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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Sharon Purchase, Christina Kum and Doina Olaru

The purpose of this study is to investigate sequences of event and the resulting innovation paths and trajectories followed by a university spin-off organization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate sequences of event and the resulting innovation paths and trajectories followed by a university spin-off organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A single longitudinal case study methodology was applied to analyze innovation events and paths along the trajectory. Narrative methods were used to analyze actor perceptions on innovation processes/events.

Findings

The study categorizes events and paths in two categories, technical and commercialization, and finds that lock-in events matter for convergence of an innovation trajectory. The results indicate that understanding critical events may assist timely interventions in the innovation paths, thus potentially avoiding disruptions of the development of an innovation trajectory. The temporal processes reveal contrasting convergence–divergence patterns in the trajectory, depending on the types of events that occur.

Research limitations/implications

Using a single case data may limit the applicability of the findings, which calls for future research.

Practical implications

Industries could monitor the technical and commercialization paths as a strategy to reduce “vulnerability” of the innovation trajectory and possible negative impacts. Knowledge about the role of the CEO is key for a university spin-off organization.

Originality/value

This study presents a new typology of events and paths, identifies and characterizes lock-in events and shows the relatively fragile dexterity between convergent and divergent paths along an innovation trajectory.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Lyndie Bayne, Sharon Purchase and Geoffrey N. Soutar

The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of how change in environmental practices occurs in business networks. The study examines what types of network…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of how change in environmental practices occurs in business networks. The study examines what types of network change processes occur in bringing about environmental change. Further, the basic change process theory types (life-cycle, teleology, dialectics and evolution) involved in the change processes are analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple, embedded, network case study was undertaken in the Australian agrifood sector, focusing on the pork and dairy industries.

Findings

Change was found to occur through the interaction of multiple network processes operating simultaneously and sequentially over time. Thirteen network process categories were identified, grouped further into legislative, business case and altruistic overarching motivations. Legislative change processes emphasize the need for continued government intervention through enforced legislation. Teleology and dialectics were common at the beginning of many change processes, followed by life-cycle theory types.

Originality/value

The study brings together change process conceptualizations from prior unconnected literatures into a comprehensive change process categorization framework. Examining changes in the activity dimension adds to network dynamics literature previously focusing on changes in the actor and resource dimensions. Contributions are made to processual research methods by theoretically and empirically clarifying connections between events, activities and processes. Analyzing the underlying change process theory types at the network level adds to both management and business network literature. Finally, the study answers calls to study sustainability issues at a network level.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2020

Bella Butler and Sharon Purchase

This paper aims to investigate business network activity patterns and how they change when actors experience tensions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate business network activity patterns and how they change when actors experience tensions.

Design/methodology/approach

Four tensions, developed from previous literature, are considered in relation to how they influence activity patterns. A longitudinal case study focusing on the modernization of an international airport illustrates how tensions experienced by actors influence changes in activity patterns.

Findings

Results highlight that when tensions in relation to network position are experienced activity patterns are more likely to break and form new patterns. When multiple tensions are experienced within the same period, an old activity pattern is more likely to be broken and the new activity pattern develop.

Research limitations/implications

Contributions in relation to interdependencies between activities heighten the impact of changes leading to the breaking of existing patterns, particularly the importance of coordination activities. These findings are context specific because activity patterns vary according to the industry.

Practical implications

Practical implications indicate that understanding network interdependences within the change process is important, particularly for co-ordination activities. The study informs practitioners about possible outcomes while tensions are experienced. This study found that when actors are experiencing multiple tensions, breaking of activity patterns is more likely to occur while experience less tensions extending existing activity patterns becoming more likely.

Originality/value

Contributions are made in relation to gaps in investigating the business network activity layer and their changes in relation to tensions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Lyndie Bayne, Sharon Purchase and Ann Tarca

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the use of power in a business network context is investigated, in relation to companies’ environmental reporting and practice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the use of power in a business network context is investigated, in relation to companies’ environmental reporting and practice choices. Second, the environmental reporting-practice portrayal gap is examined, focussing on inter-organisational environmental practices (such as green supply chain management).

Design/methodology/approach

A network case study was undertaken in the Western Australian agrifood sector, with the two large, dominant supermarkets as focal actors. Data were drawn from 34 in-depth interviews from 2011 to 2013 and a document review including 15 years of supermarket reports.

Findings

The study showed the exercise of government power bases and its effect on supermarket and other supply chain actors’ reporting and practice choices. The data suggest a differential use of power by supermarkets with suppliers, depending on supplier type and environmental practice characteristics. The study revealed surprisingly transparent reporting of the lack of whole-of-supply-chain approach by the supermarkets and admission of shareholder power over reporting and practice choices. In addition, other reporting-practice portrayal gaps relating to inter-organisational environmental practices were found.

Originality/value

The study provides a unique network level analysis of how power relations interact and influence companies’ choices of environmental reporting and practice, thereby contributing to prior power and environmental reporting literature. Contributions are made to extant literature dealing with the reporting-practice portrayal gap by focussing on inter-organisational environmental reporting and practice.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Theingi Theingi, Hla Theingi and Sharon Purchase

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how institutional mechanisms operate within both formal and informal channels of cross-border remittance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how institutional mechanisms operate within both formal and informal channels of cross-border remittance.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face interviews were conducted with Myanmar migrants mostly working in Thailand. Thematic coding was used to analyze field notes and identify themes in channel member perceptions and institutional environmental process.

Findings

Informal money transfer channels have achieved higher levels of legitimacy when compared to formal channels. Channel legitimacy is a more important attribute than efficiency. Lack of financial infrastructure, such as bank branches and ATM machines particularly in rural or outlying areas of Myanmar, the requirements for formal documentation and language and communication are the major institutional constraints that encourage the development and use of multiple channels in Myanmar. Formal money transfer channels develop with stronger regulative institutional processes, whereas informal money transfer channels develop with stronger cultural-cognitive and normative institutional processes.

Research limitations/implications

Using convenience sample of remitters mainly from one area of Thailand and other channel members from Yangon, the financial capital of Myanmar, may limit the applicability of the findings, which calls for future research.

Practical implications

Banks and money transfer offices need to improve legitimacy perception within migrant communities by building stronger networks with local banks and international banks. They could provide Myanmar speaking front-line service personnel and include brochures in the Myanmar language to improve the communication process. The findings and recommendations from this study are also applicable to informal channels and formal financial institutions in other ASEAN countries that are preparing to make investments in Myanmar. Moreover, Myanmar banks should also consider opening branches to cater for Myanmar workers in ASEAN, especially in Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia.

Originality value

This paper applies institutional theory within channels, investigates the context of a financial channel rather than a product channel, addresses the importance of institutional environmental mechanisms and constraints in influencing channel behavior and is embedded in the situational context of Myanmar, a newly opened South-East Asian economy where little prior research has been conducted.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Hussain Albin Shaikh, Sharon Purchase and Gregory Brush

The purpose of this study is to understand the development of social capital in an Arab business environment, and provide an in-depth description of the nature and role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the development of social capital in an Arab business environment, and provide an in-depth description of the nature and role of three key Arabic business relationship characteristics (ehsan, et-moone and wasta), their impact on each other and key influencing factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research design was used, in which face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with innovation teams (22 team members) at six industrial small and medium-sized enterprises in Saudi Arabia. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analyzed (thematic coding) through NVivo.

Findings

The findings suggest that wasta, ehsan and et-moone align closely with the three social capital dimensions (structural, cognitive and relational); thus, developing these three relationship characteristics most likely results in developing social capital. The findings also expand the description of the three business relationship characteristics. Moreover, ehsan, et-moone and wasta appear to influence each other, and are affected by other factors such as an individual’s age and position, and the duration of the relationship. Ehsan has a positive influence on the development of et-moone, while the existence of et-moone appears to be necessary for the establishment of wasta-capital. A high level of ehsan might influence the relationship between et-moone and wasta-use and limit the negative usage of wasta.

Practical implications

International managers can improve the level of ehsan in their organizational and business relationships through assigning incentives and playing the role of moral champion to encourage ehsan behavior. Managers aiming to increase et-moone may choose team members with a high level of ehsan, emphasizing the development of personal relationships, and providing opportunities for socialization both inside and outside the workplace. A high level of ehsan and et-moone will assist managers to develop and use wasta.

Originality/value

This study makes a threefold contribution to the literature. First, it provides an expanded description of the three Arabic business relationship characteristics and how they align closely with the dimensions of social capital. Wasta aligns with the structural dimension and ehsan aligns with the cognitive dimension, while et-moone aligns closely with the relational dimension. Second, it suggests and shows how the three relationship characteristics might interact with each other. Ehsan appears to influence et-moone, and also the relationship between et-moone and wasta. Et-moone appears to have a positive influence on wasta use. Third, the findings also indicate that there might be other factors (e.g. age and position) that influence the interactions between the three business relationship characteristics.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Ken Dooley and Sharon Purchase

Research indicates that e-procurement is being implemented slowly in many organizations, especially government organizations. This article investigates positive factors…

Abstract

Research indicates that e-procurement is being implemented slowly in many organizations, especially government organizations. This article investigates positive factors influencing e-procurement intentions within semi-government organizations. A web-based survey was carried out on Australian government purchasing professional's perspectives of e-procurement. Findings from a multiple regression analysis indicate that suppliers' participation, internal managerial support and the perceived benefits gained through implementation all influence e-procurement intentions.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2007

Tanuja Singh, Geoffrey Gordon and Sharon Purchase

This study empirically examines the role of the Internet in global business‐to‐business (B2B) marketing strategies of Multinational Corporations (MNCs) based in the United…

Abstract

This study empirically examines the role of the Internet in global business‐to‐business (B2B) marketing strategies of Multinational Corporations (MNCs) based in the United States and Australia. The results demonstrate that uses of the Internet in a global B2B setting often parallel its domestic uses but that variables that facilitate or inhibit its implementation for global operations are somewhat different in global markets. The findings suggest that MNCs in the two countries are using the Internet in their global B2B operations predominantly for business enhancement purposes as compared to revenue enhancement. Results also show that for global B2B operations, the Internet is viewed by MNCs as a tool to enhance competitive intelligence, streamline operations, and enhance the marketing processes. It is also deemed essential for a firm’s long‐term competitive stance by large as well as small and medium‐sized MNCs.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Doina Olaru, Sharon Purchase and Nathan Peterson

The paper aims to fill a gap in the literature in relation to the determinants of customer value within the research and development (R&D) industry and word‐of‐mouth. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to fill a gap in the literature in relation to the determinants of customer value within the research and development (R&D) industry and word‐of‐mouth. It investigates whether context specific variables, such as organizational type and contract length, change customer value evaluations and the value – intention to repurchase – recommend system.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of Australian customers of a research and development service organization was conducted. Structural equation modelling was used to develop a model investigating factors that affect customer value, intent to re‐purchase, and word‐of‐mouth/recommendation.

Findings

Relationship benefits, service benefits and sacrifice all had a significant influence on customer value. Efficient use of time is crucial for sacrifice evaluation. Relationship benefits were larger for government organizations than private organizations. Importance of value to recommend the organization to others was higher for longer contracts and government customers.

Research limitation/implications

Results show that R&D organizations need to concentrate on both the technical service/science aspects and the relationship aspects in their contracts. Government institutions tended to emphasize the relationship benefits while private businesses considered service benefits, relationship benefits and sacrifice nearly equal in their determination of value. Intent to contract R&D organization for further work and the willingness to recommend it to others as a highly specialized and competent service provider seem to be higher for government customers and longer contracts.

Originality/value

This paper investigates customer value in a little researched industry, R&D. The findings are relevant for similar professional business‐to‐business services.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Sharon Purchase, Sara Denize and Doina Olaru

This chapter outlines a method for developing simulation code from case-based data using narrative sequence analysis. This analytical method allows researchers to…

Abstract

This chapter outlines a method for developing simulation code from case-based data using narrative sequence analysis. This analytical method allows researchers to systematically specify the ‘real-world’ behaviours and causal mechanisms that describe the research problem and translate this mechanism into simulation code. An illustrative example of the process used for code development from case-based data is detailed using a well-documented case of photovoltaic innovation. Narrative sequence analysis is used to analyse case data. Micro-sequences are identified and simplified. Each micro-sequence is presented first in pseudo-code and then in simulation code. This chapter demonstrates the coding process using Netlogo code. Narrative sequence analysis provides a rigorous and systematic approach to identifying the underlying mechanisms to be described when building simulation models. This analytical technique also provides necessary and sufficient information to write simulation code. This chapter addresses a current gap in the methodology literature by including case data within agent-based model building processes. It benefits B2B marketing researchers by outlining guiding processes and principles in the use of case-based data to build simulation models.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

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