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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Sherein H. Abou- Warda

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between the four main kinds of business schools in Egypt (private; internationally affiliated; public with local…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between the four main kinds of business schools in Egypt (private; internationally affiliated; public with local programs; and public with international programs) in terms of perceptions of entrepreneurial orientation (EO).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered 212 with a response rate of 55.1 percent from a sample of academics in the four groups of business schools (private; internationally affiliated; public with local programs; and public with international programs) using self-administered questionnaires. Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis were conducted to check EO, construct validity and to identify meaningful factors. MANOVA was performed by using factors identified in the previous step to establish whether any significant differences exist between the four groups.

Findings

The results show that differences between the four groups exist in terms of four sub-constructs of EO (research mobilization, unconventionality activities, industry collaboration, and perception of university policies) which successfully predict business school involvement in accreditation and commercialization setting.

Practical implications

It is meaningful to conduct a comparative study of EO; the results of this study may be broadly applied to higher education (HE) systems in other countries where strong entrepreneurship has contribute to building a more solid economy.

Originality/value

The recent literature has put little effort in understanding the effects of cultural differences among universities and its departments in terms of EO and none in identifying the differences between HE systems on the same topic.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Sherein H. Abou- Warda

– This study aims to explore the relation between barriers and project sustainability by adding competencies in the mediating role.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relation between barriers and project sustainability by adding competencies in the mediating role.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a mediation model including project sustainability as the dependent variable, sustainability barriers as the independent variable and project managers' sustainability competencies as the mediator variable. Data were gathered from project managers, executive teams, and experts/advisors, working in Egyptian higher education enhancement projects (HEEPs) using self-administered questionnaires; the total number collected was 159, representing a response rate of 93.5 percent. Correlations and multiple regression analysis were employed to analyze the mediation impact of project manager's sustainability competencies.

Findings

The results indicate that sustainability competencies mediate the relation between barriers to sustainability and project sustainability. Sustainability competencies facilitate project achievements, and the sustainability and future expansion of these achievements. The analysis suggests that “continuous competencies” are extremely important, more so than “self-competencies”.

Research limitations/implications

This study was undertaken at the level of the projects management unit in the Egyptian Ministry of Higher Education, which manages the HEEPs.

Practical implications

The analysis helps to understand the complex and nuanced nature of the projects; these are distinguished when the author considers the different practices.

Originality/value

This study offers two principal contributions: first, a guideline for the development, measurement, and application of an uncommon concept of project sustainability; second, a concept of project managers' sustainability competencies and barriers to sustainability.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Sherein Hamed Abou- Warda

The overall objective of the current study is to explore how universities can better developing new educational services. The purpose of this paper is to develop framework…

Abstract

Purpose

The overall objective of the current study is to explore how universities can better developing new educational services. The purpose of this paper is to develop framework for technology entrepreneurship education (TEPE) within universities.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed. This study passes through four phase: reviewing of good practices; a survey of academics (n=150 respondents); semi-structured interviews with leaders of Ministry of Higher Education, the Social Fund for Development, and the ILO Sub-regional Office (n=30 respondents); and two workshop with expert group and stakeholders (n=65 respondents).

Findings

This study developed framework for TEPE within universities from three aspects (center for innovation and entrepreneurship (CIE), technology entrepreneurship professors/educators, and technology entrepreneurship programs/courses).

Research limitations/implications

TEPE will have an impact at the individual and enterprise. It prepares students to be responsible, enterprising individuals who become entrepreneurs, enhances life skills and life learning experiences and contributes to economic development and sustainable communities; at the enterprise level, this education is expected to create and operate a new venture, help innovation, enhance the level of competitiveness, and develop a more practical entrepreneurial environment.

Practical implications

It is important for practitioners and policy makers to gain insights on how academic entrepreneurship support works elsewhere as inspiration for the further development of their approaches.

Social implications

TEPE can assist in obtaining higher economic growth and sustainable development, in keeping up with the fast pace of an open-market capitalist society and in promoting self-employment and training, which all lead to the reduction of unemployment.

Originality/value

This study offers three principal contributions: first, development of framework for the TEPE from all perspectives within universities as TEPE differentiates from other entrepreneurship education types; second, development of an uncommon concept of new educational services in the marketing literature that is incoherent and lacks theoretical models that reflect good practice of entrepreneurship education; third, identification best practices of TEPE in universities by reviewing and analyzing policy and continuing to experiment.

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