Search results

1 – 8 of 8
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Shan Jin, Beth Clark, Wenjing Li, Sharron Kuznesof and Lynn J. Frewer

Scientists' perceptions of societal needs and priorities will shape the innovation trajectories of synthetic biology (SB). In turn, these will be shaped by the funding and…

Abstract

Purpose

Scientists' perceptions of societal needs and priorities will shape the innovation trajectories of synthetic biology (SB). In turn, these will be shaped by the funding and regulatory environments in which their research is conducted. This study intends to investigate scientists' perspectives on co-innovation with the public regarding implementation of pathways associated with SB including its agrifood applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Chinese and EU scientists (N = 9 and 13, respectively). Six prominent themes emerged from the data based on thematic analysis method.

Findings

Both Chinese and EU scientists regarded SB as being high-benefit, low-risk and ethically acceptable, and predicted its rejection by the general public and attributed this to the public's knowledge deficit and irrationality. They endorsed the deficit model of science communication, independent of greater emphasis on responsible research and innovation (RRI) in EU research projects. The findings raised concerns that public fears might intensify once they have learned about scientists' biased risk perceptions of SB; this calls for better involvement of broader stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

As the sample size is relatively small, the generalisation of research findings needs to be cautious. However, the authors believe the findings have provided some insights that support increasingly RRI associated with SB.

Originality/value

This study has presented scientists' misunderstandings of societal responses to SB and science communication. It has also provided information to understand how SB-related issues and agenda can be better shaped in future.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Barbara J Stewart–Knox, Audrey Rankin, Brendan P Bunting, Lynn J Frewer, Carlos Celis-Morales, Katherine M Livingstone, Arnout R.H. Fischer, Rui Poínhos, Sharron Kuznesof, Mike J Gibney and John C. Mathers

Randomised controlled trials identify causal links between variables but not why an outcome has occurred. This analysis sought to determine how psychological factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Randomised controlled trials identify causal links between variables but not why an outcome has occurred. This analysis sought to determine how psychological factors assessed at baseline influenced response to personalised nutrition.

Design/methodology/approach

Web-based, randomised, controlled trial (RCT) was conducted across seven European countries. Volunteers, both male and female, aged over 18 years were randomised to either a non-personalised (control) or a personalised (treatment) dietary advice condition. Linear mixed model analysis with fixed effects was used to compare associations between internal and external health locus of control (HLoC), nutrition self-efficacy (NS-E) and self-report habit index (S-RHI) at baseline (N = 1444), with healthy eating index (HEI) and Mediterranean diet index (MDI) scores between conditions post-intervention (N = 763).

Findings

An increase in MDI scores was observed between baseline and six months in the treatment group which was associated with higher NS-E (p < 0.001), S-RHI (p < 0.001) and external HLoC (p < 0.001). Increase in HEI between baseline and six months in the treatment group was associated with higher NS-E (p < 0.001) and external HLoC (p = 0.009). Interaction between time and condition indicated increased HEI scores (p < 0.001), which were associated with higher S-RHI scores in the treatment than control group (p = 0.032). Internal HLoC had no effect on MDI or HEI.

Originality/value

Psychological factors associated with behaviour change need consideration when tailoring dietary advice. Those with weaker habit strength will require communication focussed upon establishing dietary habits and support in integrating advised changes into daily routine. Information on habit strength can also be used to inform how progress towards dietary goals is monitored and fed back to the individual. Those with stronger habit strength are more likely to benefit from personalised nutrition.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Susan Miles, Mary Brennan, Sharron Kuznesof, Mitchell Ness, Christopher Ritson and Lynn J. Frewer

Consumers may encounter a number of potential food hazards through their food choice decisions and consumption behaviour. It is psychologically determined risk perceptions…

4856

Abstract

Consumers may encounter a number of potential food hazards through their food choice decisions and consumption behaviour. It is psychologically determined risk perceptions that drive acceptance of such potential food hazards, and define people's risk‐taking or self‐protective behaviours. As such, it is necessary to understand exactly what consumers are worried about. Food issues of concern to consumers were identified in a previous exploratory focus group study. A list of 18 food safety issues was developed for the purpose of the study reported here, with the aim of comparing worry about the different issues and investigating any demographic differences. Factor analysis indicated that attitudes to the 18 food safety issues reflected two underlying constructs, the first relating to technological food issues and the second to lifestyle food issues. In general, people were more worried about technological food hazards compared to lifestyle hazards. Demographic differences were observed for gender, age and social class, but not for geographical region, or having children; furthermore, experience of food allergy or intolerance increased worry about technological issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Sharron Kuznesof, Angela Tregear and Andrew Moxey

Investigates consumer perceptions of “regional foods” in England. Results show understandings of regional foods to be a complex dynamic of interrelated concepts. Regional…

10979

Abstract

Investigates consumer perceptions of “regional foods” in England. Results show understandings of regional foods to be a complex dynamic of interrelated concepts. Regional foods are defined by place and human‐related factors. An implicit factor in attitudes towards regional food is the “perceived authenticity” of the various product attributes by the consumer. Regional foods are characterized as “regional products” (high‐value, speciality or hand‐crafted products) and “regional recipes” (dishes readily associated with home preparation and cooking). Proposes that findings have implications for marketing, in particular product differentiation and communication. Implications are discussed for food producers and retailers, and recommendations are made for future research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Sharron Kuznesof and Christopher Ritson

This study employs a focus group methodology to examine the factors affecting the acceptability of gene technology in food production, using genetically modified (GM…

3942

Abstract

This study employs a focus group methodology to examine the factors affecting the acceptability of gene technology in food production, using genetically modified (GM) farmed salmon as a focus for the research. The results identified a small group of “triers” ‐ willing to try any GM food product, and a small group of “refusers” ‐ rejecting the technology and derivative products. For the middle majority of “undecided” consumers, the decision to accept or reject GM food products was based on a number of interrelated factors, associated with the food product and the benefits conferred.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Caron Lacey, Beth Clark, Lynn Frewer and Sharron Kuznesof

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers to, and implications of, salt reduction initiatives within the UK food manufacturing industry.

2250

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers to, and implications of, salt reduction initiatives within the UK food manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 13 technical and new product development (NPD) managers were purposefully sampled from businesses supplying foods within the chilled convenience food sector. Data were generated using semi-structured interviews incorporating the critical incident technique. Thematic and comparative analyses identified similarities and differences in the challenges facing different product categories within the sector.

Findings

Barriers to further salt reduction included: manufacturing limitations; NPD constraints; food safety, quality and shelf-life trade-offs; and organoleptic acceptance. No single barrier dominated industry concerns and many barriers were interlinked. Overarching issues of competitive inequality between signatories and non-participants to voluntary salt reduction agreements, and the experience of product reformulation having reached its limits were prevalent.

Originality/value

This research provides a food industry perspective on the identified barriers faced by UK food processors and manufacturers in advancing salt reduction within the chilled convenience sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Angela Tregear, Suzanne Dobson, Mary Brennan and Sharron Kuznesof

“Theory versus practice” and “rigour versus relevance” debates have long been a feature of the discipline of marketing, not least within the sub‐field of marketing…

1219

Abstract

Purpose

“Theory versus practice” and “rigour versus relevance” debates have long been a feature of the discipline of marketing, not least within the sub‐field of marketing education, where authors have increasingly called for the adoption of more critical approaches as a means to enhance undergraduate degrees. To date, however, little is actually known about how undergraduate programmes are perceived by those who deliver them. The aim of this research is to investigate educators' views of the primary purpose of undergraduate degrees, and their perceptions and experiences of critical approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of 23 exploratory interviews was conducted, followed by a national survey of UK marketing educators. For the main phase of data analysis, multivariate techniques were employed.

Findings

Respondents generally agreed that intellectual rigour is a priority in marketing education. However, significant differences in opinion were identified on the extent to which degrees actually provide this, the extent to which students should be treated as customers, and whether curricula should be driven by industry. In terms of critical approaches, the majority of staff rated such approaches as important to undergraduate programmes, and most had introduced at least one type in their own teaching. There were no significant differences in ratings and experiences of critical approaches between those respondents who emphasised industry relevance in marketing education and the rest.

Originality/value

The divergence of views revealed by the research raises important questions about how marketing is currently positioned to different stakeholders, and how the discipline may evolve in future.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Mitchell Ness, Matthew Gorton and Sharron Kuznesof

Although students have several characteristics in common with the 18‐24 year old youth group, they have many distinguishing features and merit consideration as a separate…

8902

Abstract

Although students have several characteristics in common with the 18‐24 year old youth group, they have many distinguishing features and merit consideration as a separate segment. Yet very little academic research has looked at the student market although over recent years commercial marketers have begun to take more interest in this group. The paper reports the results of a study of student food shopping behaviour. It is concerned especially with establishing the dimensions underlying the importance that students attach to supermarket store attributes, exploring the existence of student segments and subsequently, to profile the segments in terms of shopping behaviour and attitudes to store features. The empirical results indicate that there are four dimensions that underlie the importance of store features. These are defined respectively as economy, finance, products, personnel and access. Subsequently, two clusters are identified. The cluster profiles indicate that the clusters are distinguished by their financial situation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8