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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

S. Sarkar

Shelflife of cultured milk products is longer than milk but it is still limited. Shelflife of cultured milk products could be enhanced by adopting various techniques…

Abstract

Purpose

Shelflife of cultured milk products is longer than milk but it is still limited. Shelflife of cultured milk products could be enhanced by adopting various techniques. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the longer shelflife thus attained would extend the market reach and would be economically beneficial to both producers and consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Attempt has been made to enlighten the various techniques such as bacteriocin (nisin, MicrogardTM, natamycin, etc.), lactoperoxidase‐thiocyanate‐hydrogen peroxide system (LP‐system), high pressure treatment, post‐production heat‐treatment (thermization, microwave heating), ultra‐violet (UV) irradiation, carbonization, etc.

Findings

Application of more than one bacteriocin may be advantageous to minimize the possibility of survival of microflora resistant to a particular bacteriocin. Pasteurization, being more detrimental to dietetic properties of cultured milk products than thermization, its application is not suggested as a method of preservation. Microwave heating may be better than conventional pasteurization.

Originality/value

Conjugated application of various techniques would be more efficacious in extending the shelflife of cultured milk products. Extension in shelflife of cultured milk products would be economically beneficial for producers and consumers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Willem A. Rijpkema, Roberto Rossi and Jack G.A.J. van der Vorst

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether an existing sourcing strategy can effectively supply products of appropriate quality with acceptable levels of product waste…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether an existing sourcing strategy can effectively supply products of appropriate quality with acceptable levels of product waste if applied to an international perishable product supply chain. The authors also analyse whether the effectiveness of this sourcing strategy can be improved by including costs for expected shelf life losses while generating order policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The performance of sourcing strategies is examined in a prototype international strawberry supply chain. Appropriate order policies were determined using parameters both with and without costs for expected shelf life losses. Shelf life losses during transport and storage were predicted using microbiological growth models. The performance of the resulting policies was assessed using a hybrid discrete event chain simulation model that includes continuous quality decay.

Findings

The study's findings reveal that the order policies obtained with standard cost parameters result in poor product quality and large amounts of product waste. Also, including costs for expected shelf life losses in sourcing strategies significantly reduces product waste and improves product quality, although transportation costs rise.

Practical implications

The study shows that in perishable product supply chain design a trade-off should be made between transportation costs, shortage costs, inventory costs, product waste, and expected shelf life losses.

Originality/value

By presenting a generically applicable methodology for perishable product supply chain design, the authors contribute to research and practice efforts to reduce food waste. Furthermore, product quality information is included in supply chain network design, a research area that is still in its infancy.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Evren Sahin, Mohamed Zied Babaï, Yves Dallery and Renaud Vaillant

The technology of time temperature integrators (TTI) is used to ensure the safety and quality of temperature sensitive goods such as food and drugs along their entire…

Abstract

Purpose

The technology of time temperature integrators (TTI) is used to ensure the safety and quality of temperature sensitive goods such as food and drugs along their entire lifespan. This work aims to provide a better understanding of potential benefits that can be expected from the use of TTIs in terms of supply chain improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the different types of information provided by TTIs: information on products' freshness and information on products' remaining shelf lives, the paper identifies qualitatively the benefits that would stem from each type of information.

Findings

A framework is built to evaluate the benefits, in terms of cost reduction and/or quality service improvement, that would stem from information provided by TTIs. Illustrative models are also developed in order to quantify some of these benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The coexistence on products' packaging of a printed use by date and a TTI device can be misleading for consumers. Besides, the benefits that supply chain actors will achieve by using TTIs will vary by product category and are dependent upon the level at which the TTI device is used. Further research and case studies have to be developed in order to bring further answers to these issues.

Practical implications

This paper is one of the first studies that helps companies in the food and the health care industry to better understand the benefits of using TTIs from an operations management point of view and to evaluate whether it can be advantageous to deploy this technology or not.

Originality/value

This work differs from investigations in literature in that it identifies exhaustively and qualitatively the benefits of TTIs and to give perspectives for quantitative models that can be developed to assess these benefits.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Kasper Kiil, Hans-Henrik Hvolby, Kym Fraser, Heidi Dreyer and Jan Ola Strandhagen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of sharing and utilizing remaining shelf life (RSL) information from grocery stores by the use of age-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of sharing and utilizing remaining shelf life (RSL) information from grocery stores by the use of age-based replenishment policies for perishables.

Design/methodology/approach

The performance is evaluated through a discrete event simulation model, which mirrors a part of one of Norway’s largest grocery retailer and uses their POS data to reflect a realistic demand pattern of 232 stores for one year.

Findings

The findings indicate that a current age-based replenishment policy (EWA policy) provides a significant improvement of 17.7 percent increase in availability for perishables with a shelf life between 4 and 11 days, but suffers from high inventory levels and only reduces waste by 3.4 percent compared to a base stock policy. A proposed adjustment to the EWA policy, EWASS, provides a more balanced performance in the conducted study with a reduction of 10.7 percent waste and 10.3 percent increase in availability by keeping the same average inventory level.

Practical implications

Sharing and utilizing RSL information for replenishment of perishables with a predetermined shelf life between 6 and 11 days can be beneficial, and could enable the replenishment processes to be automated. However, for products with longer shelf life, the benefits slowly diminish.

Originality/value

The study proposes a new age-based replenishment policy which in the conducted study showed a more balanced performance improvement, in both waste and availability, compared with previous replenishment policies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Alice Pegg

This article highlights current research at the Leatherhead Food Research Association which is relevant to shelflife assessment of food products. One area is to improve…

Abstract

This article highlights current research at the Leatherhead Food Research Association which is relevant to shelflife assessment of food products. One area is to improve the quality and safety of fish ‐ both fresh and cold‐smoked. Food MicroModel, a computer software package which aids in the prediction of the microbiological safety and spoilage potential of food products, is described. New methods capable of predicting the stability of oils and fats to oxidation, which can be a significant cause of reduced shelflife in fat‐containing foods, are described. Novel analytical instruments, known as electronic noses, have been shown to have potential, as has a total antioxidant activity test. Temperature control in factories is often a compromise between product safety and the need to maintain reasonable employee working conditions. This is no longer a problem with the development of glove box technology, which separates the two environments. The final study discussed in this article is the development of accelerated shelflife tests for chocolate products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Marta Afonso Freitas, Wagner Borges and Linda Lee Ho

Sensory evaluations to determine the shelf life of food products are routinely conducted in food experimentation as a part of each product development program, whether it…

Abstract

Sensory evaluations to determine the shelf life of food products are routinely conducted in food experimentation as a part of each product development program, whether it includes a new product, product improvement or a change in type or specification of an ingredient. In such experiments, trained panelists are asked to judge food attributes by reference to a scale of numbers. The “failure time” associated with a product unit under test is usually defined as the time required to reach a cut‐off point previously defined by the food company. Important issues associated with the planning and execution of this kind of testing are total sampling size, frequency of sample withdrawals, panel design, and statistical analysis of the panel data, to list a few. Different approaches have been proposed for the analysis of this kind of data. In particular, Freitas et al. proposed an alternative model based on a dichotomization of the score data and a Weibull as the underlying distribution for the time to failure. Also, through a simulation study, the bias and mean square error of the estimates obtained for percentiles and fraction defectives were evaluated. These quantities were used to estimate the shelf life. The simulation study used only the same sample plan implemented in the real situation. This paper focuses on the planning issues associated with these experiments. Sample plans are contrasted and compared in a simulation study, through the use of the approach proposed by Freitas et al.. The simulation results showed that, in general, one can get results much more precise and with smaller bias with a shorter follow‐up time, allocating more panelists to each evaluation time.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Herianus Justhianus D. Lalel, I. Nyoman Widiarta Mahayasa, Zulianatul Hidayah and Kartiwan Kartiwan

The purposes of this paper are to determine the nutritional composition of the pulp and its antioxidant activity; study the effect of drying and storage on the nutritional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are to determine the nutritional composition of the pulp and its antioxidant activity; study the effect of drying and storage on the nutritional composition and antioxidant of the pulp; investigate the effect of de-bittering using fermentative microbes, sodium carbonate and polyethylene glycol (PEG) on antioxidant of the pulp, and to study the shelf-life and sensory evaluation of de-bittered pulp products.

Design/methodology/approach

The ripe fruits of palmyra (Borassus flabellifer L) were collected around Kupang city, Indonesia. The pulp was extracted with different techniques. The fresh pulp was directly analyzed for its nutritional and antioxidant properties. The rest of the pulp was de-bittered, dried and used for further treatments and products development. The de-bittered pulp was used to make chips, stick cracker, and jelly sweet. Fresh products were sensory evaluated by 30 semi-trained panelists. For shelf-life analysis, products were wrapped and/or packed with different thickness of food grade plastic, plastic-alumina foil, or mica stopples and kept at different temperatures (30, 40 and 50oC) for one month.

Findings

The fresh pulp contains carotenoids (609.10 mg per kg of pulp), vitamin C (461.40 mg per kg of pulp), polyphenols (270 mg per kg of pulp) and anthocyanin (53.90 mg per kg of pulp). Free radical scavenging activity of the dried pulp (water content of 11.60 percent) was 93.4 percent. Several techniques including fermentation, sodium carbonate, and PEG treatment have been successfully developed to reduce the bitterness of the pulp without significantly reducing its antioxidant activities. Food products (chips, stick cracker, and jelly sweet) have then been developed and have got positive response from panelist.

Research limitations/implications

Pulp of fruit is a potential source of antioxidants, i.e. carotenoids (pro vitamin A), vitamin C, and polyphenols. The pulp potentially can be used in fresh and dried form for functional food. The bitterness of the pulp can be significantly reduced using fermentation, sodium carbonate or PEG treatment. The pulp can be utilized for producing chips, crackers, and semi moist food products.

Practical implications

First, pulp of the palmyrah fruit can be easily extracted using water. Second, the bitterness of the pulp can be reduced by using traditional fermentation starter. Third, many type of food products can be developed using the palmyrah pulp.

Social implications

This effort offers opportunity for farmers to optimize the use of palmyrah pulp for functional food. It will provide new jobs and increase the income of farmer at East Nusa Tenggara Province.

Originality/value

The study has revealed that pulp of palmyrah fruit is a source of antioxidants: carotenoids (pro vitamin A), vitamin C, and polyphenols. The pulp potentially can be used in fresh and dried form for functional food. The bitterness of the pulp can be significantly reduced using fermentation, sodium carbonate, and PEG. The pulp can be utilized for producing chips, crackers, and semi moist food products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Irina Farquhar and Alan Sorkin

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized…

Abstract

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized innovative information technology open architecture design and integrating Radio Frequency Identification Device data technologies and real-time optimization and control mechanisms as the critical technology components of the solution. The innovative information technology, which pursues the focused logistics, will be deployed in 36 months at the estimated cost of $568 million in constant dollars. We estimate that the Systems, Applications, Products (SAP)-based enterprise integration solution that the Army currently pursues will cost another $1.5 billion through the year 2014; however, it is unlikely to deliver the intended technical capabilities.

Details

The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1975

The findings of the Steering Group on Food Freshness in relation to the compulsory date marking of food contained in their Report, reviewed elsewhere in this issue, has…

Abstract

The findings of the Steering Group on Food Freshness in relation to the compulsory date marking of food contained in their Report, reviewed elsewhere in this issue, has brought within measurable distance the Regulations which were, in any case, promised for1975. The Group consider that the extension of voluntary open date marking systems will not be sufficiently rapid (or sufficiently comprehensive) to avoid the need or justify the delay in introducing legislation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 77 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Lars-Erik Gadde and Pegah Amani

The purpose of this paper is to present a “network” framing of food supply arrangements. Such frameworks have been asked for in previous research as supplements to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a “network” framing of food supply arrangements. Such frameworks have been asked for in previous research as supplements to prevailing supply chain conceptualizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework builds on industrial network theory. According to this approach, business reality is analyzed in three inter-related dimensions: the activities undertaken, the resources used for this undertaking, and the actors controlling resources and activities. For each dimension, relevant concepts are derived for analysis of the features of food supply and food waste.

Findings

The network framing was useful for analyzing the prerequisites and consequences for two approaches to reduce food waste: one based on extension of shelf-life, the other relying on enhanced responsiveness in the supply arrangement. The framework was then used for suggesting managerial actions to reduce food waste through increasing activity coordination, resource combining, and actor interaction with consideration of potential consequences of such actions.

Practical implications

Managerial issues in food supply are discussed with regard to the role of activity coordination, the role of resource combining, and the role of actor interaction in efforts to prevent food waste.

Originality/value

The paper suggests a novel approach for analyzing food supply networks with particular focus on food waste reduction. Such framings are applied in other supply systems, and requested by food supply researchers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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