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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Lucas J. Carr, Hotaka Maeda, Brandon Luther, Patrick Rider, Sharon J. Tucker and Christoph Leonhard

– The purpose of this paper is to test the user acceptability (Phase 1) and effects (Phase 2) of completing sedentary work while using a seated active workstation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the user acceptability (Phase 1) and effects (Phase 2) of completing sedentary work while using a seated active workstation.

Design/methodology/approach

In Phase 1, 45 sedentary employees completed an acceptability questionnaire immediately after performing sedentary work tasks (typing, mousing) while using the seated active workstation for 30 minutes. In Phase 2, the paper tested the differential effects of completing sedentary work tasks at two different workstations (sedentary workstation vs seated active workstation) on physiological (energy expenditure, muscle activity, heart rate, blood pressure), cognitive (learning, memory, attention) and work performance (typing and mousing ability) outcomes among 18 sedentary employees.

Findings

In Phase 1, 96 percent of participants reported they would use the seated active workstation “daily” if provided access in their office. In Phase 2, working while using the seated active workstation increased energy expenditure (p<0.001; d=3.49), heart rate (p<0.001; d=1.26), systolic blood pressure (p=0.02; d=0.79), and muscle activation of the biceps femoris (p<0.001; d=1.36) and vastus lateralis (p<0.001; d=1.88) over the sedentary workstation. No between-group differences were observed for any measures of cognitive function. Mouse point and click time was slower while using the seated active workstation (p=0.02).

Research limitations/implications

These findings suggest this seated active workstation to be acceptable by users and effective for offsetting occupational sedentary time without compromising cognitive function and/or work performance.

Originality/value

The present study is the first to test the potential of this seated active workstation in any capacity.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Birgitte Enslev Jensen, Pauline Anne Found, Sharon J. Williams and Paul Walley

Ward rounds in hospitals are crucial for decision-making in the context of patient treatment processes. However, these tasks are not systematically managed and are often…

Abstract

Purpose

Ward rounds in hospitals are crucial for decision-making in the context of patient treatment processes. However, these tasks are not systematically managed and are often extended due to missing information or equipment or staff unavailability. This research aims to assess whether ward rounds can be structured more efficiently and effectively from the perspective of patients and staff.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-method approach examines the ward rounds conducted in three units within a haematology department of a major Danish hospital. Baseline measures were collected to capture the value of the ward round described by patients and staff. The information on patient and equipment flows associated with a typical ward round was mapped with recommendations for improvement.

Findings

Staff aspired to deliver a good-quality ward round, but what this meant was never articulated and there were no established standards. The duration of the ward round was unpredictable and could take 6 hours to complete. Improvements identified by the team allow the ward rounds to be completed by mid-day with much more certainty.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides an insight as to how ward rounds are conducted within a Danish haematology department.

Practical implications

The research has implications for those involved in ward rounds to reduce the time taken whilst maintaining quality and safety of patient care.

Social implications

This research has implications for patients and their families who wish to spend time with consultants.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on the interactions between doctors and nurses. This research focuses on the operational process of the ward round and presents a structured approach to support multi-disciplinary teams with a focus on value from the patient’s perspective.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2012

John A. Gould and Edward Moe

We examine the rational utility and social–psychological approaches to develop fresh insights into nonviolent civil resistance. Rational utility models provide a useful…

Abstract

We examine the rational utility and social–psychological approaches to develop fresh insights into nonviolent civil resistance. Rational utility models provide a useful, even essential, starting point for understanding what movement organizers must do if they are to overcome their movements’ collective action problems. However, the model's spare definition of agency excludes an investigation of regime legitimacy, how it is constructed and the role it plays in regime continuity. Employing a social psychological approach, we introduce the concept of “ideational assault” in which movement organizers challenge the ideas that justify voluntary civic cooperation with the ruling order. Ideational assault seeks “rhetorical coercion” in which the regime is stripped of credible arguments in its own defense and must increasingly rule by sanctions alone. Ideational assaults employ frames that delegitimize the prevailing order and mobilize people to act against it. By examining several frame forms, including, calls to action, symbolic jiu-jitsu, humor, and moral appeal, we cast new light on the ideational battle that rages alongside the fight for control of the streets. We conclude by arguing that students of nonviolent civil resistance should consult both the rational and social–psychological approaches in their analysis.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Sharon M. Bruns

Accounting educators believe that integrating accounting with other business subjects benefits students by illustrating the connections between disciplines and enhancing…

Abstract

Accounting educators believe that integrating accounting with other business subjects benefits students by illustrating the connections between disciplines and enhancing their abilities to identify which functional skills can be used to solve business problems. There are many models that have been used to achieve integration, including teaching related subject matter in one course, team teaching in cohorts, and designing an entire curriculum around business cases. There are numerous problems in achieving successful integration, primary among them being the costs to faculty in time spent on development and preparation. Another factor hindering successful integration efforts is the scarcity of teaching materials. However, the AACSB and the Pathways Commission continue to emphasize the importance of integrated learning. Recommendations of the Pathways Report to establish a peer-reviewed, electronically stored library of innovative materials open to all accounting educators; and to identify a small number of accounting programs to conduct multiyear pilot programs involving innovation of accounting principles courses may be helpful in assisting more accounting programs to design more integrative programs in the future.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-851-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Anita Mohan and Sharon Sophia

The purpose of this paper is to give prominence and further understand the Coleman and Borman (2000) citizenship performance model. This study also aims to determine and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give prominence and further understand the Coleman and Borman (2000) citizenship performance model. This study also aims to determine and validate the scale formed from the behaviour statements defined by Coleman and Borman in the Indian context by using standard validating measures.

Design/methodology/approach

The citizenship performance construct was measured and validated with a sample of 150 employees working in the IT/ITES sector in Chennai, India. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed on the 27 behavioural statements proposed by Coleman and Borman (2000), which were converted into a five-point Likert scale.

Findings

This paper proposes that citizenship performance can be reliably measured by the 17 items which are based on the 27 citizenship performance behaviour (CPB) statements provided by Coleman and Borman. In addition, it also confirms that citizenship performance is a second-order multi-dimensional construct.

Research limitations/implications

An acceptable but constrained sample was used in this study. The sample frame was limited to the IT/ITES sector in Chennai, a city in Tamil Nadu, India, to minimise cultural influences on the study.

Originality/value

This paper bridges and backs the conceptualisation of the Coleman and Borman (2000) model and the validation of a questionnaire based on their proposed set of CPB statements in the Indian context. This helps to measure the model with its intended questionnaire rather than borrowing items from other scales measuring other dimensions of the OCB domain.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2016

Chris Akroyd, Sharlene Sheetal Narayan Biswas and Sharon Chuang

This paper examines how the management control practices of organization members enable the alignment of product development projects with potentially conflicting…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how the management control practices of organization members enable the alignment of product development projects with potentially conflicting corporate strategies during the product development process.

Methodology/approach

Using an ethnomethodology informed research approach, we carry out a case study of an innovative New Zealand food company. Case study data included an internal company document, interviews with organization members, and an external market analysis document.

Findings

Our case study company had both sales growth and profit growth corporate strategies which have been argued to cause tensions. We found that four management control practices enabled the alignment of product development projects to these strategies. The first management control practice was having the NPD and marketing functions responsible for different corporate strategies. Other management control practices included the involvement of organization members from across multiple functions, the activities they carried out, and the measures used to evaluate project performance during the product development process.

Research limitations/implications

These findings add new insights to the management accounting literature by showing how a combination of management control practices can be used by organization members to align projects with potentially conflicting corporate strategies during the product development process.

Practical implications

While the alignment of product development projects to corporate strategy is not easy this study shows how it can be enabled through a number of management control practices.

Originality/value

We contribute to the management accounting research in this area by extending our understanding of the management control practices used during the product development process.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

James Shearer, Alex D. Wodak and Kate A. Dolan

The study evaluated the introduction of naltrexone in an Australian prison system for imprisoned male heroin users. Treatment outcomes were analysed for two sub‐samples…

Abstract

The study evaluated the introduction of naltrexone in an Australian prison system for imprisoned male heroin users. Treatment outcomes were analysed for two sub‐samples taken from an unsuccessful randomised controlled trial. The first sample comprised 68 participants who were randomly allocated to naltrexone treatment. The second sample comprised 47 participants who commenced opioid pharmacotherapy during the study period. Thirteen per cent of subjects started naltrexone, with only 7% retained in treatment at six months. Six‐month retention was significantly lower in naltrexone compared to methadone (p = 0.0007). Poor patient acceptability and retention did not support oral naltrexone maintenance in this treatment group.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Thomas A. Karel

For the past twenty‐five years or so, the writings of George Orwell — especially his final novel 1984 — have been a popular topic for student research. From junior high…

Abstract

For the past twenty‐five years or so, the writings of George Orwell — especially his final novel 1984 — have been a popular topic for student research. From junior high through graduate school, interest in Orwell has been consistent. Book reports, term papers, and even seminars on Orwell are common‐place in the national curriculum. Now, as the year 1984 arrives, librarians at all levels — public, school, academic — must brace themselves for a year‐long onslaught of requests for biographical and critical material on Orwell.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Ann Elizabeth Esain, Sharon J. Williams, Sandeep Gakhal, Lynne Caley and Matthew W. Cooke

This article aims to explore quality improvement (QI) at individual, group and organisational level. It also aims to identify restraining forces using formative evaluation…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore quality improvement (QI) at individual, group and organisational level. It also aims to identify restraining forces using formative evaluation and discuss implications for current UK policy, particularly quality, innovation, productivity and prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

Learning events combined with work‐based projects, focusing on individual and group responses are evaluated. A total of 11 multi‐disciplinary groups drawn from NHS England healthcare Trusts (self‐governing operational groups) were sampled. These Trusts have different geographic locations and participants were drawn from primary, secondary and commissioning arms. Mixed methods: questionnaires, observations and reflective accounts were used.

Findings

The paper finds that solution versus problem identification causes confusion and influences success. Time for problem solving to achieve QI was absent. Feedback and learning structures are often not in place or inflexible. Limited focus on patient‐centred services may be related to past assumptions regarding organisational design, hence assumptions and models need to be understood and challenged.

Practical implications

The authors revise the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) model by adding an explicit problem identification step and hence avoiding solution‐focused habits; demonstrating the need for more formative evaluations to inform managers and policy makers about healthcare QI processes.

Originality/value

Although UK‐centric, the quality agenda is a USA and European theme, findings may help those embarking on this journey or those struggling with QI.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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