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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Sharmistha Self and Subhasree Basuroy

The primary objective of this paper is to identify and analyze factors that influence choice and quality of healthcare of the elderly population in two northern and two…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this paper is to identify and analyze factors that influence choice and quality of healthcare of the elderly population in two northern and two southern states in India. The purpose of this paper is to look beyond the obvious factors that influence choice and therefore the quality of healthcare and seek to find whether there are some additional indirect factors that also influence choice and quality of healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilizes data from the Longitudinal Aging Study in India pilot project, which was a cross-sectional survey of men and women aged 45 and over focusing on two northern states (Punjab and Rajasthan) and two southern states (Kerala and Karnataka). In this paper the authors carry out a Probit analysis to estimate the factors that influence the elderly’s choice of healthcare.

Findings

The authors find that social activity via different types of social interactions outside the home and access to a phone (which is one of the cheapest and most commonly used methods of communication used by people in India) are statistically significant in influencing better quality of healthcare for the elderly. Moreover, gender-segregated results suggest that social activity is particularly important for elderly females. Relative price of healthcare is also an important determinant of the quality of healthcare sought. The authors also find some consistent regional influences on healthcare choices by the elderly.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the data itself which is cross-sectional in nature. However, as further rounds of survey are conducted the authors hope to be able to build on the results of this paper using a longitudinal approach. A second limitation is the lack of variables available for carrying out an instrumental variables analysis. The results imply that elderly males and females are influenced by different things when it comes to healthcare choices. Thus for policy to be effective, the government needs to pursue avenues that would be most likely to succeed.

Practical implications

One of the most important practical implications of this research is the understanding that informal channels of knowledge transmission are important especially for the elderly in India. Traditional methods of knowledge transmission such as education, media, and income are less likely to be effective in a country where majority of the people are illiterate and poor. Social interactions appear to be most effective in influencing healthcare choices of elderly females.

Social implications

The most obvious social implications of this paper are the importance of social interactions via social activities outside the home and ability for social communication via access to a phone for the elderly population in India to make better healthcare choices and therefore receive better healthcare.

Originality/value

The literature on elderly healthcare is limited when it comes to developing countries. What makes matters worse for India is that up until recently there have been no comprehensive efforts to collect reliable data on the elderly population in India. As a result there is extremely limited availability of policy-relevant research dedicated to issues relating to the older population. Most of the existing literature looks at self-reported health and healthcare status or utilization. This paper would be among the first to address factors influencing quality of healthcare received by the elderly population in India.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Sharmistha Self

The purpose of this paper is to take a close look at factors that influence the choice and quality of healthcare received by ailing and elderly people in rural north…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to take a close look at factors that influence the choice and quality of healthcare received by ailing and elderly people in rural north India. The author is primarily interested in seeing what role is played by the presence of sons in the family, particularly co-residence with sons. In the absence of some broad-based social security arrangement in countries like India, older adults traditionally turn to living arrangement where the older adults are supported by their children or extended family. In a patriarchal society as India, such responsibility lies with the sons if one has son/s. Such dependence on sons explains preferential treatment towards younger sons as a justification for the care parents receive from sons in their advanced years. This culture of son preference behavior provides the context for this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical model is based on testing three inter-related research questions. First, the author asks whether having grown sons or living with son/s leads to up-front better quality of healthcare for parents. If the empirical analysis does not show support for this research question, the author broadens the research question to ask whether those with grown son/s or those that live with their son/s have a higher probability of seeing a trained medical professional as compared to some traditional healer. If the empirical analysis does not support the second question, the author further broadens the research question and asks whether those elderly who are sick are more likely to receive any healthcare (medical or traditional) if they have grown son/s or live with their son/s.

Findings

The results show that co-residence with a son does not have a statistically significant impact on the quality of healthcare received by the elderly individual. Additionally, not having a son also does not have a statistically significant impact on quality of healthcare received.

Research limitations/implications

For the purpose of the empirical analysis, the author utilizes World Bank's Living Standard Measurement Survey (LSMS) data collected from rural villages in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in India in 1997-1998. The dataset may be somewhat dated, but it provides relevant information which transcends time. Additionally, with economic growth and modernization, more and more young people in India have migrated away from rural areas in the recent decade. Thus, surveys carried out in the last decade by the National Family Health Surveys in India show very little evidence of elderly parent in rural areas living with their adult children. This practice seemed to be much more prevalent at the time of the LSMS survey of 1997-1998.

Practical implications

Contrary to popular expectation, the results show that co-residing with a son has no statistically significant impact on healthcare received by parents. Additionally, not having sons does not matter either.

Originality/value

The author finds relatively fewer studies done on factors that determine the choice of healthcare for the elderly, particularly relating to those that are ailing (for reasons other than simply aging) and with reference to their living arrangement. The present paper addresses this void in the literature and is expected to make a meaningful contribution in bridging this gap in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Sharmistha Self

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of agricultural technology on fertility rates in developing countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of agricultural technology on fertility rates in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

It is hypothesized here that agricultural technology transforms production techniques and labor demand patterns which affect fertility rates. The hypothesis is tested empirically using ordinary least squares as well as instrumental variables estimation techniques.

Findings

The results show that agricultural technology has a direct and indirect negative impact on fertility. Once technology is divided into mechanical and biochemical technology, one finds stronger evidence of mechanical technology being the driving force behind reducing fertility.

Research limitations/implications

This paper's main limitation is that it does not take regional, sub‐regional and intra‐country variations into account. Future research should focus on these areas.

Practical implications

The policy implication of these results would be for governments of developing countries to concentrate on modernizing the existing agricultural sector while absorbing more women in the formal labor force.

Originality/value

This paper adds meaningfully to research in an area that has received limited attention thus far. The results of this paper will be of value to researchers in economic development and policy makers in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Sharmistha Self and Richard Grabowski

The purpose of this paper is to seek to empirically analyze whether the impact of Islam on relative gender performance varies by regions of the non‐Arabic world's economy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to empirically analyze whether the impact of Islam on relative gender performance varies by regions of the non‐Arabic world's economy. In addition, if in some regions Islam is found to have a negative impact on relative gender performance, an attempt is made to determine what aspect of Islamic practice (not doctrine) might account for this impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical estimations are carried out in a cross‐country framework.

Findings

The results indicate that the impact of Islam varies by region, for the most part being associated with a worsening in relative gender performance. However, once it accounts for differences in birth rates, the negative impact of Islam on gender inequality disappears for all regions.

Research limitations/implications

Fewer variations in the data limit the estimation procedures one can use for the purpose of the analysis.

Practical implications

Contrary to the consensus in the literature, the paper finds that it is not Islam that worsens gender inequality but rather the high fertility rates generally found among followers of Islam.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in its focusing exclusively on non‐Arab countries.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Richard Grabowski

Economists have recently emphasized the role which institutional change plays in the process of economic growth and development. Focusing on the behavior of the state…

Abstract

Economists have recently emphasized the role which institutional change plays in the process of economic growth and development. Focusing on the behavior of the state, effective constraints on the ruling elite are seen as a necessary precursor to successful economic growth. However, it is argued in this paper that causality runs the other way. Rapid growth (even with dictatorial regimes) leads to political development and institutional structures which provide a foundation for successful long‐term growth. It will be further argued that the greatest potential for stimulating political development comes as the result of rapid agricultural growth. The institutional constraints arising out of political development create an environment within which the ruling elite become developmental rather than predatory. The cases of English and Japanese industrialization will be used to illustrate these ideas. The relevance of the analyses for today's developing countries is discussed and illustrated with reference to the African experience.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Sharmistha Sharma and Jeevan Bhatta

The purpose of this paper is to depict the current scenario of coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) in Nepal, how the government is tackling this pandemic as well as look…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to depict the current scenario of coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) in Nepal, how the government is tackling this pandemic as well as look at the public health challenges that Nepal is facing and might face in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a viewpoint of COVID-19 activities conducted in Nepal.

Findings

Nepal is vulnerable to COVID-19, as it shares borders with China and India. Cases have started to be seen in different parts of Nepal. Government of Nepal has started various measures to control the spread of the virus such as deploying health workers, information sharing via different mediums. However, there are still many challenges that the government and public health officials need to be concerned about as well.

Originality/value

This paper provides information about the situation of COVID-19 in Nepal, how the government is handling, and public health challenges that may arise. This paper can be beneficial for further public health interventions.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Parthiban S. Gopal and Gayathri Sathyanarayanan

The purpose of this paper is to scrutinize the severe impact on the abilities of urban poor women such as education skills, entrepreneurship qualities, employment skills…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to scrutinize the severe impact on the abilities of urban poor women such as education skills, entrepreneurship qualities, employment skills, creative abilities and social skills, as they face many challenges like inequitable access to work and unacceptable living conditions influenced by an underlying mind-set in the society driven by gender socialization. Though there have been changes in the way we perceive the abilities of urban poor women from being a homemaker to participating in employment and access to education, one cannot deny that discrimination and bias based on gender socialization still exists in the society.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses secondary data through a systematic review where the inclusion criteria were framed on the basis of relevance, credibility and heterogeneity. However, as this is a concept paper, the study is bereft of empirical data.

Findings

In most cases, the ability and potential of women, such as educational skills, entrepreneurship qualities, employment skills, creative abilities and social skills, go unnoticed or, more often, not taken into consideration. Predominantly influenced by gender roles, not all abilities and skills are associated with women; this kind of labelling process refers to gender socialization. Ongoing in society for a long time to an extent, it has been accepted consciously or subconsciously by men and women. As a result, urban poor women, in particular, are further deprived of their capabilities, directly affecting their personal growth and economic status.

Originality/value

Poverty affects men, women, boys and girls, but it is experienced differently by people of different ages, ethnicities, family roles and sex. Moreover, due to women’s biology, social and cultural gender roles and culturally constructed subordination, they are labelled with specific roles dictated by various social agents; This labelling process refers to gender socialization. As a result, capable women with untapped skills, abilities and potential to learn, work, earn, play and develop are ignored or suppressed; hence, they go unnoticed, further intensifying poverty among poor urban women.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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