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1 – 10 of 15
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Fiona Aspinal, Martin Stevens, Jill Manthorpe, John Woolham, Kritika Samsi, Kate Baxter, Shereen Hussein and Mohamed Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from one element of a study exploring the relationship between personalisation, in the form of personal budgets (PBs) for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from one element of a study exploring the relationship between personalisation, in the form of personal budgets (PBs) for publicly funded social care and safeguarding.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 people receiving PBs who had recently been the focus of a safeguarding investigation. Participants were recruited from two English local authority areas and data were subject to thematic analysis.

Findings

The analysis identified three main themes: levels of information and awareness; safeguarding concerns and processes; and choice and control. Many of the participants in this small study described having experienced multiple forms of abuse or neglect concurrently or repeatedly over time.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small scale, qualitative study, taking place in two local authorities. The small number of participants may have had strong opinions which may or may not have been typical. However, the study provides some rich data on people’s experiences.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that adults receiving PBs may need information on an ongoing and repeated basis together with advice on how to identify and address poor quality care that they are arranging for themselves. Practitioners need to be aware of the influence of the level of information received and the interaction of organisational or legal requirements when responding to safeguarding concerns when care being supplied tries to reflect the benefits of choice and control.

Originality/value

This paper reports original research asking adults with care and support needs about the interaction between two key policies of safeguarding and personalisation.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2018

Martin Stevens, Jo Moriarty, Jess Harris, Jill Manthorpe, Shereen Hussein and Michelle Cornes

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of personalisation policy on the providers of social care services in England, mainly to older people, within the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of personalisation policy on the providers of social care services in England, mainly to older people, within the context of austerity and different conceptions of personalisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on part of a longitudinal study of the care workforce, which involved 188 interviews with managers and staff, undertaken in two rounds.

Findings

Four themes were identified: changing understandings and awareness of personalisation; adapting services to fit new requirements; differences in contracting; and the impact on business viability.

Research limitations/implications

The paper reflects a second look at the data focussing on a particular theme, which was not the focus of the research study. Furthermore, the data were gathered from self-selecting participants working in services in four contrasting areas, rather than a representative sample.

Practical implications

The research raises questions about the impact of a commercial model of “personalised care”, involving personal budgets (PBs) and spot contracts, on the stability of social care markets. Without a pluralistic, well-funded and vibrant social care market, it is hard to increase the consumer choice of services from a range of possible providers and, therefore, fulfil the government’s purposes for personalisation, particularly in a context of falling revenues from local authorities.

Originality/value

The research presents an analysis of interviews with care providers and care workers mainly working with older people. Their views on personalisation have not often been considered in contrast to the sizeable literature on PBs recipients and social workers.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Shereen Hussein, Jill Manthorpe and Mohamed Ismail

The aim of this paper is to explore the effect of ethnicity and separate this from the other dynamics associated with migration among members of the long-term care…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the effect of ethnicity and separate this from the other dynamics associated with migration among members of the long-term care workforce in England focusing on the nature and structure of their jobs. The analysis examines interactions between ethnicity, gender, and age, and their relations with “meso” factors related to job and organizational characteristics and “macro” level factors related to local area characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses new national workforce data, the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care (NMDS-SC), n=357,869. The paper employs descriptive statistical analysis and a set of logistic regression models.

Findings

The results indicate that labour participation of British black and minority ethnic (BME) groups in long-term care work is much lower than previously believed. There are variations in nature of work and possibly job security by ethnicity.

Research limitations/implications

While the national sample is large, the data were not purposively collected to examine differentials in reasons to work in the care sector by different ethnicity.

Practical implications

The analysis highlights the potential to actively promote social care work among British BME groups to meet workforce shortages, especially at a time where immigration policies are restricting the recruitment of non-European Economic Area nationals.

Originality/value

The analysis provides a unique insight into the participation of British BME workers in the long-term care sector, separate from that of migrant workers.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Shereen Hussein and Jill Manthorpe

The life expectancy of people with learning disabilities has increased substantially. Services for older people with learning disabilities are provided by various sectors…

Abstract

The life expectancy of people with learning disabilities has increased substantially. Services for older people with learning disabilities are provided by various sectors and practitioners (generic health and social care, or specialist learning disability or old age). The literature suggests that practitioners do not feel well‐equipped to support people with learning disabilities as they grow older, and older people's services do not always have the opportunity to share experiences and skills. This paper highlights areas such as dementia support, where the intersection between services is not clear, and explores what might help practitioners to meet the needs of people with learning disabilities as they grow older.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

David Reid, Bridget Penhale, Jill Manthorpe, Neil Perkins, Lisa Pinkney and Shereen Hussein

Little is known about the relationship between organisations charged with the protection of vulnerable adults in England and Wales. This paper investigates adult…

Abstract

Little is known about the relationship between organisations charged with the protection of vulnerable adults in England and Wales. This paper investigates adult protection1 inter‐agency relationships in the context of an adult protection framework that gave local authorities the lead role and charged other agencies with working in partnership with them. The data reported are from focus groups undertaken with members of 26 Adult Protection Committees (APCs) from England and Wales during 2005‐2006. The APCs were selected using a stratified sampling frame and 271 professionals participated. Analysis revealed that participation in the local strategic decision‐making setting of the APC was influenced by the local history of partnership working, information‐sharing, affective relationships, understanding of respective roles and a shared acknowledgement of the importance of adult protection. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of government reviews of local discretion around adult protection systems.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2007

Neil Perkins, Bridget Penhale, David Reid, Lisa Pinkney, Shereen Hussein and Jill Manthorpe

This article examines the effectiveness of the multi‐agency approach in adult protection and draws on findings from research that examined the effectiveness of both…

1445

Abstract

This article examines the effectiveness of the multi‐agency approach in adult protection and draws on findings from research that examined the effectiveness of both partnership working and perceptions of the regulatory framework to protect vulnerable adults. The research findings were collected through the use of a survey of all local councils with social services responsibilities in England and Wales. Examples of good practice in partnership working were found. However, resource pressures, insufficient information sharing and a lack of clarity about roles and responsibilities were reported to hinder a multi‐agency approach.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Joan Rapaport, Martin Stevens, Jill Manthorpe, Shereen Hussein, Jess Harris and Stephen Martineau

This article describes research investigating the steps involved in recommending to the Secretary of State for Health whether a care worker should be included on the…

Abstract

This article describes research investigating the steps involved in recommending to the Secretary of State for Health whether a care worker should be included on the Protection of Vulnerable Adults (POVA) list, which records individuals barred from working and volunteering with vulnerable adults in England and Wales.The aims of the study were to investigate patterns of referrals to the list; factors associated with the collection of evidence to present to the Minister and to detail the operation of the list.The article focuses on the preliminary part of the research that covered discussion groups with purposive sample of older people, managers and staff during which a vignette approach was used to explore their perspectives.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Jill Manthorpe, Jo Moriarty, Martin Stevens, Shereen Hussein and Nadira Sharif

There is a shortage of examples of arrangements and practice approaches that focus on mental wellbeing in black and minority ethnic (BME) older people. This article draws…

126

Abstract

There is a shortage of examples of arrangements and practice approaches that focus on mental wellbeing in black and minority ethnic (BME) older people. This article draws on our practice enquiry1, which brought together accounts of social care practice across different types of social care settings from four parts of the UK, away from the areas of high demographic concentration that have been the focus of most previous research. Over 80 practitioners, managers, older people and carers were interviewed over 2009‐2010. They described and reflected on the support for older people from BME backgrounds, particularly focusing on how they might promote mental well‐being.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Lisa Pinkney, Bridget Penhale, Jill Manthorpe, Neil Perkins, David Reid and Shereen Hussein

This article reports on the views of 92 social workers about their practice in adult protection in England and Wales as part of a wider study of adult protection working…

2160

Abstract

This article reports on the views of 92 social workers about their practice in adult protection in England and Wales as part of a wider study of adult protection working and regulation that took place between 2004‐2007 in 26 sample local authorities. The article explores social workers' reported experiences of partnership or multiagency working and how this, along with overarching regulatory frameworks, affected their practice within and across agencies. Among findings from the study were that social workers considered that sharing information and responsibilities led to positive outcomes for service users and that the incorporation of different agency perspectives supplemented sharing of best practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Caroline Norrie, Martin Stevens, Katherine Graham, Jill Manthorpe, Jo Moriarty and Shereen Hussein

– The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology being used in a study exploring the organisation of adult safeguarding.

1396

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology being used in a study exploring the organisation of adult safeguarding.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods study is presented which describes how the research team is seeking to identify models of adult safeguarding and then compare them using a quasi-experimental study design.

Findings

Close examination of this study's methodology highlights the potential value of mixed-method research approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Anticipated study challenges include difficulties with gaining agreement from study sites and recruitment of people who have been the subject of a safeguarding referral.

Originality/value

This will be the first study in England to identify and compare different models of adult safeguarding in depth. Outlining and discussing current methodology is likely to be of interest to practitioners, managers and other researchers and policy makers.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

1 – 10 of 15