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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Heather Höpfl, Sheila Smith and Sharon Spencer

Based on empirical work from two major UK organizations. BritishAirways and BT (formerly British Telecom), both of whom have, afterprivatization, engaged in large‐scale…

Abstract

Based on empirical work from two major UK organizations. British Airways and BT (formerly British Telecom), both of whom have, after privatization, engaged in large‐scale culture change programmes. Both organizations have made substantial job cuts and (at the time of writing in May 1991) both organizations have announced the need for further redundancies. Considers the objectives of culture change programmes and evaluates the extent to which they have been achieved in the organizations concerned, i.e. what values are cultivated and to what extent are they shared by organizational members? Considers the conflicting messages offered by the redundancy programmes and attempts to assess the implications for individuals and for self‐perception of job losses in the context of culture change.

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Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1929

E. BROOKS

THE county librarian is often asked in amused, curious or contemptuous tone “what do the “villagers” read?” In a purely agricultural county consisting of small villages…

Abstract

THE county librarian is often asked in amused, curious or contemptuous tone “what do the “villagers” read?” In a purely agricultural county consisting of small villages with no urban area it is possible that literary appreciation is on a lower level than in counties where there are a number of towns; for it is an undeniable fact that although a country man's ability may be equal to that of his town cousin, the standard of education is higher in the towns than in the country. Town dwellers have more varied interests and as a rule have had to make more use of the education received in youth than the village folk whose daily work makes less demand upon the mental faculties.

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Library Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Glenn Firebaugh

One of the striking features of our historical era is the degree of global inequality. In some nations the average person lives on less than $200 per year. In other…

Abstract

One of the striking features of our historical era is the degree of global inequality. In some nations the average person lives on less than $200 per year. In other nations the average income is 100 times larger. Though adjusting for purchasing power parity narrows the gap by about 40 percent (Ram 1979), it is quite evident that the world's $23 trillion annual output is unequally distributed in the extreme.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1956

IF we devote this page largely to the Library Association we believe our readers, who are the most active workers in librarianship, will think us justified because the…

Abstract

IF we devote this page largely to the Library Association we believe our readers, who are the most active workers in librarianship, will think us justified because the Association is the central fact in our lives. Its Annual Report for 1955 has reached us. It is a document to be read, appreciated and criticised; we only wish we could say that it always is, for then surely some of the tart utterances about the inactivity, even uselessness, of our organization would be evaluated at their real worth or want of it. The Association does not work by means of press campaigns, or illegal dismissal of members who do not fulfil all its professional ethical codes. It has more direct access to the Government than is usually known. It was not quiescent when the Post‐master General increased book and newspaper postage; with other folk of influence it went to see him. It is not idle when posts are advertised at rates unsuitably parsimonious; it protests to the authorities issuing them invariably, and it makes it clear to chartered librarians that in applying for such posts they undersell and betray us all. Unfortunately these, the only lawful methods open to the Association, do not influence certain members. In fifteen cases, twelve were filled by those who will remember all their lives that they “let down the side” and probably at least five times as many were also their competitors. This is merely an explanatory word to those who complain of inaction.

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New Library World, vol. 57 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1931

OWING to the comparatively early date in the year of the Library Association Conference, this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD is published so that it may be in the hands of…

Abstract

OWING to the comparatively early date in the year of the Library Association Conference, this number of THE LIBRARY WORLD is published so that it may be in the hands of our readers before it begins. The official programme is not in the hands of members at the time we write, but the circumstances are such this year that delay has been inevitable. We have dwelt already on the good fortune we enjoy in going to the beautiful West‐Country Spa. At this time of year it is at its best, and, if the weather is more genial than this weather‐chequered year gives us reason to expect, the Conference should be memorable on that account alone. The Conference has always been the focus of library friendships, and this idea, now that the Association is so large, should be developed. To be a member is to be one of a freemasonry of librarians, pledged to help and forward the work of one another. It is not in the conference rooms alone, where we listen, not always completely awake, to papers not always eloquent or cleverly read, that we gain most, although no one would discount these; it is in the hotels and boarding houses and restaurants, over dinner tables and in the easy chairs of the lounges, that we draw out really useful business information. In short, shop is the subject‐matter of conference conversation, and only misanthropic curmudgeons think otherwise.

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New Library World, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Peer Brehm Christensen, Eva Hammerby, Else Smith and Shelia M. Bird

To determine the mortality of drug users after release from prison in Denmark, a cohort of drug users was identified from two national registers during 1996‐2001: the drug…

Abstract

To determine the mortality of drug users after release from prison in Denmark, a cohort of drug users was identified from two national registers during 1996‐2001: the drug treatment register (T) and the register of viral hepatitis (H). Incarcerations were extracted from the national penal register, vital status from the civil register, and causes of death from the death certificate register and the police register of drug‐related deaths. We identified 15,885 drug users (T: 15,735, H: 896), 62% of the estimated drug‐using population in Denmark. There were 1000 observed deaths, of which 51% were classified as overdose deaths. Mortality in the treatment cohort was 2.4/100 person years (py) (95% C.I. 2.2‐2.5/100 py) compared to the general population expectation of 0.2/100 py. Within the first 2 weeks after release from prison, 26 deaths were observed among 6019 released drug users corresponding to 13/100 py (95% CI 8‐19/100 py). Overdose deaths accounted for 24/26 deaths (92%) in the first two weeks compared to 121/179 (68%) hereafter (p <0.001). We conclude that drug users released from prison are at high risk of overdose death. We suggest that methadone treatment should be evaluated as a way to decrease mortality after release from prison.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1928

WITH the passing of Easier the British librarian enters upon summer arrangements and a new financial year at the same time. There have been no severe complaints of undue…

Abstract

WITH the passing of Easier the British librarian enters upon summer arrangements and a new financial year at the same time. There have been no severe complaints of undue financial “cutting” from public librarians; but there has been no very lusty jubilation caused by undue amplitude in appropriations. We may be grateful that in the general Stringency matters are not worse than they are. Our time will come. As for the summer work of libraries: of late there has been a tendency for the issues, during what are usually thought to be the slacker months, to approximate to those of winter time. This is not wholly, or even largely, due to the organization of holiday literature exhibitions and similar “added” activities, but it appears to be the result of increased reading habit. At the same time it must be remembered that last summer was not an out‐door one.

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New Library World, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1940

IN the Coventry tragedy, the central (Gulson) library was destroyed. Although not a library of the largest size, it was a considerable one, built up with the greatest…

Abstract

IN the Coventry tragedy, the central (Gulson) library was destroyed. Although not a library of the largest size, it was a considerable one, built up with the greatest skill, foresight and devotion by at least four of the best librarians of modern times, backed by a good committee for a generation. Three of these librarians have since commanded the largest municipal libraries of Great Britain.

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New Library World, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1933

A.G. STREET

THIS is a difficult subject inasmuch that rural dwellers differ widely in almost every respect. The motor car has made it possible for all sorts of town dwellers to live…

Abstract

THIS is a difficult subject inasmuch that rural dwellers differ widely in almost every respect. The motor car has made it possible for all sorts of town dwellers to live in the country, and still carry on their city avocations. But these are not the true countrymen, so in this article it is proposed to deal mainly with the farm labourer and farmer, or in other words the true sons of the soil.

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Library Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1933

THIS number of THE LIBRARY WORLD closes one of the most distinguished years in the history of libraries. The opening of the National Central Library by the King on…

Abstract

THIS number of THE LIBRARY WORLD closes one of the most distinguished years in the history of libraries. The opening of the National Central Library by the King on November 7th was undoubtedly the most important public happening in this country, not only of that particular day, but for a very long period. For the first time the highest personage in the land gave his countenance and approval to the work of the public library through the National Central Library which is its natural crown. In describing the Library as “a university which all may join and which none may ever leave,” His Majesty added a memorable phrase to library literature, and gave a new impulse to library activity.

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New Library World, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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