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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Ha Eun Park, Sheau Fen Crystal Yap and Marian Makkar

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the motivational tensions underlying mobile shopping (m-shopping) behaviours. The authors focus on consumer motivations and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the motivational tensions underlying mobile shopping (m-shopping) behaviours. The authors focus on consumer motivations and the pursuit of life end goals with respect to m-shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the means-end chain theory, hard-laddering approach was used to elicit associations between attributes, consequences and values from 251 online participants. Content analysis was used to develop a hierarchical value map “mapping” these associations to uncover underlying values for m-shopping.

Findings

Mobile shoppers are motivated by their self-actualisation needs (self-focused) and/or social needs (other-focused). Participants’ response contradictions reflected internal complexities and ambivalences during their purchasing decisions. Decisions are based on their concerns around security, time, technological or financial.

Practical implications

This study provides managerial insights into retail marketing and strategies. Marketers should consider creating user-friendly applications by researching the customer journey experience, heightening security measures and ensuring that added-value offers are clearly communicated to meet consumers’ personal values and motivations.

Originality/value

The paper presents an original conceptual contribution of personal values related to m-shopping as desires for self-empowerment, altruism and relationships with others, self-fulfilment and hedonism and possible consumer internal conflicts.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Marian Makkar and Sheau-Fen Yap

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions: how do consumers construct meaning around their inconspicuous luxury fashion experiences? What desires do…

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3536

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the following questions: how do consumers construct meaning around their inconspicuous luxury fashion experiences? What desires do inconspicuous consumers strive to fulfill? What sentiments do they associate with their inconspicuous luxury fashion consumption?

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research begins with a netnographic study of 11 online luxury blogs followed by in-depth interviews and home observations of ten luxury consumers with inconspicuous preferences in Dubai.

Findings

Inconspicuous choices are not simply for associative or dissociative motivations but several symbolic consumption schemas come into play. A typology of inconspicuous luxury fashion consumers has emerged: fashion influencers, trendsetters, fashion followers, and luxe conservatives.

Practical implications

The findings have potential to yield important managerial implications for fashion retailers and brand communications. The typology of inconspicuous consumers provides a basis for developing a more targeted relationship marketing program for luxury fashion brands.

Originality/value

This research advances luxury knowledge in fashion and consumer behavior research by unveiling how consumers construct meanings around their inconspicuous consumption. The typology developed in this study marks the starting point for further extensions to explore the complexities of inconspicuous luxury consumers, which are grounded in the roles they take on in society, how they plan their luxury consumption journey and how they eventually use these possessions for self-identification and communication to others.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Sanjaya Singh Gaur, Sivakumari Supramaniam, Sheau Fen Yap and Mele Foliaki

This paper aims to understand the attitudes of young Pacific Island adults towards financial products such as debt and money and explore the cultural elements influencing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the attitudes of young Pacific Island adults towards financial products such as debt and money and explore the cultural elements influencing the financial consumption amongst Pacific Island adults.

Design/methodology/approach

Hermeneutic phenomenology has been used to explore and gain insights into the experiences, thought processes, values and aspirations of young Pacific Island adults with regard to their consumption of financial products.

Findings

The findings identify culture as an influential factor in shaping the participants’ attitudes and financial consumption behaviour. Culture not only enabled the individuals to internalize their values, norms and beliefs but also shaped their way of thinking through the effect of communications.

Originality/value

Communication element within culture is identified as an influential factor in shaping the participants’ attitudes and financial consumption behaviour offering an important insight that social marketers should be aware of and be prepared to address when developing their financial educational programs or any other behavioural change interventions.

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2020

Marian Makkar, Sheau-Fen Yap and Russell Belk

This paper aims to examine the role of technology in shaping the interplay between intimate and economic relations in collaborative consumer networks (CCNs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of technology in shaping the interplay between intimate and economic relations in collaborative consumer networks (CCNs).

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on a three-year participatory netnographic and ethnographic field study of hosts, guests and community members within the Airbnb home-sharing network in New Zealand. The data consist of interviews, online and offline participant observations and brief discussions onsite (large-scale Airbnb events, host meetups and during Airbnb stays).

Findings

The findings reveal how technologies shape the relational work of home-sharing between intimate and economic institutions through grooming, bundling, brokerage, buffering and social edgework. This paper proposes a framework of triadic relational work enacted by network actors, involving complex exchange structures.

Research limitations/implications

This study focusses on a single context – a market-mediated home-sharing platform. The findings may not apply to other contexts of economic and social exchanges.

Practical implications

The study reveals that the construction of specific relational packages by Airbnb hosts using their digital technologies pave a path for home-sharing to skirt the norms of the home as a place of intimacy and the market as a place for economics. This allows these two spheres to flourish with little controversy.

Originality/value

By augmenting Zelizer’s relational work, this study produces theoretical insights into the agentic role of technology in creating and stabilising a CCN.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Russel P.J. Kingshott, Sanjaya Singh Gaur, Piyush Sharma, Sheau Fen Yap and Yekaterina Kucherenko

This paper aims to investigate the individual and combined effects of three types of psychological contracts between customers and service employees (i.e. transactional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the individual and combined effects of three types of psychological contracts between customers and service employees (i.e. transactional, relational and communal), resulting from the service organizations’ relational marketing efforts, on their customers’ service brand evaluations in terms of their satisfaction, trust and commitment toward the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a field-survey of 303 regular customers of beauty salons and hairdressers in Auckland, New Zealand. All the constructs were measured using adapted versions of well-established scales and data was analyzed using SmartPLS due to the relatively smaller sample size and the primary research objective being the prediction of the three outcome variables (i.e. satisfaction, trust and commitment).

Findings

Transactional and relational contracts have a negative and positive impact, respectively, upon communal contracts. Communal contracts mediate the impact of transactional and relational contracts on trust and commitment but not on satisfaction. Trust also mediates the relationship between satisfaction and commitment.

Research limitations/implications

This paper collected data from female customers of beauty salons and hairdressers in New Zealand, which may affect the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

This study provides practical insights into the differences in the roles of psychological contracts between the customers and service employees, which may help managers in service firms improve their customer relationship outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper extends the relationship and services marketing literature to reveal the individual and combined effects of the three types of psychological contracts on customer satisfaction, trust and commitment toward their service brand.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Yingzi Xu, Sheau Fen Crystal Yap and Kenneth F Hyde

This research investigates customer interactions in an online environment following a service failure, and explores the role of customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions in…

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2259

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates customer interactions in an online environment following a service failure, and explores the role of customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions in service recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

We examine C2C interactions between airline travellers by analysing their detailed conversations posted on an independent complaint forum. We adopt thematic analysis to scrutinise online dialogue that narrates stories about service failures and how they are resolved with the help of other customers.

Findings

Our analysis reveals that other customers act as helpers, educators, listeners and ironists in an online environment following a service failure. We identify information sharing, emotional release, social support, knowledge exchange and learning, and leadership in the online community as forms of C2C service recovery.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on C2C service recovery in an online environment; C2C interactions in an offline environment after a service failure are not explored. Future research can apply different research methods to different data sources in order to discover further insights into C2C service recovery.

Practical implications

C2C interactions in service recovery can lead to value creation that enhances customers’ overall satisfaction with their service experiences, and further re-shapes customers’ expectations of the service. Customers are an operant resource for service recovery; thus, service companies should facilitate customer-to-customer interactions that assist successful service recovery.

Originality/value

This research explores the functions and potential impact of online C2C service recovery; that is, service recovery through online C2C interactions. It advances understanding of service recovery by bridging current thinking on customer-dominant logic and the role of C2C interactions.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Sheau Fen Crystal Yap and Christina Kwai Choi Lee

The purpose of this paper is to examine online community loyalty through an extension of the theory of planned behaviour by incorporating motivational drivers of enjoyment…

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1731

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine online community loyalty through an extension of the theory of planned behaviour by incorporating motivational drivers of enjoyment and compatibility and the moderating role of consumer traits.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey of 382 Facebook users in Malaysia. Structural equation modelling was used to assess the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

Findings reveal that individuals’ attitude towards social network usage is associated with three factors: social influence, compatibility and enjoyment; attitude and usage behaviour are the determinants of online community loyalty. In addition, moderating effects are found in innovativeness and social network user experience.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation of the results to other contexts or populations should be made with caution given the study's focus on Facebook and its use of non-probability sampling. Future research can cross-validate or extend the theoretical model across different samples and/or virtual community settings.

Practical implications

This study highlights the importance of designing online brand community web sites which are not only appealing and enjoyable but also acts as an outlet for its members to build upon their experiences and showcase their innovativeness.

Originality/value

This research contributes to a better understanding of how personal factors can either strengthen or attenuate a member's loyalty to his or her online community. The research framework developed in this study can serve as a springboard for future research to examine other virtual community engagement such as blogging, online advertising and online public relation activities.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Nor Azila Mohd Noor, Sheau-Fen Yap, Kok-Hong Liew and Edwin Rajah

Drawing on a socio-cognitive model, the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the aim of this paper is to investigate whether the effects of social cognition on intention to…

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2669

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on a socio-cognitive model, the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the aim of this paper is to investigate whether the effects of social cognition on intention to consume dietary supplements moderate by health motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was carried out using a cross-sectional survey approach. Subjects comprised 438 undergraduate students from six universities in Malaysia.

Findings

Given strong support for the extended TPB's application to dietary supplements consumption provided by the study, it seems feasible that desirable changes in attitude, social norms, and perceptions of control might lead to corresponding changes in behavioural intention. The empirical findings, which are based on multi-group analysis, show that the strength of the relationships between informational influence, consumer attitude, and their intention to consume dietary supplements are strongly influenced by health motivation.

Practical implications

This research sets the ground for stakeholders in the healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors to improve their understanding of what drives dietary supplements consumption. Armed with this knowledge, marketers and health professionals could plan and execute their marketing strategies and health interventions more effectively.

Originality/value

The core contribution lies in an important extension of social cognitive model by incorporating the moderating effect of health motivation. This study demonstrates the measurement validity and predictive efficacy of the proposed integrative model which can be used as a promising framework to examine other preventive health behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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