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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2016

Adelina Broadbridge and Sharon Anne Mavin

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Sharon Anne Mavin, Carole Elliott, Valerie Stead and Jannine Williams

The purpose of this special issue is to extend the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC)-funded UK seminar series–Challenging Gendered Media…

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2022

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this special issue is to extend the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC)-funded UK seminar series–Challenging Gendered Media (Mis)Representations of Women Professionals and Leaders; and to highlight research into the gendered media constructions of women managers and leaders and outline effective methods and methodologies into diverse media.

Design/methodology/approach

Gendered analysis of television, autobiographies (of Sheryl Sandberg, Karren Brady, Hillary Clinton and Julia Gillard), broadcast news media and media press through critical discourse analysis, thematic analysis, metaphor and computer-aided text analysis software following the format of the Gender Media Monitoring Project (2015) and [critical] ecological framework for advancing social change.

Findings

The papers surface the gendered nature of media constructions of women managers and leaders and offer methods and methodologies for others to follow to interrogate gendered media. Further, the papers discuss – how women’s leadership is glamourized, fetishized and sexualized; the embodiment of leadership for women; how popular culture can subvert the dominant gaze; how women use agency and how powerful gendered norms shape perceptions, discourses and norms and how these are resisted, repudiated and represented.

Practical implications

The papers focus upon how the media constructs women managers and leaders and offer implications of how media influences and is influenced by practice. There are recommendations provided as to how the media could itself be organized differently to reflect diverse audiences, and what can be done to challenge gendered media.

Social implications

Challenging gendered media representations of women managers and leaders is critical to social justice and equality for women in management and leadership.

Originality/value

This is an invited Special Issue comprising inaugural collection of research through which we get to “see” women and leaders and the gendered media gaze and to learn from research into popular culture through analysis of television, autobiographies and media press.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

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0

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Gina Grandy, Patricia Lewis and Sharon Mavin

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320

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Sharon Mavin

Using an alternative lens to challenge assumptions of solidarity behaviour and the queen bee label, the paper aims to analyse empirical data to explore negative relations…

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2123

Abstract

Purpose

Using an alternative lens to challenge assumptions of solidarity behaviour and the queen bee label, the paper aims to analyse empirical data to explore negative relations between women in management and surface processes of female misogyny.

Design/methodology/approach

Feminist standpoint epistemology; qualitative semi‐structured interviews; subjective narrative data from senior women and women academics of management in two UK organisations.

Findings

Assumptions of solidarity behaviour are largely absent in the research and the queen bee label impacts pejoratively on women in management, perpetuating a “blame the woman” perspective. Senior women do recognise barriers facing women in management but they do not want to lead on the “women in management mantle.” This does not make them queen bees; the women recognise becoming “male” in order to “fit” senior management and acknowledge the impact of their gendered context. From this context, processes of female misogyny between women in management fragment notions of solidarity; highlight contradictory places women take in relation to other women and challenge women as “natural allies.”

Research limitations/implications

Future research should engage women at all levels in management in consciousness‐raising to the impact women have on other women. Organizational interventions are required to explicitly surface how the gender order exacerbates differences between them to maintain the gendered status quo.

Originality/value

Empirical paper using an alternative lens to problematize solidarity behaviour and queen bee, surfaces female misogyny between women in management and highlights how the gendered social order encourages and exacerbate differences between women.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Liz Matykiewicz and Robert McMurray

The purpose of this paper is to consider the ways in which certain occupational, organizational and political positions become active sites of leadership construction…

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1119

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the ways in which certain occupational, organizational and political positions become active sites of leadership construction. Taking as their example the introduction of the Modern Matron in the English National Health Service (NHS) this paper considers how new forms of gender transcending leadership are constituted relationally through a dynamic interplay of historical, nostalgic, social, political and organizational forces.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted within an interpretive paradigm of social constructivism and draws on data from semi‐structured interviews with a purposive sample of 16 Modern Matrons working in a single English NHS Trust. In keeping with inductive, qualitative research practice, data has been analysed thematically and ordered using descriptive, hierarchical and relational coding.

Findings

Their contention is that the Modern Matron presents as a site for relational leadership in respect of both self and other. This paper argues that the construction of Modern Matron usefully points to the ways in which multiple discourses, practices and relations may be intertwined in defining what it is to lead in contemporary organizations. This paper highlights the extent to which leadership is an on‐going relational co‐construction based – in this instance – in the interplay of four factors: nostalgic authority, visibility, praxis and order negotiation. Together, these produce a mode of leading that is neither heroic nor popularist.

Research limitations/implications

Further research might consider how competing temporal, political and organizational imperatives encourage the development of particular sites for leadership, and how such leadership is then re‐performed in practice, as well as the affects/effect on individual and organisational performance.

Originality/value

The data provides opportunity to consider the “lived experience” of leaders in sites that are traditionally gendered female in non‐standard/public sector settings. Moreover, this paper presents empirical evidence in support of leadership as socially constructed and relational, borne of tension between different temporal, spatial and experiential factors, the on‐going negotiation of which both utilises and transcends masculinized and feminized gender performances. The result is a form of “leading” which is often subtle, difficult to identify and self‐effacing.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Sandra Fielden

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382

Abstract

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Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Sandra L. Fielden

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404

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Adelina Broadbridge

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2034

Abstract

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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