detect inundating corporate frauds. This study examines the whistleblowing intentions and its precursors with the knowledge of repercussions, in context of Indian employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data has been analysed herein using a structured questionnaire from 396 Indian employees of public and private sector companies of India using, multiple regression analysis.

Findings

It provides evidence that personal factors like organizational commitment, locus of control impact whistleblowing intentions vary by the type of fraud the employee encounters. The study presents a case for variation of considerable extent in non-financial fraud and financial fraud. Further, the kind of organization the employee is working in is an essential antecedent for whistleblowing behaviour of an employee. It highlights higher the perceived power or status held by the wrongdoer; higher would be an employee’s intentions to blow the whistle against him.

Practical implications

It would help managers in developing an environment which would encourage the employees by creating a self-check mechanism in the organization for improved conduct and better corporate governance. The shreds of evidence show that locus of control plays a vital role in moderating the impact of other antecedents on whistleblowing intentions of the employees.

Originality/value

Organization’s expectation from the employees to blow the whistle against wrong doing also makes the organization responsible for protecting the employee from the retaliation, which could follow after the act of whistleblowing. Also, prompts for imbibing ethical conduct throughout the organizational hierarchy.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 11 April 2020

Shikha Singh and Shweta Mittal

The case helps to understand: the working mechanisms of a digitized salon service, with a focus on the lower- and middle-income strata. The changing scenario of the…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case helps to understand: the working mechanisms of a digitized salon service, with a focus on the lower- and middle-income strata. The changing scenario of the service marketing model, with the growth in digital service models. To investigate the organisational challenges of a digitally facilitated/based start-up and find solutions to overcome the challenges.

Case overview/synopsis

“Yes Madam”-salon at home was a business enterprise, providing beauty and wellness services at the doorstep through a mobile application and web-based platform. The case describes the reason for opening the doorstep beauty services, its revenue model and aims to provide quality services to lower- and middle-income strata. The case will help students to understand the working mechanism of digitized salon services and associated challenges; prominent ones being attracting, selecting and retaining the beauticians and providing the standardised services. The case has examined the low-price services for the consumers delivered by the company. The case also discussed their plans for diversification and penetration into the untapped markets.

Complexity academic level

Graduates and postgraduates.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Puneet Dubblish and Shikha Bhatia

Learning outcomes of this paper are to analyse, record and classify financial transactions; prepare unadjusted trial balance; record the adjustment and closing entries and…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes of this paper are to analyse, record and classify financial transactions; prepare unadjusted trial balance; record the adjustment and closing entries and prepare post-closing trial balance; and prepare financial statements.

Case overview/synopsis

The case aims to induce users to draw up financial statements from the details provided. The complete accounting process is covered through solving the case. The case follows a start-up company from its first set of financial transactions to preparing the first set of financial statements. The case will help in application of accounting concepts, principles and the processes for recording transactions and preparation of financial statements.

Complexity academic level

The case is best suited for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level students of management/business schools in the courses of introductory financial accounting, intermediate accounting and financial reporting.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 1: accounting and finance.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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