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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Shih-chuan Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explore undergraduate students’ use of mobile apps to search library catalogs and analyze the problems students encountered. Student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore undergraduate students’ use of mobile apps to search library catalogs and analyze the problems students encountered. Student opinions and suggestions regarding mobile library apps were also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 16 undergraduates were observed and subjected to semi-structured interviews. Four tasks were assigned, and the participants used mobile apps and laptops to search library catalogs. Follow-up in-depth interviews were conducted to gather participants’ opinions regarding the mobile library app.

Findings

Among the 64 total searches conducted by the 16 participants, 45 (70.31 percent) were completed when using the mobile app, and 51 (79.69 percent) were completed using the laptop. Participants spent less time completing the tasks when they used the mobile app. Mobile apps are thus an effective tool for searching library catalogs. However, the interviews revealed that none of the participants had used mobile library apps prior to the interviews conducted in this study, and half of the participants expressed that they would not install library apps on their smartphones in the future.

Originality/value

The study findings may help university libraries improve their understanding about undergraduates’ search behavior and opinions about mobile library apps.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Shih-Chuan Chen

This paper aims to investigate the effect of cancer patients’ information behaviour on their decision-making at the diagnosis and treatment stages of their cancer journey…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of cancer patients’ information behaviour on their decision-making at the diagnosis and treatment stages of their cancer journey. Patients’ information sources and their decision-making approaches were analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 participants.

Findings

The cancer patients sought information from various sources in choosing a hospital, physician, treatment method, diet and alternative therapy. Physicians were the primary information source. The patients’ approaches to treatment decision-making were diverse. An informed approach was adopted by nine patients, a paternalistic approach by four and a shared decision-making approach by only two.

Practical implications

In practice, the findings may assist hospitals and medical professionals in fostering pertinent interactions with patients.

Originality/value

The findings can enhance researcher understanding regarding the effect of cancer patients’ information behaviour on their decision-making.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Shih-Chuan Chen

This study aims to explore the information-seeking behavior of female patients engaged in doctor shopping. An investigation was conducted on the following aspects: the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the information-seeking behavior of female patients engaged in doctor shopping. An investigation was conducted on the following aspects: the reasons for doctor-shopping behavior (DSB), patients’ information needs and sources, patients’ use of the obtained information and the degree of satisfaction with the information collected.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted in this study. In total, 30 female participants who lived or worked in the Taipei metropolitan area, Taiwan, were recruited.

Findings

Dissatisfaction with treatment, confirmation of illness conditions, inconvenient treatment locations and hours and dissatisfaction with doctor’s attitude were the main reasons for DSB. Family members, friends, the internet and mass media were sources of information for participants when they sought second and successive doctors. In most cases, the degree of satisfaction toward the obtained information increased after each visit to a doctor during the doctor-shopping journey. However, not all participants shared information with doctors. The participants suggested that detailed explanations provided by doctors and better communication with doctors may reduce the occurrence of doctor shopping.

Originality/value

The findings of this study help medical personnel better understand DSB. The findings revealed the significance of information to patients and indicated that the information collected during doctor shopping is beneficial for patients.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Shih-Chuan Chen

This study aims to examine the types of documents that humanities scholars use in their publications, how humanities scholars use electronic resources during their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the types of documents that humanities scholars use in their publications, how humanities scholars use electronic resources during their research, and their opinions are regarding their library’s acquisition policy for electronic and printed resources.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 13 university faculty members from the fields of Chinese literature, history and philosophy participated in this study. The documents cited in their publications were analyzed and in-depth interviews were conducted.

Findings

The results showed that books were the dominant document type cited by the participants. They frequently used electronic resources during the stages of idea generation; document search and collection; and interpretation and writing. If they used an ancient book in an electronic format, they cross-checked it with its printed version to verify the accuracy of the text. Although the participants anticipated that the university library would favour e-journals instead of printed journals, they expected the university library to continue purchasing printed books.

Originality/value

Many university libraries encounter difficulties in choosing between materials in electronic and printed formats, particularly in the humanities field. The study findings provide a clear understanding of how humanities scholars use electronic resources in the digital age.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Ming-der Wu and Shih-chuan Chen

The purpose of this study is to examine how graduate students perceive and use Google Scholar. Google Scholar has provided a convenient alternative for finding scholarly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how graduate students perceive and use Google Scholar. Google Scholar has provided a convenient alternative for finding scholarly documents since its inception in 2004 and has become a favoured tool for numerous academics. Knowledge of patrons’ usage patterns and attitudes towards Google Scholar will assist librarians in designing appropriate instruction programmes to improve students’ research abilities.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, 32 graduate students from the National Taiwan University were interviewed whose fields of study are the humanities (10), social sciences (11) and science and technology (11).

Findings

Students prefer the usability of Google Scholar over library databases. However, they appreciate the quality of documents retrieved from library databases and regard these databases as crucial tools for finding scholarly documents. Science and technology students favoured Google Scholar more than those who study the humanities and social sciences.

Research limitations/implications

This study only examines the perceptions and behaviour of graduate students. Future studies should include undergraduate students to investigate their use of Google Scholar, thereby obtaining a comprehensive understanding of various patrons of university libraries.

Practical implications

This study shows that graduate students appreciate and use Google Scholar to find scholarly documents, although some students experience difficulties. The findings of this study may assist university libraries in improving their instruction programmes.

Originality/value

The majority of previous studies have focused on coverage, quality and retrieval performance of Google Scholar. However, this study evaluates Google Scholar from a user’s perspective.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Ming‐der Wu and Shih‐chuan Chen

University libraries are increasing their e‐book collections. The purpose of this study is to investigate graduate students' usage of and attitudes towards e‐books at…

Abstract

Purpose

University libraries are increasing their e‐book collections. The purpose of this study is to investigate graduate students' usage of and attitudes towards e‐books at National Taiwan University.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 graduate students from the fields of humanities, social sciences, science and technology, and medicine were interviewed.

Findings

The results indicated that graduate students used e‐books mainly for the purposes of study and research. Monographs were the type of e‐book that students used most often, followed by textbooks and reference tools. While they appreciated the convenience of using e‐books, students mentioned several limitations. They liked the keyword search function of e‐books. Most of the time, graduate students browsed a few paragraphs or pages online and then printed out copies for further reading. They also borrowed the corresponding paper versions of the e‐books from the library. Students preferred that university libraries supply both the electronic and paper versions. In certain aspects, students' use behaviour was found to vary among disciplines.

Originality/value

This study highlights multiple aspects of graduate students' use behaviour with respect to e‐books. The findings could be used to enhance e‐book collection development in university libraries.

Details

Program, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Ming‐der Wu and Shih‐chuan Chen

This study aims to answer the following questions about humanities graduate students: what are the characteristics of the documents cited in their theses? Where and how do…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to answer the following questions about humanities graduate students: what are the characteristics of the documents cited in their theses? Where and how do they obtain those citations? Do students use and cite electronic resources? Do students favour electronic resources over paper versions?

Design/methodology/approach

The study's participants were 20 humanities graduate students. Following an analysis of the citations in their theses, list‐checking and follow‐up interviews were conducted.

Findings

The results showed that these humanities graduate students cited considerably more print materials than electronic resources. Most of the documents cited were supplied by the university library. Only a small proportion of the documents were available in electronic format either from the university library or from the internet. The availability ratio of journals was higher than that of books. Students' acceptance of e‐journals was higher than that of e‐books.

Originality/value

The findings of the study could help researchers and librarians gain a better understanding of how humanities graduate students use electronic resources.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Ming‐der Wu and Shih‐chuan Chen

This study aims to investigate graduate student perceptions of electronic resources, their search behaviour, and their usage patterns.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate graduate student perceptions of electronic resources, their search behaviour, and their usage patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted in a research‐oriented university, and participants included 18 graduate students from three disciplines: humanities, social sciences, and science and technology.

Findings

Graduate students are frequent users of electronic resources, particularly during the thesis‐writing period. Graduate students of science and technology perceive electronic resources to be considerably more important to their research and studies than students of other disciplines do. Few students use the metasearch tool to retrieve heterogeneous electronic resources in the library. Very few students use alert services to obtain updated information.

Originality/value

The findings of the study could help university librarians acquire an enhanced understanding of the usage behaviour of graduate students on electronic resources.

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Shih-chuan Chen

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse the information needs of family caregivers of cancer patients. Information sources used by the caregivers were also examined.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the information needs of family caregivers of cancer patients. Information sources used by the caregivers were also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

We interviewed 15 family caregivers (nine females, six males) in Taiwan for this study. The participants were aged from 23 to 67 years, and all except two had attained college or higher degrees. Their relationships with patients included spousal, parental, and that of son or daughter.

Findings

Family caregivers’ information needs varied along the cancer journey, and they used various information sources to satisfy these needs. Demographic variables affected the information-seeking behaviour of the family caregivers.

Originality/value

The majority of studies on this topic have been based in western countries. This paper reveals the importance of considering cultural factors. The findings can assist researchers in gaining a greater understanding of the information-seeking behaviour of family caregivers of cancer patients worldwide.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 66 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Ming‐der Wu and Shih‐chuan Chen

Studies have shown that schoolteachers are familiar with instructional materials on the web and integrate them into classroom teaching. In Taiwan, there are a number of…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies have shown that schoolteachers are familiar with instructional materials on the web and integrate them into classroom teaching. In Taiwan, there are a number of online instructional materials, with the Learning Fueling Station being a leading web site. Using this popular site as an example, this study seeks to investigate how schoolteachers navigate online instructional materials and for what types of instructional materials they are looking.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 30 elementary schoolteachers were interviewed in their offices using computers to connect to the Learning Fueling Station web site, and web pages were visited as needed during the interview. Participants were asked to search for any topic in which they were interested, and the interviewer observed and recorded their search behavior.

Findings

All schoolteachers reported that they use the internet prior to designing their instructional activities. The two main reasons they gave for using the internet were to refer to other teachers' materials and to obtain up‐to‐date information on their subjects, especially in areas related to science and technology and social studies. Source materials (e.g. photographs and video clips) and ready‐to‐use instructional packages were two popular items that the schoolteachers search for online. Participants appreciated Learning Fueling Station's commitment to quality but reported that the quantity of information available on the site was insufficient to meet their needs.

Originality/value

Relatively few studies have dealt with issues concerning teachers' use behavior. The findings of the study could be helpful for those who are responsible for organizing or maintaining instructional materials web sites on the internet. School librarians may have a better understanding of teachers' behavior and work out a more useful library instruction program.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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