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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Sharifah Alwi, Norbani Che-Ha, Bang Nguyen, Ezlika M. Ghazali, Dilip M. Mutum and Philip J. Kitchen

This study attempts to ascertain the essential dimensions and components of university brand image, including the cognitive attributes (service/educational quality) and affective…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to ascertain the essential dimensions and components of university brand image, including the cognitive attributes (service/educational quality) and affective attributes (corporate brand image) of the university.

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops, explores and presents a student-consumer behavioral response model based on students’ experiences at university, exploring the relationship between these attributes with satisfaction and behavioral response [word-of-mouth (WOM)].

Findings

Findings reveal that both branding aspects – brand experience and corporate brand image – follow a rational thought process first before an affective component is then taken into account, resulting in brand promise and loyalty. The study identifies several important cognitive brand image attributes and experiences that guide brand positioning for the Malaysian market, linking these to satisfaction and WOM.

Research limitations/implications

It was conducted in a single case-university and future research could replicate this in other schools/institutions. Cross-validation to other private institutions lies outside the scope of this study. Furthermore, although the study has identified specific attributes of university brands, they tend to be seen or interpreted as overall for both brand experiences and corporate brand image attributes because of the reflective nature of the construct, and also they tend to be seen as higher order rather than at individual levels. Further research is needed to analyze these dimensions using a quantitative approach at individual levels and testing the conceptual model as presented in the conceptual model. The study is focused on one Asian market (Malaysian students in X University) chosen for its potential growth in the future.

Practical implications

The present study contributes to the identification of specific students’ needs and attributes including courses and modules, reputable schools, the environment (e.g. campus – near to lecturer, international), helpful lecturers and the university location. Addressing the right brand attributes enhance and clarify the positioning aspect of the university brand, while simultaneously addressing the needs and wants of consumers. For example, by understanding the culture – consumer buying behavior within this setting, marketers or school administrators can identify exactly, which behaviors could be changed and by which mechanism i.e. talking to sponsors, and introducing activities to increase visibility/image in Malaysia. Interacting with sponsors can influence them toward sending students to X instead of to other universities in the UK.

Originality/value

The study contributes to theoretical knowledge in at least two different ways: by identifying possible corporate brand image attributes and experience that guide brand positioning (for the Malaysian market), and by exploring the relationship between these attributes and satisfaction and behavioral response (WOM) as proposed in the study’s conceptual framework. The study has identified the specific attributes that influence Malaysian students’ early interest in selecting X University via, for example, a recommendation from existing students at X, their sponsors, employers, the courses or modules X offers and location – in London. The study further revealed that corporate brand image attributes of business schools (cognitively and effectively) enhance corporate brand differentiation and positioning (Rauschnabel et al., 2016).

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Ahmed Suhail Ajina, Arnold Japutra, Bang Nguyen, Sharifah Faridah Syed Alwi and Ali H. Al-Hajla

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the perception of CSR influences different aspects of consumer behaviour, specifically focussing on the antecedents of perceived value…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the perception of CSR influences different aspects of consumer behaviour, specifically focussing on the antecedents of perceived value, customer support and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 418 completed responses were obtained and provided the data to analyse and test the hypothesised research model. To test the hypotheses, structural equation modelling using PLS was employed.

Findings

Findings reveal that customer awareness of the current CSR initiatives to different stakeholder groups significantly influences their perceptions of what social initiatives are actually undertaken by firms for their economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibility. In addition, customer views of what firms actually do in respect to social initiatives are significantly related to their level of CSR expectations. This indicates that the customers will always expect more from banks compared to what they actually do. Surprisingly, CSR perception is not directly related to customers’ loyalty, which contradicts the majority of previous studies indicating that CSR perception influences consumer behaviour.

Originality/value

This study provides an original contribution to the CSR body of knowledge, especially for developing countries where the awareness level is low. It also provides a deep understanding of the influence of CSR into consumer behaviour, as it investigates the influence of the full construct of CSR into customer loyalty. Finally, the study investigated the relationship between the perception and the expectation of CSR; this relationship has been neglected in previous studies, where either CSR perceptions or CSR expectations have been examined separately.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Khian Sin Ong, Bang Nguyen and Sharifah Faridah Syed Alwi

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a consumer-based virtual brand personality (CBVBP) concept by examining its sub-dimensions in the context of online banking, thus…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a consumer-based virtual brand personality (CBVBP) concept by examining its sub-dimensions in the context of online banking, thus extending existing brand personality research. In addition, it examines the relationship between CBVBP with customer satisfaction and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was employed and data were collected from 219 online banking users in Malaysia. A series of hypotheses were tested using both multiple and hierarchical regression analyses to determine the direct and mediating effects of CBVBP, customer satisfaction and brand loyalty.

Findings

The dimensions that comprise CBVBP are found to include Excitement, Sophistication and Competence. These dimensions help online bankers to strategise, communicate and position their online banking sites better in order to compete against other online banking services. The study confirmed positive relationships between CBVBP, customer satisfaction and brand loyalty. Specifically, in the online banking context, customer satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between CBVBP and brand loyalty, extending the current understanding of online branding, consumer satisfaction and brand loyalty.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this study lies in the development of the CBVBP concept and to study its direct and mediating effects with customer satisfaction and brand loyalty. The study emphasises the importance of measuring the virtual brand personality traits as part of an overall online banking brand strategy in the virtual environment in order to better understand how to position against competitors.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Sharifah Faridah Syed Alwi, John M.T. Balmer, Maria-Cristina Stoian and Philip J. Kitchen

This study aims to investigate how marketing communication (MC) and nascent corporate communication (CC) strategies are juxtaposed in the small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how marketing communication (MC) and nascent corporate communication (CC) strategies are juxtaposed in the small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research method based on a multiple case study approach is elaborated in a South-East Asian emerging economy.

Findings

The key findings show that MC and nascent CC strategies coexist in SMEs, and are frequently closely interwoven, enabling the introduction of an integrated hybrid communication (IHC) theoretical perspective in this context. Four requisites inform IHC management: communicate the identity/roots; establish and communicate the relationship with multiple stakeholders; communicate the product/service to customers; and communicate other activities of the firm (e.g. corporate social responsibility and brand identity). SME managers were predisposed to use at least three communication channels among the following: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing and/or personal selling. Furthermore, managers generally preferred internet-enabled communication.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides fresh insights into how SMEs could integrate their communication strategies to increase their survival chances and business growth. However, the need to develop SMEs is required in every economy. Thus, the present findings could be seen as relevant to various audiences (academic, practitioners and/or policy-makers) such as for managers from Western and/or European settings who are interested in operating in the Malaysian economy.

Practical implications

By using the four requisites that inform IHC, owners/managers of SMEs can adopt a more holistic approach, by strategically planning communication activities using both communication typologies (i.e. product and firm level). Thus, SMEs will be able to enhance clarity and consistency in their communication strategy and achieve brand equity across relevant stakeholders in the long run.

Originality/value

This study introduces the IHC theoretical perspective and reveals the communication tools used by SMEs to communicate product and brand-related messages to multiple stakeholders. These messages tend to stem from and are shaped by the identity/roots of the firm embedded in managerial personality/values.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Syed Sardar Muhammad, Bidit Lal Dey, Sharifah Faridah Syed Alwi, Muhammad Mustafa Kamal and Yousra Asaad

Despite consumers' widespread use of social media platforms, there is scant research on the underlying factors that influence their willingness to share digital footprints on…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite consumers' widespread use of social media platforms, there is scant research on the underlying factors that influence their willingness to share digital footprints on social media. The purpose of this study is to address this research gap by examining consumers' cognitive and affective attitudes simultaneously.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used quantitative method by using online survey administered to a sample of 733 social media users.

Findings

The findings indicate both cognitive and affective attitudes jointly influence consumers' behavioural intentions with trust as a key construct mediating the relationship between attitudinal antecedents and consumers' willingness to share digital footprints on social media.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the information systems (IS) literature by offering a comprehensive framework constituting the joint attitudinal components as antecedents to consumers' behavioural intention for sharing digital footprints while trust works as a mediator.

Practical implications

This paper has important managerial implications. It helps marketers and IS managers in profiling consumers, understanding consumption patterns, sharing of digital footprints, which are useful for effective market segmentation, product development and future design of social media platforms. It informs social media providers of the importance of not only focussing on functional aspects but also underscores the essence of paying attention to consumers' affect towards social media platforms, especially trust.

Originality/value

The paper presents an original framework that explains the influence of joint attitudinal components on behavioural intention, with trust as a mediator.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Norfaridah Ali Azizan, Amirul Afif Muhamat, Sharifah Faigah Syed Alwi, Husniyati Ali and Amalia Qistina Casteneda Abdullah

Waqf (endowment) lands constitute as among the highest types of waqf (endowment) properties in Malaysia; yet it is still unable to reach its maximum potential due to various…

Abstract

Purpose

Waqf (endowment) lands constitute as among the highest types of waqf (endowment) properties in Malaysia; yet it is still unable to reach its maximum potential due to various challenges such as capital, location, legal and administrative issues. Therefore, this study intends to explore these issues by focussing on the two states in Malaysia (Selangor and Perak) that have fertile lands but different management authorities.

Design/methodology/approach

There were series of interviews that had been conducted with ten (10) key informants who are experts and practitioners in the areas of Shariah (Islamic law), farming, agribusiness, land management and waqf.

Findings

Findings exhibit that constraints and challenges that had been highlighted in the previous literature still exist (although some improvements had been made), but there is emerging theme that the study intends to highlight which is on the needs to secure market for the agribusiness produce and the potential role of anchor company in the agribusiness. It is pertinent that for agribusiness to thrive, selecting the right anchor company that has the capacity to address the challenges is necessary. This study posits two anchor company models (Waqf Trustee-Anchor Company and Waqf Trustee-Anchor Company-Community Farmers) that can be applied for agribusiness on the waqf lands.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on the Malaysia's context influenced by specific country's features. Nevertheless, such findings can still be used as reference or benchmark by other endowment trustees in other countries especially for the Muslim countries as well as the non-Muslim countries that have significant Muslim populations.

Social implications

The suggested models have potentials to improve the living condition of the B40 (below 40% household income) in Malaysia because the models encourage their participation in the agribusiness activities.

Originality/value

This study focusses on the agribusiness, which is rarely being given attention in previous literature in the context of endowment lands. Therefore, this article bridges the literature gap and at the same time attempts to provide suggestion to address the pertinent issue – the underutilised endowment lands.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Bidit Lal Dey, Sharifah Alwi, Fred Yamoah, Stephanie Agyepongmaa Agyepong, Hatice Kizgin and Meera Sarma

While it is essential to further research the growing diversity in western metropolitan cities, little is currently known about how the members of various ethnic communities…

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Abstract

Purpose

While it is essential to further research the growing diversity in western metropolitan cities, little is currently known about how the members of various ethnic communities acculturate to multicultural societies. The purpose of this paper is to explore immigrants’ cosmopolitanism and acculturation strategies through an analysis of the food consumption behaviour of ethnic consumers in multicultural London.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was set within the socio-cultural context of London. A number of qualitative methods such as in-depth interviews, observation and photographs were used to assess consumers’ acculturation strategies in a multicultural environment and how that is influenced by consumer cosmopolitanism.

Findings

Ethnic consumers’ food consumption behaviour reflects their acculturation strategies, which can be classified into four groups: rebellion, rarefaction, resonance and refrainment. This classification demonstrates ethnic consumers’ multi-directional acculturation strategies, which are also determined by their level of cosmopolitanism.

Research limitations/implications

The taxonomy presented in this paper advances current acculturation scholarship by suggesting a multi-directional model for acculturation strategies as opposed to the existing uni-directional and bi-directional perspectives and explicates the role of consumer cosmopolitanism in consumer acculturation. The paper did not engage host communities and there is hence a need for future research on how and to what extent host communities are acculturated to the multicultural environment.

Practical implications

The findings have direct implications for the choice of standardisation vs adaptation as a marketing strategy within multicultural cities. Whilst the rebellion group are more likely to respond to standardisation, increasing adaptation of goods and service can ideally target members of the resistance and resonance groups and more fusion products should be exclusively earmarked for the resonance group.

Originality/value

The paper makes original contribution by introducing a multi-directional perspective to acculturation by delineating four-group taxonomy (rebellion, rarefaction, resonance and refrainment). This paper also presents a dynamic model that captures how consumer cosmopolitanism impinges upon the process and outcome of multi-directional acculturation strategies.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Sharifah Faridah Syed Alwi and T.C. Melewar

The purpose of this paper is to present a compendium of small research studies that have been conducted in Malaysia. Issues of branding and its related constructs have gained…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a compendium of small research studies that have been conducted in Malaysia. Issues of branding and its related constructs have gained widespread recognition amongst practitioners and academics in this country.

Design/methodology/approach

Inter alia, this paper examines six facets of branding across different industries and contexts. The first study examines issues of branding in the Islamic financial services. The second paper investigates airline brand reputation. The third paper explores employer branding in the context of hotels. The fourth study explicates online brand personality in the banking sector. The fifth project evaluates the aspect of brand loyalty in the telecommunication industry and the final paper unfolds the industrial brand loyalty and ethical brand.

Findings

The paper highlights six findings across six different industries in Malaysia.

Originality/value

The paper gives a Malaysian perspective on branding in Asia.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2023

Siti Mazlita Yamaludin, Sharifah Faigah Syed Alwi, Romzie Rosman and Mohd Rahim Khamis

This study aims to explore the COVID-19 impact on the sustainability of gharimin (genuine debtors) in Islamic financial institutions (IFI) in Malaysia. The analysis was further…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the COVID-19 impact on the sustainability of gharimin (genuine debtors) in Islamic financial institutions (IFI) in Malaysia. The analysis was further conducted to expand the interpretation of gharimin in zakat institutions (ZI) to use the role of zakat distribution during the post-pandemic period due to income shock and long-term unemployment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative research approach with grounded theory analysis to integrate theoretical insights into the interpretation of gharimin and current practices from the perspectives of ZI and IFI. An in-depth interview with 18 informants was conducted, and data were collected from senior management positions in the zakat distribution department, academicians who are experts in the area of zakat, and heads of Shariah departments in IFI.

Findings

Expanding the interpretation of gharimin could help ZI and IFI recover the sustainability of gharimin for preparedness during post-pandemic and any emergency crisis in the future.

Practical implications

This study implies the potential role of ZI in combating the risk of defaulting debtors in IFI to prepare for pandemic recovery in the future.

Social implications

The new interpretation assists gharimin in reducing the burden debt using the zakat fund and protects genuine debtors by preventing IFI from declaring default or bankruptcy.

Originality/value

This study narrows the literature gaps about gharimin in IFI in the context of the pandemic. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is, perhaps, the first paper to present the expansion of interpretation for gharimin into mu’sir in IFI in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2023

Ismah Osman, Sharifah Faigah Syed Alwi, Mohsin Abdur Rehman, Ruhaini Muda, Faridah Hassan, Rohail Hassan and Hasni Abdullah

This study aims to empirically investigate the pathway to financial management behavioural intentions (FMBI) from Islamic perspectives, through dimensions of Islamic financial…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically investigate the pathway to financial management behavioural intentions (FMBI) from Islamic perspectives, through dimensions of Islamic financial literacy (IFL; Islamic financial knowledge [IFK], financial skills [FS] and self-efficacy [SE]) based on an extension to the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected via a self-administered questionnaire by 300 millennials (Muslims) working in Malaysia. Structural equation modelling was used for data analysis purposes by using SmartPLS.

Findings

The results present the positive and significant influence of IFK on financial attitude (FA), FS on the elements of FA, subjective norm (SN), perceived behavioural control (PBC) and perceived moral obligation (PMO), SE on FA, FS on the elements of FA, SN and PBC. Furthermore, PBC and PMO were strong predictors of FMBI from an Islamic standpoint.

Originality/value

The findings successfully contribute to the theoretical extension of the TPB model via dimensions of IFL (IFK, FS and SE) as predictors of FA, SNs, PBC and PMO. Besides, this study provides some new insights of millennial Muslims concerning IFL and financial management from Islamic beliefs.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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