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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Jennifer Mullan, Laura Bradley and Sharon Loane

Bank adoption of mobile banking globally remains sporadic. Factors influencing this remain under researched. The purpose of this paper is to explore drivers and barriers…

Abstract

Purpose

Bank adoption of mobile banking globally remains sporadic. Factors influencing this remain under researched. The purpose of this paper is to explore drivers and barriers of bank adoption of mobile banking from a stakeholder perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Using diffusion of innovation (DOI), a mixed method study was conducted. Data were collected using blogging to inform a two-round modified Delphi study. The opinion of 72 members from six stakeholder industries was sought.

Findings

The results indicate that DOI theory is still applicable within mobile environments in helping to understand the diffusion of mobile banking. Key drivers of bank adoption were global mobile phone penetration, competitive advantage, customer convenience, strategic importance, customer demand, low perceived risk/security concerns and stakeholder partnerships. Findings suggest low levels of customer demand and lack of return on investment (ROI) are key barriers for banks. The findings have strategic implications for industry players highlighting the importance of mobile banking to maintain market share and customer relations. These influences will inform successful mobile banking strategies by raising awareness of major barriers.

Originality/value

This study concentrates on a bank/stakeholder perspective. It confirms that DOI theory is still applicable within mobile environments. It extends understanding of bank adoption providing useful information for all stakeholders. It has implications for banks regarding multi-channel banking and the motivators and challenges influencing its adoption.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Ko‐Min Kevin Tseng and Rhona E. Johnsen

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the influence of the internet on the internationalisation process and international customer relationship interactions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the influence of the internet on the internationalisation process and international customer relationship interactions of UK manufacturing small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). The paper is positioned at the interface of the literature on international entrepreneurship and the internet.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the findings from multiple case studies of ten UK manufacturing SMEs from a variety of UK sectors, producing high‐, medium‐ and low‐tech offerings. In‐depth interviews with directors or managers of the SMEs were conducted. Individual and cross‐case analysis was carried out using coding frameworks to reduce and analyse the data and capture patterns in the findings.

Findings

The findings reveal how the influence of the internet in the internationalisation process and international customer relationship interactions differed in the high‐, medium‐or low‐tech SME categories. The influence of the internet differed across three main dimensions: the way in which the SMEs invested in and used different internet applications for internationalisation and customer relationship support, the SMEs' perceptions of the internet as a tool to support communication with international customers; the SMEs' reliance on more personal and interactive forms of contact with international customers.

Practical implications

The results demonstrate that the level of technological advancement of an SME's offerings has an important bearing on how these firms adopt the internet in their internationalisation process and gain advantages in their international customer interactions. The managerial implications of the study are relevant for manufacturing SMEs, their customers and government agencies involved with SMEs.

Originality/value

This research is amongst the first empirical contributions to examine the themes of the internet, internationalisation and international customer interactions in UK manufacturing SMEs and to highlight the importance of the level of technological advancement of an SME's offerings in distinguishing the ways in which the internet is used by entrepreneurial small firms in their internationalisation process.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Sharon Loane

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Isobel Cunningham, Sharon Loane and Pat Ibbotson

This study aims to investigate the internationalisation strategies of small games development firms from Poland and Hungary.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the internationalisation strategies of small games development firms from Poland and Hungary.

Design/methodology/approach

This enquiry adopts a qualitative approach, whereby firms were identified from online searches, and secondary information was sought on each firm prior to in‐depth interview, in order to highlight the issues relating to internationalisation/growth.

Findings

The paper provides evidence that small games development firms undertake rapid internationalisation, despite resource constraints. Firms were founded by teams of entrepreneurs who unlike many other international entrepreneurs, did not have a priori experience, sometimes moving from being hobbyists into commercial operations. These often exist in a pre‐natal phase some years before formal incorporation, an important phase when many of the resources required are sourced. The findings show only partial support for RBV, as these firms were acquiring and controlling resources from their environment on a freelance and low commitment basis. The authors speculate that these firms display dynamic capabilities of the highest order in order to do so.

Research/limitations/implications

This enquiry adds to understanding of the (international) growth strategies of small games development firms, and gives insight into how they access dynamic capabilities. However, the number of firms investigated is small and from two Eastern European countries, therefore further larger scale research should be undertaken.

Originality/value

Based on this exploration new insights are developed with regard to an under researched sector, and how such firms undertake rapid internationational growth, despite being particularly resource constrained. In particular, the entrpreneurs in these firms have little experience and creatively acquire and control resources in order to grow rapidly. The authors speculate that they display advanced dynamic capabilities.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Margaret Fletcher and Sharon Loane

Abstract

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Natasha Evers

Drawing on the dynamic capabilities perspective and the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm, this paper seeks to further understanding of international new ventures…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the dynamic capabilities perspective and the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm, this paper seeks to further understanding of international new ventures (INVs) operating in a traditional low technology sector – an understudied context in international entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory research merited qualitative research as the chosen methodology. Multiple case study design and critical incident technique were the main qualitative techniques employed.

Findings

The case entrepreneurs' objective and subjective capabilities emerge as a critical key resource for strategically managing and developing the dynamic capabilities of the firm in areas of research and development (R&D), logistics and production. The firms' capability to adapt and renew themselves through product diversification strategies was also critical for sustainable competitive advantage in a highly turbulent and competitive sector of seafood.

Research limitations/implications

The study is sector‐specific and, while the sample size is small, findings are consistent. The paper presents a conceptual research framework for exploring further dynamic capabilities theory across diverse empirical high and low‐tech industry contexts.

Practical implications

Low technology sectors are considered a “forgotten sector” of innovation policies in small‐developed economies. Findings from this study identify a number of important implications of relevance to policy‐makers and managers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge and understanding of how INVs in traditionally low‐tech sectors develop competitive advantage on international markets. The study presents an entrepreneurial perspective to the dynamic capabilities theory of the firm and presents a conceptual research framework to further understanding on INVs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Sharon Loane and Jim Bell

The importance of networks in the internationalisation of entrepreneurial firms is widely accepted. However, while the literature tends to focus on the existing networks…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of networks in the internationalisation of entrepreneurial firms is widely accepted. However, while the literature tends to focus on the existing networks of firms, there is growing evidence that many rapid internationalisers have to build new networks. This cross‐national study investigates the networks of internationalising entrepreneurial firms in Australia, Canada, Ireland and New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐stage approach and mixed methods were employed. Online sources were used to gather information on 218 internationalising small firms, then an e‐mail instrument was administered to verify data and address information gaps, resulting in 143 usable responses (66 per cent) evenly distributed across locations. A representative sub‐sample of 53 firms was selected for further in‐depth investigation via face‐to‐face interviews with CEOs.

Findings

A high proportion of firms (25 per cent) actively used existing networks to develop their knowledge of international markets and improve their international competitiveness. However, an even larger number (34 per cent) had to build new networks because of the advanced nature of their offering. In‐depth interviews provided rich insights into the nature and scope of the firms' network development activities.

Research limitations/implications

While the sample size is relatively small, the findings are consistent across locations. They suggest that further investigation of network building activities among internationalising entrepreneurial firms is required.

Practical implications

The results have implications on firm strategy, in terms of the strategic nature of network building and the need for systematic approaches. They also are pertinent to public policy in support of internationalisation. In particular, there is a need for support agencies to shift their focus from providing objective knowledge to supporting experiential learning and network development.

Originality/value

The linkage of extant network approaches to the emerging knowledge‐based view (KBV) of internationalisation enhances and advances both perspectives.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Svante Andersson

The purpose of this study is to enhance the understanding of a born global firm's early internationalization process and the entrepreneur's decisions regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to enhance the understanding of a born global firm's early internationalization process and the entrepreneur's decisions regarding internationalization by using effectuation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative case study is used to explore whether effectuation theory is a fruitful alternative perspective compared with the dominant paradigm (causation), which is primarily used in earlier studies on born globals.

Findings

The study shows how a born global company could enter many markets in a short time, by co‐operating with local network partners. The founders' prior knowledge and networks were important to understand the rapid international expansion. Effectuation theory focuses on the entrepreneurs' ability to create opportunities together with network partners and is a useful tool to understand the development in the born global firm.

Research limitations/implications

The study shows that effectuation theory holds promise for developing the international entrepreneurship area. Future research is recommended to focus not only on the entrepreneur's competencies, but also on the entrepreneur's behavior, including during the time before they started the firm.

Practical implications

Decision‐makers in the early development of born global firms are recommended to use his/her own and his/her company's resources and network. Also advantage should be taken of opportunities when they are recognized or created, instead of focusing on traditional planning activities.

Originality/value

There are few studies that have used effectuation theory as a basis for understanding the early development of a born global firm.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Breda Kenny and John Fahy

This study aims to identify and examine the relationship between network resources and international performance of high tech small to medium‐sized enterprises (HTSME) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and examine the relationship between network resources and international performance of high tech small to medium‐sized enterprises (HTSME) in the telecommunications industry in Ireland. The network resource construct for this paper comprises three dimensions: network human capital resources, network resource combination, and information sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical research was carried out using a mail survey in which 154 firms completed and returned the questionnaire. Three hypotheses were analysed using structural equations modelling using LISREL.

Findings

The study's main finding suggests a positive relationship between a firm's network human capital resources and international performance. However, no support was found for the relationship between network resources combinations, information sharing and international performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross‐sectional, confined to a single industry and focused on the role of networks in the HTSME context only. Results from this study provide policy makers and practitioners with additional insights into specific network resource‐based factors that are associated with international performance for HTSMEs. Such an assessment would help identify specific areas of relationship strengths and weaknesses in terms of the level of human capital available to firms, the combinations of complementary resources across firms and the extent and level of information exchange between firms.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with a discussion of these findings and the overall implications for policy makers and managers. Specifically, it is necessary to identify and review the types of resources that are critical to the international performance of firms and develop and implement business strategies building on those resources in order to enhance the likelihood of international success.

Originality/value

This study offers a multiple dimensionality to the network resource concept by measuring the direct effect of the type of network resources in terms of human capital, information and network resource combinations on international performance of HTSMEs in the telecommunications industry. These findings advance network research by highlighting the trade‐offs that networks impose on firms that seek to manage and leverage their network resources.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2011

Sharon Loane and Jim Bell

As part of their growth strategy, many firms choose to expand internationally. Such expansion is an especially important decision for small- and medium-sized enterprises…

Abstract

As part of their growth strategy, many firms choose to expand internationally. Such expansion is an especially important decision for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). These SMEs are vital to China's economy and have grown in importance since the reform and opening-up, measured in terms of size, number, financial status, or profitability. In addition, the Chinese electronics sector plays an important role in the economy. This inquiry explores the internationalisation behaviour of 50 Chinese electronics SMEs. The findings are presented and implications drawn for future research, along with those for policy makers and practitioners.

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