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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Andrew Lindridge, Sharon E. Beatty and William Magnus Northington

Gambling is increasingly a global phenomenon, derided by some as exploitative and viewed by others as entertainment. Despite extensive research into gambling motivations…

Abstract

Purpose

Gambling is increasingly a global phenomenon, derided by some as exploitative and viewed by others as entertainment. Despite extensive research into gambling motivations, previous research has not assessed whether gaming choice is a function of one’s personal motivations or simply a desire to gamble in general, regardless of game choice among recreational gamblers. The purpose of this study is to explore this theme by considering “illusion of control” where luck and skill may moderate gambling motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies two motivation theories, hedonic consumption theory and motivation disposition theory, and examines heuristic perspectives related to gambling. Three stages of qualitative data collection were undertaken.

Findings

The findings indicate that for recreational gamblers, gaming choice is a function of personal motives. Hence, gamblers chose games that reflect their needs or motives, focusing on the game or games that best allow them to achieve their goals and desires.

Research limitations/implications

These findings shed light on an important topic and include an in-depth examination of recreational gamblers’ motivations. Further quantitative examinations should be considered.

Practical implications

This research could be used by practitioners or researchers in better segmenting the casino recreational gambling market.

Originality/value

While many researchers have examined gambling motivations and even gambling motivations by venue (e.g. casino versus online), few researchers have focused on gamblers’ choice of games and even fewer have studied recreational gamblers’ motivations with a qualitatively rich approach, resulting in some useful perspectives on drivers of recreational gamblers by personal motives.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

William W. Hill, Sharon E. Beatty and Gianfranco Walsh

– The purpose of this study is to identify key motivations for adolescents using and shopping on the internet, and to segment the sample based on these motivations.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify key motivations for adolescents using and shopping on the internet, and to segment the sample based on these motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

This research occurs in two phases: a qualitative phase involving interviews with adolescents aged 12-15 and parents of adolescents in this age group; then, a quantitative phase using a survey (n=360) to measure the motivations and other key profiling variables identified in the qualitative phase and the literature review.

Findings

The research identifies five basic motivations and two shopping motivations influencing adolescent online usage and shopping. Next, a cluster analysis is conducted using the motivations developed and is used to identify segments of adolescent internet users and shoppers, which are subsequently described.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of adolescents was taken from a town in the southeast USA. Caution should be taken when generalizing to adolescents outside this region.

Practical implications

This research identifies for internet marketers the different types of adolescent internet users and shoppers. It also recognizes key motivations that marketers should consider when targeting adolescents.

Originality/value

This research is the first to identify important segments of adolescents based on their motivations for online usage and shopping, and builds on a limited stream of research relative to adolescents and internet shopping.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Christina K.C. Lee and Sharon E. Beatty

Reports on a study which examines the effect of family structure in the family decision‐making process. In particular, it seeks to determine if sex‐role orientation and…

14589

Abstract

Reports on a study which examines the effect of family structure in the family decision‐making process. In particular, it seeks to determine if sex‐role orientation and the wives’ occupational status make a difference in the amount of influence adolescents and their parents have in family purchase decisions. This study uses an observational approach to measure the amount of influence displayed by all members of the family in the purchase decision. Observational data is derived from videotaped recordings of family interactions during a simulated decision‐making situation. The results reported here support the comparative resource contribution theory; mothers who contribute to the provision of their families have significant influence. Further, the amount of influence exerted by adolescents is found to be dependent on their families’ sex‐role orientation and their mothers’ occupational status.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Gianfranco Walsh, Sharon E Beatty and Betsy Bugg Holloway

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a client-based reputation of business-to-business professional services firms scale (PSF-Rep) which measures clients…

1783

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a client-based reputation of business-to-business professional services firms scale (PSF-Rep) which measures clients’ perceptions of the reputation of professional service provider firms. So far, no multidimensional scale exists in the literature to measure the reputation of professional service firms, although the reputation dimensions of importance are likely to be very different from other settings.

Design/methodology/approach

From an initial pool of fieldwork-based items, an 18-item PSF-Rep scale is developed, which is validated using several samples – corporate financial decision-makers’ views of their accounting firms in a US national sample and organizational clients of one large legal firm with national presence.

Findings

The four-dimensional PSF-Rep scale meets all established reliability and validity criteria. Further, reputation and its dimensions (using PSF-Rep) are positively associated with important marketing outcomes, including word of mouth, loyalty intentions, trust and share of wallet.

Originality/value

As professional service markets become more competitive, firms recognize the importance of a good reputation in attracting customers. This research is the first to propose a psychometrically robust measure to capture client-based reputation of business-to-business professional services firms.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Lynn R. Kahle and Patricia Kennedy

Research on social values has been shown to be beneficial in market segmentation. This article describes the List of Values (LOV), a methodology that may allow comparison…

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Abstract

Research on social values has been shown to be beneficial in market segmentation. This article describes the List of Values (LOV), a methodology that may allow comparison and contrast of values. Details of the methodology and recent research using it are described, and data analysis strategies are discussed.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Stephanie Gillison, Alexa Martinez Givan, Sharon E Beatty, Kyoungmi (Kate) Kim, Kristy Reynolds and Julie Baker

This paper aims to explore the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip to better understand the experiences and process that occur during these shopping trips. Adolescent…

2748

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip to better understand the experiences and process that occur during these shopping trips. Adolescent girls and their mothers are an important shopping companion pair that has received minimal study.

Design/methodology/approach

This research investigates the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip using in-depth interviews with 28 mothers, adolescent daughters and retail employees in the USA.

Findings

The interviews reveal that the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip consists of three important developmental experiences: conflict and struggle, education and influence and bonding between mother and daughter. Similarities and differences between middle- and high-school daughters relative to these issues are explored.

Originality/value

This study is the first to bring together the interplay processes of conflict, education and influence and bonding during mother–adolescent daughter shopping trips. This study extends research regarding family identity interplay, companion shopping, adolescent identity development and consumer socialization. The authors find that the mother–adolescent daughter shopping trip involves daughters’ efforts to separate from their mothers and form their own identities, often producing struggle and conflicts; daughters developing as consumers and individuals; and an opportunity to bond.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Betsy Bugg Holloway, Sijun Wang and Sharon E. Beatty

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether high quality relationships buffer or magnify the negative impact of a failed service recovery on subsequent consumer…

5039

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether high quality relationships buffer or magnify the negative impact of a failed service recovery on subsequent consumer attitudes and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 264 online shoppers were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. Respondents were asked to imagine themselves in a hypothetical failed service recovery scenario involving a multi‐channel retailer with whom they shop.

Findings

Results from a MANCOVA analysis and SEM modeling indicate that, following a failed service recovery incident, high quality relationships present a challenge for the service provider. In accordance with the hypotheses, consumers with a high level of relationship quality will decrease their repurchase intentions to a greater extent; more strongly and negatively adjust their overall relationship quality; and react to the service recovery effort less favorably than those with lower levels of relationship quality.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that high quality relationships may “raise the bar” of service recovery management, rather than “buffering” firms from service failure.

Practical implications

Service providers should consider the potential implications of customer relationship quality in their service recovery management efforts.

Originality/value

The study provides empirical evidence of the “double‐edge” issue of relationship quality in service recovery management, illustrating the need to incorporate this variable in future service failure/recovery research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Philip J. Trocchia and Sharon E. Beatty

This research study explores the growing phenomenon of consumption without ownership by addressing individuals’ motivations for leasing, rather than financing, products…

4154

Abstract

This research study explores the growing phenomenon of consumption without ownership by addressing individuals’ motivations for leasing, rather than financing, products. A two‐phase study was conducted in the retail automotive industry in order to ascertain motives for consumer leasing. It was found that while all hypothesized motives were predictors of the lease/finance decision (including desire for gratification and desire for social approval), two variables – desire for variety and desire for simplified maintenance – emerged as the best predictors of whether an individual chooses to lease or finance his/her motor vehicle. Implications for marketers and academicians are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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