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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Siti Khomsatun, Hilda Rossieta, Fitriany Fitriany and Mustafa Edwin Nasution

The unique characteristic of Islamic bank leads in governance and disclosure. Using stakeholder, signaling, and market discipline theory, governance and adequate disclosure

Abstract

The unique characteristic of Islamic bank leads in governance and disclosure. Using stakeholder, signaling, and market discipline theory, governance and adequate disclosure may increase bank soundness. This study aims to investigate the relationship of sharia disclosure and Sharia Supervisory Board in influencing Islamic bank soundness in the different regulatory framework of the country. Using purposive sampling, the research covered 84 Islamic banks in 16 countries during the period 2013–2015 with lag data of Islamic bank soundness. The result shows sharia disclosure influences on Islamic bank soundness for management efficiency, capital adequacy ratio, asset quality, and liquidity. The results also show that sharia disclosure mediates the indirect effect of SSB on Islamic bank soundness. The regulatory framework (sharia accounting standard and SSB regulation) shows moderating effect of regulation framework proved on the association of sharia disclosure with management efficiency, capital, and liquidity. The effect is indirectly depending on the regulatory framework for proxy management efficiency, capital, and liquidity. The implication of the research suggests that sharia disclosure could increase the market discipline mechanism of Islamic bank stream. The Islamic bank can increase the transparency using sharia disclosure as a branding for increasing public trust, even though in the deficient Islamic bank regulation countries.

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Recent Developments in Asian Economics International Symposia in Economic Theory and Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-359-8

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Anna Che Azmi, Norazlin Ab Aziz, Normawati Non and Rusnah Muhamad

This paper aims to examine the reasons behind the low level of Sharia-related disclosures, particularly Sharia-compliant companies, to gain an understanding on how these…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the reasons behind the low level of Sharia-related disclosures, particularly Sharia-compliant companies, to gain an understanding on how these companies disclose Sharia-related information in their annual reports, and how professional users of these reports search for such disclosures.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is an exploratory research based on structured interviews with individuals involved in the preparation of annual reports of Sharia-compliant companies and professional users of annual reports.

Findings

Most Sharia-compliant companies and professional users interviewed agree that the most relevant Sharia-related information is most commonly understood as the information found in the financial statement and its notes (accounting-related disclosures). Their responses indicate that there is a disjoint between the conventional disclosure practices on corporate social responsibility items and the Sharia-related information.

Research limitations/implications

The idea of full disclosure needs to be further understood from the perspectives of Sharia. This study provides insights into the types of Sharia-related information that are important for disclosure. Future research should focus on examining a larger number of companies and interviewing more professional users from different jurisdictions to generate more knowledge about the nature of Sharia information and its disclosure.

Practical implications

Users of the Sharia screening methods, especially regulators, such as the Securities Commission Malaysia should encourage the disclosure of the required aspects of Sharia in the annual reports of Sharia-compliant companies, as professional users are interested in this type of information.

Originality/value

This study offers insights into the reasons behind low Sharia disclosures in annual reports of Sharia-compliant companies.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2017

Sherif El-Halaby, Khaled Hussainey and Abdullah Al-Maghzom

The authors measure the impact of culture on Sharia; Social and Financial Disclosure (SSFD) of Islamic Banks (IBs) around the world.Content analysis is used to measure…

Abstract

The authors measure the impact of culture on Sharia; Social and Financial Disclosure (SSFD) of Islamic Banks (IBs) around the world.

Content analysis is used to measure levels of disclosure for a sample of 136 IBs of 25 countries for years 2013 and 2014. Different cultural measures are used. These include secrecy/transparency as suggested by Gray (1988) and Hofstede (1980, 1983, 2001, 2010)’s culture dimensions which include: Power Distance; Individualism; Masculinity; Uncertainty Avoidance; Long-Term Ordination and Indulgence. Ordinary least square (OLS) regression is used to test the research hypotheses.

After controlling bank-specific, corporate governance and country characteristics, the authors found that Hofstede’s culture dimensions have a significant impact on SSFD. They also found that Gray's transparency dimension positively influence levels of sharia, social and aggregated disclosure. Therefore, they conclude that culture influences levels of disclosure in IBs.

This study has policy implications for managers and regulators of Islamic banking industry.

This study is the first to use both Gray and Hofstede models in the context of IBs around the world. It also the first to explore the impact of culture on three different disclosure levels for IBs.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-527-6

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Rania Kamla and Hussain G. Rammal

This study examines social reporting by Islamic banks with special emphasis on themes related to social justice. By using critical theory and “immanent critique”, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines social reporting by Islamic banks with special emphasis on themes related to social justice. By using critical theory and “immanent critique”, the study attempts to explain and delineate reasons for disclosures and silences in Islamic banks ' annual reports and web sites vis-à-vis social justice.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken was a content analysis of annual reports and web sites of 19 Islamic banks.

Findings

Islamic banks ' disclosures emphasise their religious character through claims that they adhere to Sharia ' s teachings. Their disclosures, however, lack specific or detailed information regarding schemes or initiatives vis-à-vis poverty eradication or enhancing social justice.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations associated with content analysis of annual reports and internet web sites apply. This study focuses on Islamic banks ' social roles. Further studies of banks ' social roles in society in general are of interest.

Practical implications

Drawing attention of Islamic banks and other stakeholders to the gap between the rhetorical religious and ethical claims of Islamic banks and their activities (as depicted through their disclosures) opens up the possibility of a positive change in Islamic banks ' actual social roles.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in both social accounting and Islamic accounting literatures with its emphasis on social justice and poverty eradication. The study contributes to the very scarce literature linking religion (especially Islam), critical theory, social accounting and Islamic accounting. It goes beyond previous research in Islamic accounting literature by exposing contradictions in the Islamic banking industry ' s rhetoric regarding their social role in society.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Anna Che Azmi and Mohamed Hisham Hanifa

– This study aims to examine whether the financial reporting practices of organisations managing waqf (Islamic endowed trust funds) are Sharia-compliant.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether the financial reporting practices of organisations managing waqf (Islamic endowed trust funds) are Sharia-compliant.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a case study of two Islamic-based organisations that manage waqf. The financial statements of these organisations are analysed using content analysis to assess their compliance with the Accounting and Auditing Organisation for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI) Sharia Standard No. 33 (SS 33) on waqf.

Findings

The authors found that both Islamic-based organisations use different sets of accounting procedures and practices, but that these accounting practices do not contradict the Sharia requirements prescribed in the SS 33 on waqf. However, the SS 33 on waqf requires that waqf funds to be utilised as stipulated by the waqif (donor) and that the accounting practices of both organisations do not adequately address this disclosure requirement. This study also found that the existing accounting practices adopted by organisations that manage waqf need to incorporate more disclosure on their Sharia-based financing and their investment of waqf funds.

Research limitations/implications

This study found that the AAOIFI’s SS33 on waqf is a useful guide for identifying the gap between Sharia principles and conventional financial reporting practices for non-profit organisations, and that there are aspects of Sharia-based disclosure practices that are not adequately implemented in financial reporting practices of institutions managing waqf.

Practical implications

This study proposes two essential Sharia-based disclosure practices for Islamic-based organisations that manage Islamic-based funds such as waqf. These two aspects are the disclosure on whether waqf funds are adequately utilised as stipulated by the waqif (donor) and what modifications to their existing financial reporting of their Sharia-based financing and investments are required to comply with the unique nature of waqf.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how Sharia principles can be incorporated into the financial reporting practices of organisations that manage Islamic-based funds such as waqf.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Sherif El-Halaby and Khaled Hussainey

The authors explore the level and determinants of compliance with Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institution’s (AAOIFI) financial and…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore the level and determinants of compliance with Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institution’s (AAOIFI) financial and governance standards by Islamic banks (IBs).

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 43 IBs across eight countries. The authors use ordinary least squares regression analyses to examine the impact of bank-specific characteristics and corporate governance (CG) mechanisms concerned with Board of Directors (BOD) and Sharia Supervisory Board (SSB) on the levels of compliance with AAOIFI standards.

Findings

The paper finds that the average compliance level based on AAOIFI standards concerning the SSB is 68 per cent; corporate social responsibility (CSR) is 27 per cent; and presentation of financial statements (FSs) is 73 per cent. The aggregate disclosure based on the three indices is 56 per cent. The analysis also shows that size, existing Sharia-auditing department, age and CG of SSB are the main determinants of compliance levels.

Originality/value

The determinants of compliance with AAOIFI standards for IBs around the world have not been explored before, and therefore, this paper is the first of its kind to this issue.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Peni Nugraheni and Erlinda Nur Khasanah

The purpose of this study is to discuss the extent to which Indonesian Islamic banks (IBs) disclose corporate social responsibility (CSR) according to the Accounting and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to discuss the extent to which Indonesian Islamic banks (IBs) disclose corporate social responsibility (CSR) according to the Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI) index. It also empirically examines the determinants of CSR disclosure in Indonesian IBs, based on disclosure from AAOIFI index, which is based on Islamic principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The determinant used in this paper is the corporate governance (CG) mechanism, which focuses on the board of commissioners (BOC) and Sharia Supervisory Board (SSB) and their characteristics. The paper uses multiple regression analysis to examine the influence of these variables on CSR.

Findings

The results indicate that the level of CSR disclosure of IBs measured by the AAOIFI index continues to be low. The statistical results reveal that CSR disclosure has an insignificant relationship with BOC size and SSB qualifications, while the other results show a negative association between the composition of independent BOCs and CSR disclosure, and the frequency of BOC and SSB meeting has a positive effect on this.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on Indonesian IBs. The variables of the CG mechanism are limited to the BOC and SSB, while the BOC exists only in countries that adopt two-tier boards.

Practical implications

IBs should provide a wider range of information to be disclosed. The government should establish specific items that need to be disclosed by IBs, considering there are no specific CSR disclosure regulations for IBs in Indonesia.

Originality/value

This study uses the AAOIFI index, which may be a suitable measure of CSR in IBs. The study also analyzes why certain items in the index have a high disclosure level and others do not.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Sherif El-Halaby, Khaled Hussainey and Heba Abou-El-Sood

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of sharia, social and financial disclosure on stakeholders’ loyalty towards Islamic banks (IBs). The paper also aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of sharia, social and financial disclosure on stakeholders’ loyalty towards Islamic banks (IBs). The paper also aims to examine the extent to which trust and satisfaction mediate this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

It uses data collected from 600 respondents to survey questionnaires disseminated to stakeholders from 15 countries dealing with IBs. Structural equation modelling is adopted with a partial least square approach.

Findings

The results indicate that there is a significant impact of disclosure on stakeholders’ trust, satisfaction, and loyalty. The results also indicate that there is a partial mediating effect of trust and satisfaction in the relationship between disclosure and loyalty. This paper is one of the first studies examining the effect of disclosure on stakeholders’ loyalty. The authors provide novel findings, which have theoretical and practical implications for disclosure in IBs and their relationship with stakeholders.

Originality/value

The analysis offers a novel contribution to the Islamic banking literature by offering the first evidence on the impact of disclosure on stakeholders’ trust, satisfaction, and loyalty.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Sherif El-Halaby, Sameh Aboul-Dahab and Nuha Bin Qoud

This paper aims to systematically review the existing studies for Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI) standards which include…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to systematically review the existing studies for Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI) standards which include different tracks of researches and then identify the gaps to propose opportunities for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting a systematic literature review approach, 46 papers that were published between 2000 and 2020 from 23 journals concerned with AAOIFI were selected for review and analysis.

Findings

The authors combine electronic searches to identify relevant studies using keywords such as “AAOIFI” or and “Islamic standards.” In light of the existing studies’ limitations, this paper derives and summarizes five leading future research tracks: identifies the research gaps in AAOIFI and then suggests that AAOIFI still requires more empirical analyses; identifies the alternative analytical methods as meta-analysis; identifies additional measurements for macro and microeconomics factors; identifies recent tracks as corresponding to Covid-19 pandemic; and future studies should consider the role of central banks and positive criticism for AAOIFI.

Practical implications

This analysis address the literature gaps on measuring compliance, determinants and consequences of AAOIFI adoption as this study serves as a guide for the researchers, regulators and Islamic financial institutions in research associated with this area. The findings would support AAOIFI, regulators and related authorities across jurisdictions with suggestions on improving the current AAOIFI practices.

Originality/value

This literature review is a historical record and guidance for researchers who seek to examine and explore several questions about AAOIFI. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that applies systematic literature review over AAOIFI research field.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Abstract

Details

Recent Developments in Asian Economics International Symposia in Economic Theory and Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-359-8

1 – 10 of 310