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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Vijay Kuriakose, Sreejesh S., Heerah Jose and Shelly Jose

The purpose of this paper is to test the activity reduces conflict associated strain (ARCAS) model with the aid of AET examining the direct effect of relationship conflict…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the activity reduces conflict associated strain (ARCAS) model with the aid of AET examining the direct effect of relationship conflict on employee well-being and also discussing the mechanism through which relationship conflict influences employee well-being, and also to test the ARCAS model examining whether passive and active conflict management styles influence this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses were collected from 554 software engineers using structured questionnaire and postulated relationships were tested using Process Macros.

Findings

The study established that relationship conflicts are detrimental to employee well-being. It also established the indirect effect of relationship conflict on employee well-being through negative affect state. Negative affect state is an intra-personal mechanism linking relationship conflict and employee well-being. The study also extended the ARCAS model by establishing that passive ways of handling conflict amplify and problem-solving conflict management style mitigates the adverse impact of relationship conflict. Contrary to the prediction, forcing conflict management style was found to amplify the adverse effect of relationship conflict on well-being through negative affect state.

Practical implications

The findings of the study highlight the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on well-being and highlight the vital role of individual affective states in the conflict process. Furthermore, the study provides valuable insights for managers on how individuals’ conflict management styles influence the effect of relationship conflict on well-being.

Originality/value

The study specifically examined the effect of relationship conflict on employee well-being and explored the psychological process through which relationship conflict diminishes well-being. Moreover, the study tested and extended ARCAS model with the aid of Affective Events Theory.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Vijay Kuriakose, Sreejesh S., Heerah Jose, Anusree M.R. and Shelly Jose

The primary objective of this paper is to extend the Activity Reduces Conflict Associated Strain (ARCAS) model. To test the ARCAS model, the study aims to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this paper is to extend the Activity Reduces Conflict Associated Strain (ARCAS) model. To test the ARCAS model, the study aims to examine the effect of process conflict on employee well-being and the role of negative affect as an intrapersonal mechanism linking process conflict and employee well-being. Further, to extend the emerging ARCAS model, the study examines whether the assumed indirect effect of process conflict on employee well-being through negative affect is conditional upon levels of conflict management styles.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 554 software engineers working in information technology firms responded to the administered questionnaire and hypothesised relationships were tested using Process Macros.

Findings

The findings indicate that process conflict is negatively related to employee well-being and the negative affect state mediates the relationship between process conflict and employee well-being. As hypothesised, it was found that the indirect effect of process conflict on employee well-being through the negative affect state is conditional upon levels of conflict management styles of the employees.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the conflict literature by establishing the detrimental effect of process conflict on employee well-being. The study also established the explanatory mechanism linking process conflict and employee well-being. Further, the study extended the emerging ARCAS model by establishing the moderating role of conflict management styles as well as the conditional indirect effect.

Practical implications

The study highlighted the within-individual effect of process conflict in deteriorating employee well-being. The study provides valuable insights to the managers and practitioners about how individuals’ conflict management styles influence well-being.

Originality/value

The study specifically examined the effect of process conflict, which was omitted from conflict literature considering it the same as task conflict, on employee well-being. The study established the within-individual mechanism through which process conflict diminishes employee well-being. Also, the study extended the ARCAS model by examining the effect of conflict management styles with the aid of Affective Events Theory.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Rebeca Peacock, Heather Grevatt, Ellie Dworak, Lindsay Marsh and Shelly Doty

This paper aims to describe the evolution of an academic library’s approach to first-year student information literacy instruction from face-to-face instruction to a fully…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the evolution of an academic library’s approach to first-year student information literacy instruction from face-to-face instruction to a fully integrated online microcredential. The design considerations, motivation theory and evaluation methods used to create and evaluate the course are also discussed, with implications for future library microcredential design, integration and research in campus first-year seminar courses.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a multi-method approach is used to evaluate an undergraduate asynchronous online information literacy microcredential embedded in a first-year seminar. Two methods (Likert scale survey and coded reflection essays) were used to evaluate whether one method may be more beneficial than the other in future iterations of evaluating microcredentials.

Findings

In looking at a complex cognitive process such as motivation, multiple approaches to analyzing student thoughts may be beneficial. In addition, the role of the first-year seminar instructor, to help students make a connection to library material, is reinforced as is the need to provide students with accurate expectations for time required to complete online asynchronous microcredential courses.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the evaluation of microcredentials in academic libraries and also has implications for other campus departments investigating the creation of microcourses that are integrated into campus programs. These implications can be addressed in the design and development phases of the microcredential using Keller’s attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction model, and in turn, can be improved through iterative evaluation cycles using collected student data.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2004

Abstract

Details

Theory and Research on Human Emotions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-108-8

Content available

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Book part
Publication date: 26 May 2021

Lessie Branch

The decline in attendance at historically Black colleges and universities and their existence is as much about the theoretical frameworks of social knowledge that exist…

Abstract

The decline in attendance at historically Black colleges and universities and their existence is as much about the theoretical frameworks of social knowledge that exist within a putative post-racial society as it is about the systemic destabilization of educational institutions that produce a critical mass of Black and Brown professional through, inter alia, neoliberal narratives of individualism. What impact does framing have on erroneous beliefs about the efficacy of HBCUs? In the context of America's historical and current sociopolitical environment, HBCUs are more than educative spaces for Black students. HBCUs are places where the transformative practices of rhetorical criticism and collective action can uproot attitudes and theories that lead Blacks students to believe the marginalized outcomes they experience are their own fault over systemic racial discrimination.

Details

Reimagining Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-664-0

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2019

Jonas da Silva Oliveira, Graça Maria do Carmo Azevedo and Maria José Pires Carvalho Silva

This study aims to explore the firm’s and country-level institutional forces that determine banks’ CSR reporting diversity, during the recent global financial crisis.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the firm’s and country-level institutional forces that determine banks’ CSR reporting diversity, during the recent global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

Specifically, this study assesses whether economic and institutional conditions explain CSR disclosure strategies used by 30 listed and unlisted banks from six countries in the context of the recent 2007/2008 global financial crisis. The annual reports and social responsibility reports of the largest banks in Canada, the UK, France, Italy, Spain and Portugal were content analyzed.

Findings

The findings suggest that economic factors do not influence CSR disclosure. Institutional factors associated with the legal environment, industry self-regulation and the organization’s commitments in maintaining a dialogue with relevant stakeholders are crucial elements in explaining CSR reporting. Consistent with the Dillard et al.’s (2004) model, CSR disclosure by banks not only stems from institutional legitimacy processes, but also from strategic ones.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the importance of CSR regulation to properly monitor manager’s’ opportunistic use of CSR information and regulate the assurance activities (regarding standards, their profession or even the scope of assurance) to guarantee the proper credibility reliability of CSR information.

Originality/value

The study makes two major contributions. First, it extends and modifies the model used by Chih et al. (2010). Second, drawn on the new institutional sociology, this study develops a theoretical framework that combines the multilevel model of the dynamic process of institutionalization, transposition and deinstitutionalization of organizational practices developed by Dillard et al. (2004) with Campbell’s (2007) theoretical framework of socially responsible behavior. This theoretical framework incorporates a more inclusive social context, aligned with a more comprehensive sociology-based institutional theory (Dillard et al., 2004; Campbell, 2007), which has never been used in the CSR reporting literature hitherto.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Yussri Sawani, Mustaffa Mohamed Zain and Faizah Darus

This paper aims to examine the development and evolution of sustainability reporting and assurance practices in Malaysia to identify the current practice and trend of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the development and evolution of sustainability reporting and assurance practices in Malaysia to identify the current practice and trend of reporting and the level of awareness on assurance on sustainability reporting in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews and questionnaire surveys were used to obtain respondents' perceptions on issues related to sustainability reporting and assurance practices among the ACCA‐MeSRA (Malaysian Environmental and Social Reporting Award) participants in 2007 coupled with content analysis of corporate annual reports and other standalone reports.

Findings

Results from the study provide evidence that most of the information relating to sustainability disclosure reported is integrated in the annual report and with no assurance statement due to low level of awareness and the absence of legislative pressure to commission the practice. The study indicates that companies applied selective reporting on issues relating to monetary contribution predominantly due to minority shareholders' insistence on better return for their investment.

Research limitations/implications

The nature of this study is exploratory and focuses on the evolution of sustainability reporting from the current state of corporate responsibility reporting and the availability of assurance practices in Malaysia. Findings in the study revealed several issues that require further analysis to identify significant factors that would influence sustainability reporting and assurance practices.

Practical implications

This study creates interest in the sustainability reporting and assurance practices in the Asian developing countries as its adaptation is far from developed.

Originality/value

This paper presents preliminary insights of the current trend and future direction of sustainability reporting and assurance in Malaysia.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Nick Hopwood and Karen Jensen

Shadow organizing refers to the emergence of parallel arrangements that sit alongside and imitate mainstream or conventional ways of organizing. It can be a response to…

Abstract

Purpose

Shadow organizing refers to the emergence of parallel arrangements that sit alongside and imitate mainstream or conventional ways of organizing. It can be a response to challenges that require new ways of working without abandoning what is valuable about conventional arrangements. However, the processes through which shadow organizing is accomplished are not well understood; there is a need to go beyond traditional notions of mimicry and metaphor. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper demonstrates how a Tardean approach to imitation can address this gap. It deploys imitation as an explanatory concept, based on contemporary readings of Tarde, as well as understandings of organizing as an unfolding process. Child and Family Centres in Tasmania (Australia), are used as an example of shadow organizing, delivering integrated health and education services in an emerging parallel arrangement.

Findings

The analysis highlights an imitation dynamic which is far from straightforward mimicry. Rather, it comprises repetition and generation of difference. This dynamic is conceptualized in Tardean fashion as three patterns: the imitation of ideas before expression; the selective nature of imitation; and insertion of the old alongside the new.

Originality/value

The paper moves beyond metaphors of shadow organizing, and understandings of shadow organizing as mimicry. Conceptualizing imitation in an alternative way, it contributes fresh insights into how shadow organizing is accomplished. This enriches and expands the conceptual apparatus for researchers wishing to understand the betwixt and between of shadow organizing.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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