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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Celeste Foster, Lynsey Birch, Shelly Allen and Gillian Rayner

The purpose of this paper is to outline a UK-based interdisciplinary workforce development project that had the aim of improving service delivery for children and young…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a UK-based interdisciplinary workforce development project that had the aim of improving service delivery for children and young people who self-harm or are feeling suicidal.

Design/methodology/approach

This innovative practice-higher-education partnership utilised an iterative consultation process to establish the local workforce need and then facilitated the systematic synthesis and presentation of evidence-based clinical guidelines in a practical format, for staff working directly with young people who self-harm in non-mental health settings.

Findings

The development, content and structure of this contextualised resource is presented, along with emerging outcomes and learning from the team. It is anticipated that this may also be a useful strategy and resource for other teams in other areas and is intended to provide a template that can be adapted by other localities to meet the specific needs of their own workforce.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates how higher education-practice partnerships can make clinical guidelines and research evidence in a field often thought of as highly specialist, accessible to all staff. It also shows a process of liaison and enhanced understanding across universal/specialist mental health service thresholds.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how collaborative partnerships can work to bridge the gap between evidence-based guidelines and their implementation in practice, through innovative multi-agency initiatives.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Morris Zelditch

The primary purpose of this chapter is to assess the effects of twenty-five years of the Group Processes Conference on advances in the study of group processes that have…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this chapter is to assess the effects of twenty-five years of the Group Processes Conference on advances in the study of group processes that have taken place between 1988 and 2014.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This chapter places the twenty-five years of the Group Processes Conference in the context of the changes that have taken place between small groups research in the 1950s and group processes research in the 1980s and beyond.

Findings

Between the 1950s and 1980s small groups research reinvented, reconceptualized, and reinvigorated itself as group processes research. In this period, small groups research, its applied research, and its research programs became increasingly theory-driven, and its concept of the group and its levels increasingly abstract, general, and analytic. As a consequence of these changes, the concept of the field itself became increasingly analytic. The Group Processes Conference was at once a reflection of these changes and a driving force in the subsequent advances in group processes research. It both quickened and amplified the effects of individual-level factors and of thirty years of Advances in Group Processes on the transformation of the field and was also, like Advances in Group Processes, a driving force in the subsequent advances in group processes research. The present chapter concludes with an analysis of the mechanisms of the effects of the Group Processes Conference on group processes research.

Originality/Value

The program for the twenty-fifth year of the Group Processes Conference celebrates its effects on the field of group processes research.

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Shelly Y. McCallum, Monica L. Forret and Hans-Georg Wolff

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships of internal and external networking behaviors of managers and professionals with their affective, continuance…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships of internal and external networking behaviors of managers and professionals with their affective, continuance, and normative commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 335 managers and professionals of a health system who completed a survey on networking behavior and organizational commitment. Correlation analyses and multiple regressions were performed to test our hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that networking behavior focussed within an individual's organization was positively related with affective commitment and normative commitment. Networking with individuals outside of an individual's organization showed a significant negative relationship with normative commitment. Contrary to expectations, networking externally was not related to affective commitment, and neither internal nor external networking behaviors were related to continuance commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Because data were collected at a single point in time, no statements can be made about causality. Future research is needed assessing both internal and external networking behavior and the three types of organizational commitment across time to help determine direction of causality or whether reciprocal relationships exist.

Practical implications

Organizations that encourage internal networking behaviors may see individuals who are more connected with their colleagues and affectively committed to their organizations. However, encouraging external networking behavior may result in a drop in normative commitment as individuals might identify more with their profession than their employer.

Originality/value

Although previous research has shown that networking behavior is related to job performance and career success measures, the research extends the literature by investigating whether networking is related to attitudinal variables such as organizational commitment. The paper explores whether differential relationships exist between internal and external networking behavior with three types of organizational commitment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2010

Carol Ireland and Shelly Morris‐King

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Keith Whitfield and Constantine Bourlakis

An analysis is made of the effect of YTS participation on thesubsequent employment and earnings of participants. It uses data fromthe first cohort of the England and Wales…

Abstract

An analysis is made of the effect of YTS participation on the subsequent employment and earnings of participants. It uses data from the first cohort of the England and Wales Youth Cohort Studies. These focus on a cohort of young persons who reached the minimum school‐leaving age in 1984 and were eligible for entry into the original one‐year version of YTS. The results indicate that participation is positively associated with subsequent employment and negatively associated with subsequent earnings.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2009

Shelly Morris‐King

The longer‐term psychological impact of childhood wartime experiences is an under‐researched area. Davies' (2001) work has been seminal in drawing attention to the…

Abstract

The longer‐term psychological impact of childhood wartime experiences is an under‐researched area. Davies' (2001) work has been seminal in drawing attention to the challenges that older people face in coming to terms with their early childhood experiences during the Second World War. This project used qualitative research methods to investigate the lived experience of older people who were evacuated during the war or remained in Liverpool, UK and experienced ‘the Blitz’ firsthand. It also investigated older people's understanding of these experiences, the meaning they attributed to them, and how they felt these experiences had affected them across the lifespan. The data collection phase of this project included an initial focus group and four free association narrative (FAN) interviews. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was the method used to draw out main themes for each of the participants. Analysis revealed specific psychological issues for each of the participants, along with specific coping strategies. Analysis also suggested that some older people continued to find it challenging to make sense of their early experiences and to assimilate these unusual events into their life narratives. This project has contributed to the limited literature base relating to the longer‐term consequences of early wartime experiences, which may be of use to psychologists working with a range of individuals with past or more recent experiences of war or ‘war‐like’ experiences.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Adam D. Klein

Provides direction for researchers, collections developers, and other interested people to locate sources of information on The Beat Generation. Focussing on the primary…

1258

Abstract

Provides direction for researchers, collections developers, and other interested people to locate sources of information on The Beat Generation. Focussing on the primary period of Beat Generation productivity, 1951‐1960, and on the Beat Generation’s two principal milieux, San Francisco’s North Beach and New York City’s Greenwich Village, this pathfinder gives prominence to the works of the two defining figures of the Beat Generation: Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, whose seminal works, respectively Howl and On the Road, inspired a generation of “beatniks” and paved the way for the Hippie flowering and Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Emphasis is placed on the background, context, and impact of the Beat Movement, rather than on a critical analysis of their work.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2022

Colin Gordon

This chapter focuses on the Trump administration's health policies, with an emphasis on its efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act and its response to the COVID-19…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the Trump administration's health policies, with an emphasis on its efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act and its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It assesses those policies both in the context of the administration's broader goals and motivations, and in the context of systemic deficits and deficiencies in American health policy. I argue that failures of health policy and health security in the face of the pandemic reflect those longstanding weaknesses, much more so than the administration's actions (or inaction).

Details

Trump and the Deeper Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-513-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2023

Rory Higgs, Anne Liao, Tracy Windsor and Shelly Ben-David

Previous research has highlighted the importance of engaging people with lived experience (PWLE) in the knowledge creation process. However, diverse approaches to…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has highlighted the importance of engaging people with lived experience (PWLE) in the knowledge creation process. However, diverse approaches to engagement exist. In addition, tensions remain in community-engaged research (CER), including how to address structural inequalities in research settings. This study aims to consider how CER interacts with citizenship within and beyond the research context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study discusses the authors’ experiences as a majority-PWLE of psychosis research team in Canada, including successes and challenges the authors experienced building their team and navigating research institutions. This study also reflects on the authors’ pathways through citizenship, prior to and during the research process. This study discusses divergent models of CER and their applicability to the cyclical process of citizenship and community participation.

Findings

Relationships between academic and peer researchers developed organically over time. However, this study was limited by structural barriers such as pay inequality and access to funding. The authors recognize that there are barriers to full citizenship and acknowledge their resources and privilege of being well supported within their communities. Team members built on a foundation of citizenship to access participation in research. This led to opportunities to engage in community spaces, and for PWLE to participate in research as partners and leaders. This study also found that citizenship is a way of giving back, by building a sense of social responsibility.

Originality/value

Academic and peer researchers can reflect on the authors’ experiences to build more inclusive research teams and communities by using a citizenship approach to research participation.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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