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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Shavneet Sharma, Gurmeet Singh, Stephen Pratt and Jashwini Narayan

This study aims to adopt the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model to assess travel purchase intentions in Fiji and Solomon Islands. The UTAUT…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to adopt the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model to assess travel purchase intentions in Fiji and Solomon Islands. The UTAUT model is extended with the inclusion of trust and attitude. This allows for new relationships to be tested. Both countries are classified as Small Island Developing States (SIDS). These two countries are chosen because they are both exemplars for developing countries in the Pacific, which are often overlooked in the literature. In doing so, the study increases the generalizability of the research instrument and the UTAUT model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a quantitative approach and collects data from Fiji and Solomon Islands residents. The survey instrument comprises two broad sections. The first section contains a standard set of demographic questions, including age, gender, income, and education level. The second section contains the variable items for this study. The snowballing sampling technique was used to collect 620 responses using an online survey. Links to the questionnaire were circulated through the use of social media Facebook. The survey was designed and hosted using an online survey tool (SurveyMonkey).

Findings

The findings of this study show that both perceived trust and attitude have been found significant in both countries. On the other hand, performance expectancy (PE) and effort expectancy (EE) have not been found significant for Fiji and Solomon Islands respectively. This study also finds that PE affects attitude for both countries, however, EE is only significant in the Solomon Islands.

Research limitations/implications

Similar to other studies, this study is also bound by limitations that provide fertile ground for future research. The data in this study was based on convenience sampling. Thus, generalizations of the results need to be done with caution. Future research may be conducted that matches the sample to the population proportions. The definition of online travel purchases is another limitation of this study. A broad definition of an online purchase is considered in this study, which involves hotel reservations, holiday packages, cruises, and airline tickets. Thus, future research can be carried considering distinct purchasing motivations of categories of travel products rather than travel being considered as one category.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide valuable implications for both businesses to formulate and execute strategies to increase customers’ adoption of online travel purchases. The findings show how the differences in characteristics at the country level give rise to differences in customer perceptions and their intention to engage in online travel purchases. In doing so, businesses will be able to exploit the full commercial potential of their travel websites and reduce the administrative and personnel costs associated with traditional purchasing processes.

Originality/value

Insights from this study would be effective in understanding the unique characteristics of countries and their influence on customer behavior. This would enable more effective strategy development to improve customers' adoption of online travel purchases. The study also contributes theoretically by highlighting the importance of contextual factors in influencing the view of theories. It is one of the first studies to investigate the customer's adoption of technology in SIDS. In doing so, this study increases the generalizability of the research instrument and the UTAUT model by testing it in a developing country context where empirical evidence is lacking.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Gurmeet Singh, Neale Slack, Shavneet Sharma, Karishma Mudaliar, Suman Narayan, Rajini Kaur and Keshmi Upashna Sharma

This study aims to simultaneously examine the interrelated influence of antecedents involved in developing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty. A conceptual model which…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to simultaneously examine the interrelated influence of antecedents involved in developing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty. A conceptual model which incorporates service quality attributes, price fairness, customer satisfaction, brand image and trust and the resultant effect on customer loyalty is proposed to better understand how fast-food restaurant customer loyalty can be optimized.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research methodology adopting structural equation modelling was used to understand the interrelatedness and influence of antecedents involved in optimizing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty.

Findings

The findings indicate that service quality attributes (food quality and employee service quality) and price fairness significantly influence customer satisfaction and brand image, while physical environment quality has no significant influence. Additionally, customer satisfaction was found to influence brand trust and customer loyalty, while the brand image does not influence customer satisfaction but does influence brand trust and customer loyalty.

Practical implications

Understanding the interrelatedness and influence of antecedents involved in developing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty would enable academics and practitioners to formulate honed marketing and operational strategies to optimize customer loyalty and fast-food restaurant profitability.

Originality/value

This research addresses the paucity of research and marketing gaps regarding the interrelatedness and influence of antecedents involved in optimizing fast-food restaurant customer loyalty in Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Neale Slack, Gurmeet Singh and Shavneet Sharma

This paper aims to examine the effect of service quality dimensions and customer satisfaction on customer repurchase intention, word-of-mouth, complaining behaviour and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of service quality dimensions and customer satisfaction on customer repurchase intention, word-of-mouth, complaining behaviour and price sensitivity, as well as the effect of service quality dimensions on customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A public intercept survey collected data from 480 supermarket customers. Statistical package for the social sciences was used to provide descriptive and inferential analysis.

Findings

Results reveal the predominance and magnitude of effect of empathy positively on customer satisfaction, customer repurchase intention and word-of-mouth, and negatively on customer complaining behaviour and price sensitivity. Customer satisfaction also significantly affects these customer loyalty and disloyalty dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in the supermarket sector of only one country.

Practical implications

Insights have been provided to increase customer satisfaction and customer loyalty outcomes, and negate customer disloyalty outcomes, in the supermarket sector.

Originality/value

This study provides suggestions to supermarket executives regarding the significance of empathetic, customer-oriented behaviour by front-line supermarket service employees.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Neale Slack, Gurmeet Singh and Shavneet Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the impact of customer perceived value and its dimensions on customer satisfaction in a developing country, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the impact of customer perceived value and its dimensions on customer satisfaction in a developing country, and practical suggestions for marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey collected data from five-hundred supermarket customers in Fiji. SPSS was used to provide descriptive and inferential analysis.

Findings

Results reveal that customer perceived value (CPV) has a positive impact on customer satisfaction; and functional value (price/value for money) has more positive impact than social value, emotional value has a negative impact and functional value (performance/quality) has no significant impact on customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Considering this research was undertaken in the supermarket sector of only one country, other researchers are urged to replicate this research in Fiji and other developing countries, to yield further insight into the context-specific nature of CPV.

Practical implications

It is suggested that marketers note these findings (to understand better the conceptualisation and context-dependent nature of CPV, its dimensional interrelationships and its impact on customer satisfaction) in order to enhance CPV and ultimately customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study makes several contributions to research on CPV by providing insight into how developing country customers perceive the value of supermarkets from a construct and multidimensional perspective, the inter-relatedness of CPV dimensions and the impact of CPV and its dimensions on customer satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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