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Article

Chandan Parsad, Shashank Mittal and Raveesh Krishnankutty

Recent research on the energy system highlights the need for understanding the bandwidth of drivers and inhibitors of household investor's behaviour in rooftop PV (or…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research on the energy system highlights the need for understanding the bandwidth of drivers and inhibitors of household investor's behaviour in rooftop PV (or photovoltaic power system) and to fit the broader socio-economic context in which they are deployed. However, apart from few exceptions, these newer perspectives have not been duly applied in the research on rooftop PV. This paper aims to fill this gap and to shed new light on rooftop PV investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has been conducted with the primary data collected using two data sets of 237 households and 387 households of Indian southern state Kerala using survey-based questionnaire. The findings from first data set revealed that households considering the adoption of PV were likely influenced by six distinct factors, three motivators and three inhibitors. Second data set for multi-state analytic approach was proposed whereby the research model was tested using structural equation modelling (SEM). The outcomes of SEM were used as inputs for an artificial neural network (ANN) model for forecasting investor investment decision in in renewables. The ANN model was also used to rank the relative influence of significant predictors obtained from SEM.

Findings

In line with the risk–return framework, government subsidies act as primary motivator which helps in overcoming the initial risk of investment in the new technology. Further, low prices and low cost of maintenance are some of the financial motivators which may likely mitigate the long-term apprehension of returns and maintenance cost. Lastly, the strongest motivators of PV investment come from the environmental and financial motivator in the form of PV subsidies, which further solidifies the role of policy interventions in investment decision. The ANN model identified the technical barrier and knowledge and awareness factors play a significant role in forcasting the investor investing decision.

Practical implications

The study results will be useful for policymakers for framing strategies to attract and influence their investment in renewable energy.

Originality/value

Building upon behavioural finance and institutional theory, this paper posits that, in addition to a rational evaluation of the economics of the investment opportunities, various non-financial factors affect the household's decision to invest in renewables.

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Case study

Shubham , Shashank Mittal and Atri Sengupta

Organizational behavior, Organizational leadership, Organizational transformation.

Abstract

Subject area

Organizational behavior, Organizational leadership, Organizational transformation.

Study level/applicability

First year management students in the course Organizational Behavior (OB). Final year management students in the elective course on leadership and change management. Middle level managers who are working in industry, in the management development program related to change leadership and change management.

Case overview

This case deals with the transformation of the public distribution system (PDS) under the leadership of Dr Raman Singh. The PDS system was an inefficient system and the food grain supply intended for the poor was diverted by intermediaries before reaching the intended beneficiaries. Having experiences in central government ministries as a cabinet minister, Dr Raman Singh decided to transform the PDS. The challenges faced were primarily from that of the reticent bureaucracy and dealing with them requires patience and the skills of a transformational and motivational leader which Dr Raman Singh possessed.

Expected learning outcomes

This case intends to develop understanding of various dimensions related to transformational and motivational styles of leadership. Further, it intends to develop understanding of crucial institutional and organizational changes and how leaders bring about these changes in sync with technological and process changes.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 6: Human Resource Management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Atri Sengupta, Shashank Mittal and Kuchi Sanchita

Rapid advancement of data science has disrupted both business and employees in organizations. However, extant literature primarily focuses on the organizational level…

Abstract

Purpose

Rapid advancement of data science has disrupted both business and employees in organizations. However, extant literature primarily focuses on the organizational level phenomena, and has almost ignored the employee/individual perspective. This study thereby intends to capture the experiences of mid-level managers about these disruptions vis a vis their corresponding actions.

Design/methodology/approach

In a small-sample qualitative research design, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was adopted to capture this individual-level phenomenon. Twelve mid-level managers from large-scale Indian organizations that have extensively adopted data science tools and techniques participated in a semi-structured and in-depth interview process.

Findings

Our findings unfolded several perspectives gained from their experiences, leading thereby to two emergent person-job (mis)fit process models. (1) Managers, who perceived demands-abilities misfit (D-A misfit) as a growth-alignment opportunity vis a vis their corresponding actions, which effectively trapped them into a vicious cycle; and (2) the managers, who considered D-A misfit as a psychological strain vis a vis their corresponding actions, which engaged them into a benevolent cycle.

Research limitations/implications

The present paper has major theoretical and managerial implications in the field of human resource management and business analytics.

Practical implications

The findings advise managers that the focus should be on developing an organizational learning eco-system, which would enable mid-level managers to gain their confidence and control over their job and work environment in the context of data science disruptions. Importantly, organizations should facilitate integrated workplace learning (both formal and informal) with an appropriate ecosystem to help mid-level managers to adapt to the data-science disruptions.

Originality/value

The present study offers two emergent cyclic models to the existing person–job fit literature in the context of data science disruptions. A scant attention of the earlier researchers on how individual employees actually experience disruption, and the corresponding IPA method used in the present study may add significant value to the extant literature. Further, it opens a timely and relevant future research avenues in the context of data science disruptions.

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Article

Sanjay Kumar Singh, Shashank Mittal, Atri Sengupta and Rabindra Kumar Pradhan

This study aims to examine a dual-pathway model that recognizes two distinct (formal and informal) but complementary mechanisms of knowledge exchanges – knowledge sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine a dual-pathway model that recognizes two distinct (formal and informal) but complementary mechanisms of knowledge exchanges – knowledge sharing and knowledge helping. It also investigates how team members use their limited human and psychosocial capital for prosocial knowledge effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based approach was used to examine the hypotheses of the study. A moderated-mediation model was proposed and tested using bootstrap approach.

Findings

Knowledge sharing and knowledge helping were found to be the significant links through which human capital (capability) and psychosocial capital (motivation and efficacy) significantly predict prosocial knowledge effectiveness. Post hoc analysis suggests that human capital through knowledge sharing influences team learning, whereas the psychosocial capital through knowledge helping influences team leadership.

Originality/value

The present study found two distinct but complementary and yet necessary mechanisms of knowledge exchanges to be linked as the important outlay for the human and psychosocial capital to be effective in the prosocial knowledge behaviours.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Shashank Mittal

Organizations learn semi-automatically through experience or consciously through deliberate learning efforts. As there seems to be a “black-box” in the possible linkages…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations learn semi-automatically through experience or consciously through deliberate learning efforts. As there seems to be a “black-box” in the possible linkages between deliberate learning and new practice implementation, this paper aims to develop and test a process model, linking deliberate learning and new practice implementation through complementary competencies of task and environmental flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a field study, health-care improvement program (to transfer the improvement training program for new practice implementation) of 186 HCUs was used for testing our hypothesis. In addition to descriptive statistics, multiple hierarchical regressions and bootstrapping were used to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

Findings suggest that deliberate learning is positively and significantly related with new practice implementation, and dynamic capabilities in the form of task and environmental flexibility mediates this relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The present study makes theoretical and practical contributions by linking literature from new practice, organizational learning and dynamic capabilities; and by delving into the deliberate learning activities undertaken by health-care units.

Originality/value

Organizational learning in health care has almost become inevitable today due to the ever-changing dynamics of the industry. Barring handful of studies, the current state of literature is almost entirely tilted towards experience-based learning and deliberate learning is not well studied. To address this gap, the study aims to develop and test a process model linking development of dynamic capabilities with deliberate learning and new practice implementation. Further, findings of this study will help organizations and managers to understand and thereby effectively manage new practice implementation process through the use of deliberate activities.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Shashank Mittal

This study aims to investigate the specific role of the components of ability-based emotional intelligence (their relative importance) in building different aspects of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the specific role of the components of ability-based emotional intelligence (their relative importance) in building different aspects of career adaptabilities and job-search success of university students.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed survey data from 729 full-time students enrolled in an Indian university. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses, and the size of indirect effect was tested using SPSS PROCESS macro.

Findings

The ability-based emotional intelligence, along with the use and regulation of emotion in job-search success, plays a significant role in shaping career adaptabilities and job-search success. The ability to use and regulate emotions does have its impact on job-search success through a self-regulatory psychological resource of control and confidence over one's career. Self-emotional appraisal is necessary for an individual to be concerned for a career which forms the initiation of any job-search.

Research limitations/implications

Ability-based approach of enhancing emotional intelligence allows the university students to take a developmental approach in employment. This approach benefits the more “targeted approach to training interventions” provided by various stakeholders in the university, associated with career and employment.

Originality/value

Further, the study focuses on the psychological difficulties (over operational) faced by students in their employment endeavour. Both emotions and psychological resources are believed to play an important role in the career intervention. For instance, past researches have studied trait-based emotional intelligence as a personality construct. However, this study considers emotional intelligence as an ability-based aspect of intelligence, which “readily lends itself to interventions that can be enhanced through targeted training, coaching or counselling”.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Case study

Shubham , Vinay Kumar Kalakbandi and Shashank Mittal

The case may give students experience with the types of a situation they may encounter when running their own companies or serving as consultants in terms of identifying…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case may give students experience with the types of a situation they may encounter when running their own companies or serving as consultants in terms of identifying relevant information and appropriate approaches to dealing with local communities in projects involving the exploration and exploitation of natural resources. The case encourages students to critique the strategy of a firm in managing their different stakeholders. The case may also enhance their understanding of the “new” roles expected of corporations when engaging in projects involving local communities in developing countries. The case can be used to promote awareness of the social and environmental impact of industries associated with the exploration and exploitation of natural resources. Within developed or developing countries, master’s students are often employed by multinational corporations, many of which operate in natural resource industries. A greater understanding of the economic, social, and environmental challenges inherent in corporate social responsibilities programs in these industries may enhance their ability to deal with such situations. Such students are also increasingly likely to find work with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) helping local communities deal with largescale projects and confront major corporations.

Case overview/synopsis

The case is about the POSCO-India’s project to build 12 MTPA integrated steel plant in the Indian state of Odisha in 2005. The case presents the history of the project, recognizing the different stakeholders groups, the perspectives and interests of different stakeholders groups, the various actions taken by POSCO-India, and the results of the various engagement efforts of POSCO to develop the project. The case deals with the perspective of POSCO-India, Government of Odisha (GoO) and the local community getting affected by POSCO’s project on the issues of social, environmental, and economic sustainability. The case also discusses POSCO’s effort to engage with the local community and state government. The case tries to analyze the issues that come with developing big infrastructure projects. The case provides a framework for evaluating the complexity in engaging with the different stakeholder groups. The paper uses a framework for analyzing stakeholders based on their power, legitimacy, and urgency of their claims. The case will also demonstrate the complex institutional set-up in emerging markets and due to which sometimes it becomes difficult for organizations to implement such exploration projects to fulfill their social and environmental commitments. Finally, the case helps students to explore the implications of large-scale industrial projects especially in developing countries and analyze critically the corporate-society relationship.

Complexity academic level

The case was developed for master’s level course in business strategy, consulting, business policy, corporate governance, and corporate social responsibility, business ethics, and corporate sustainability in a 90 minutes session.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Shashank Mittal

This study aims to look at the interaction dynamics among engineering professionals from the lens of status hierarchies and derive on the role of intragroup conflicts…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to look at the interaction dynamics among engineering professionals from the lens of status hierarchies and derive on the role of intragroup conflicts prevalent in engineering teams. It develops and tests a comprehensive moderated-mediation model combining interpersonal status dynamics (of talent and conflicts prevalent within the team) with team external power dynamics (with other teams) and their resultant effect on team performance through the intragroup conflicts.

Design/methodology/approach

Data at team level from 1,265 members belonging to 218 engineering teams were used for hypothesis testing.

Findings

Process and status conflicts fully explain the negative effect of having more talented members in teams on team performance. High talented teams have lower levels of process and status conflicts and higher levels of performance when they have high power.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the literature on engineering teams, team status, power and conflicts.

Practical implications

This paper advises manager on where to exactly look for problems in the internal working of talented teams and conditions that could negatively impact their performance.

Originality/value

Research on teams’ internal composition and team performance link remains inconclusive. The established pattern of thinking in both practice and research is that having more talented members in the engineering teams is attached to superior performance. Whereas it is often the case that even after having multiple talented members, teams are not able to perform well. With some exceptions, studies have not paid attention to the dynamics of having more talented members and its flip side on team performance.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article

Shashank Mittal

Potential appraisal is the foremost indicator of employee's readiness to take higher responsibilities and used for multiple purposes in promotion, human resource…

Abstract

Purpose

Potential appraisal is the foremost indicator of employee's readiness to take higher responsibilities and used for multiple purposes in promotion, human resource development including training and development needs of employees. This study examines how construal level as psychological difference among employees (holistic–analytic differential in preference of thinking for various action domains among individuals) and meaningfulness of work is related to their readiness for development and responsibility. Combining meaning of work literature and cognitive psychology, the moderated mediation model is formed to examine the psychological process and social boundary conditions in the relationship between construal level and potential appraisal of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 1,494 working executives and their 297 reporting managers across companies operating in an industrial cluster situated in India. The proposed model considered “experienced meaningfulness” as mediator and contextual factors of psychological empowerment and supervisor feedback as moderators.

Findings

Using multi-variate analysis and after controlling for industry type and experience, supervisor potential appraisal ratings of employees are found to be statistically related to construal level, and this relationship is found to be partially mediated by “experienced meaningfulness” of work. Further, contextual factors are found to be significant as moderators.

Originality/value

By bringing the subjective interpretation of different aspects of meaning of work from work design literature to examine its role in relationship between aspects of cognitive psychology and potential appraisal of employees, this study bridges the gap between cognitive psychology of development, meaning of work literature and HRD literature. Further implications for academic literature and managers are discussed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article

Shubham Singh and Shashank Mittal

Differences in institutional environment and governance structures pave the way for heterogeneous nature of different businesses; this, in turn, shapes the way various…

Abstract

Purpose

Differences in institutional environment and governance structures pave the way for heterogeneous nature of different businesses; this, in turn, shapes the way various sections of society act toward each other enacting their responsibilities. Taking into account the unique institutional environment and governance structures of firms in developing economies, this paper aims to build on the “stakeholder theory” to address the issue of the implementation of corporate social responsibilities (CSR) practices in these economies, particularly India. This paper also aims to uncover the saliency (legitimacy and power) of different stakeholder groups on different aspects of a firm’s CSR activities. Further, as most of the firms in developing economies are family-run firms, the paper examines role of organizational leadership in shaping firms’ CSR strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating literature on “stakeholder theory” and CSR, this paper examines the implementation of different CSR practices by family-run firms in India. This paper uses survey research to collect data from 80 privately held family firms operating in apparel and textiles industry in India. The data have been collected from respondents holding top leadership positions in the sample firms.

Findings

The findings indicate that pressure from primary stakeholders (i.e. customers, employees and shareholders) and CSR-oriented leadership belief significantly influence organizational implementation of CSR practices, whereas pressure from secondary stakeholder (i.e. community groups and non-governmental organizations) was found to be insignificant. Further, CSR-oriented leadership belief moderated the relationship between primary stakeholder pressure and organizational implementation of CSR practices. The findings equally highlighted lower saliency of secondary stakeholder’s legitimacy and power because of weak institutional mechanisms, while on the other hand, the primary stakeholders exert considerable power because of the direct nature of transactional legitimacy, further accentuated by the governance structure in family firms.

Originality/value

This paper is among the very few studies that address the issue of CSR among family-run businesses in developing economies. Existing frameworks on analyzing firm’s implementation of CSR practices does not recognize the inherent heterogeneity among different stakeholder groups. Recognizing that different stakeholders have different levels of influence over firms, this paper categorized the stakeholders’ groups into primary and secondary to analyze their differential impact over firms. Additionally, given the critical role of leadership belief in the implementation of CSR practices, this paper analyzed the moderated effect of CSR-oriented leadership belief toward developing a more robust model of CSR implementation.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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