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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Ahmed M. Aljazea and Shaomin Wu

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to analyse the existing work of warranty risk management (WaRM); second, to develop a generic WaRM framework; and third, to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to analyse the existing work of warranty risk management (WaRM); second, to develop a generic WaRM framework; and third, to design a generic taxonomy for warranty hazards from a warranty chain perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the top warranty hazards, the authors designed a questionnaire, received 40 responses from the warranty decision makers (WDM) in the automotive industry in the UK and then analysed the responses.

Findings

The assembly process capability at suppliers is the top contributor to warranty incidents from the suppliers’ and original equipment manufacturers’ (OEMs’) viewpoints. The human error at different stages of the product lifecycle contributes to the occurrence of warranty incidents. The collaboration among parties, particularly, the accessibility to warranty-related data between parties (i.e. suppliers, OEM and dealers), is limited. Customers’ fraud contributes more to warranty costs than warranty services providers’ fraud. The top contributors to customer dissatisfaction relating to warranty are the warranty service time and service quality.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaires were used to collect data in the UK, which implies the research outcomes of this paper may only reflect the UK area.

Practical implications

The WaRM framework and taxonomy proposed in this paper provide WDM with a holistic view to identifying the top contributors to warranty incidents. With them, the decision makers will be able to allocate the required fund and efforts more effectively.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by providing the first work of systematically analysing the top contributors to warranty incidents and costs and by providing a WaRM framework.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Shaomin Wu, Keith Neale, Michael Williamson and Matthew Hornby

The purpose of this study is to highlight special characteristics of building services systems and investigate how practitioners view reliability and maintenance. These…

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2021

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to highlight special characteristics of building services systems and investigate how practitioners view reliability and maintenance. These characteristics include energy‐hungry services systems, operating modes, maintenance types, the relationship between procurement costs and maintenance costs.

Design/methodology/approach

The practitioners' viewpoints on reliability and maintenance are explored through a workshop. The authors wish to draw the attention of researchers in the reliability and maintenance community and furthermore emphasise the difference between building services systems and systems in industries other than construction.

Findings

It is shown that a lack of failure data and maintenance data is the main problem from both academic researchers' and industrial practitioner's points of view. The paper suggests that there exists no fixed cost ratio available to apply to building services systems; the analysis of RAMS (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety) should include duty cycles and the environment; and clients of the construction industry would benefit from mandating a LCC to be applied to the build.

Practical implications

The gap between academia and practitioners should be bridged through better understanding each other's needs. Accurately estimating the ratio between procurement and maintenance costs is needed from a whole life costing perspective.

Originality/value

This paper is a good reference for building designers, facility managers and maintenance staff of building services systems. It also offers reliability researchers references on special characteristics of building services systems.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Shaomin Wu, Derek Clements‐Croome, Vic Fairey, Bob Albany, Jogi Sidhu, Duncan Desmond and Keith Neale

The purpose of this research is to show that reliability analysis and its implementation will lead to an improved whole life performance of the building systems, and hence…

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2745

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to show that reliability analysis and its implementation will lead to an improved whole life performance of the building systems, and hence their life cycle costs (LCC).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses reliability impacts on the whole life cycle of building systems, and reviews the up‐to‐date approaches adopted in UK construction, based on questionnaires designed to investigate the use of reliability within the industry.

Findings

Approaches to reliability design and maintainability design have been introduced from the operating environment level, system structural level and component level, and a scheduled maintenance logic tree is modified based on the model developed by Pride. Different stages of the whole life cycle of building services systems, reliability‐associated factors should be considered to ensure the system's whole life performance. It is suggested that data analysis should be applied in reliability design, maintainability design, and maintenance policy development.

Originality/value

The paper presents important factors in different stages of the whole life cycle of the systems, and reliability and maintainability design approaches which can be helpful for building services system designers. The survey from the questionnaires provides the designers with understanding of key impacting factors.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Shaomin He, Huan Yang, Guangzhuo Li, Sideng Hu and Xiangning He

This paper aims to analyze the dominant stray parameters of the DC bus bar and focus on weakening the influence of the stray parameters instead of reducing the value of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the dominant stray parameters of the DC bus bar and focus on weakening the influence of the stray parameters instead of reducing the value of the stray parameters in DC bus bar while switching. By finding the mechanisms to reduce the effects of stray parameters on switching transient, the simple and straightforward optimization methods could be given for the engineering designer.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigations are focused on the equivalent circuit by segmented impedance evaluation in the low-frequency band and the energy propagation by wave impedance evaluation in the high frequency band. This paper proposes an equivalent impedance calculation model to locate the dominant stray parameters in the DC bus bar and takes the energy propagation characteristics using wave impedance into consideration, which can simplify the optimization design of DC bus bar.

Findings

According to the equivalent circuit and electromagnetic field analysis, this paper proves the existence of the dominant stray parameters in DC bus bar that is widely used on high-power converters and certifies that not all the stray parameters in different areas of DC bus bar have the same effects on switching process, which can give a good guidance for the optimization design of DC bus bar.

Originality/value

The positions of DC-link capacitors, resulting in only part of stray parameters in DC bus bar has more impact during switching, are significant to the DC bus bar optimization design. These stray parameters named dominant stray parameters in this paper play a leading role in the switching transient process. The area of DC bus bar, which is close to IGBTs and far from DC-link capacitors, contains the dominant stray parameters in the switching transient process. Therefore, the distance between DC-link capacitors and IGBTs should be shortened as much as possible. Based on the results, the efficiency for the DC bus bar optimization design could be improved by weakening the influence of the stray parameters, such as reducing the dominant stray parameters only. Therefore, it can save the cost and time of DC bus bar optimization design.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering , vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Shaomin Li and Matthew Farrell

Answering the call to study important issues in the real world (Buckley et al., 2017; Delios, 2017; Phan, 2019), and motivated by the trade war between the US and China…

Abstract

Purpose

Answering the call to study important issues in the real world (Buckley et al., 2017; Delios, 2017; Phan, 2019), and motivated by the trade war between the US and China, the authors look beyond it to examine the more fundamental issues behind it. From a political economy perspective, the authors examine the interplay of government, society and firms in China to identify new phenomena that may impact business with, and research on, China.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-case qualitative method is used to present and analyze evidence and develop our arguments. Specifically, we use scholarly sources, anecdotal evidence, reports, statistics and government documents and policies to support our arguments.

Findings

After four decades of economic reform, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) controls every aspect of the society. Living, working and doing business are not a right but a privilege granted by the party. To a great degree, state-owned firms are business units/subsidiaries, and private/foreign firms are franchisees of the party, with the party leader being the CEO of China, Inc. The interplay between China and other countries is essentially a competition between a huge corporation and other states.

Practical implications

At the firm level, our study suggests that for MNCs dealing with Chinese firms, they need to know that Chinese firms are units of China, Inc. Practitioners should take into account the long-term strategic goals of the CCP as well as business considerations when dealing with Chinese partners or competitors.

Social implications

At the country level, our study shows that other countries dealing with China must be aware that they are dealing with a huge corporation.

Originality/value

That the CCP runs China as a corporation is a new perspective that will help the international community reexamine global competition.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2018

Shaomin Li, Seung Ho Park and Rosey Shuji Bao

The purpose of this paper is to use the framework of rule-based and relation-based governance to examine the evolution of governance environment in the East Asian region…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the framework of rule-based and relation-based governance to examine the evolution of governance environment in the East Asian region including China, South Korea and Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Both qualitative and quantitative evidences are presented to demonstrate the paths these East Asian countries take in their transitions from relation-based governance to rule-based governance. Based on the framework, this analysis sheds light on the debate on whether East Asian economies will eventually move away from relation-based governance to rule-based societies.

Findings

The authors find that relation-based governance has helped East Asian countries achieve rapid economic growth in the early stages of their development. However, as the scale and scope of East Asian economies expand, continuing to rely on it may hinder their further development and therefore these countries should adopt a rule-based governance system in order to be efficient and competitive in the world market. While South Korea and Taiwan have made substantial progress in this transition, China has just embarked on the process.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to systematically review the theories and evidence of the transition and the challenges East Asian countries face during the process.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Sahrok Kim, K. Praveen Parboteeah and John B. Cullen

Until recently, the business environment was characterized by a world in which nations were more connected than ever before. Unfortunately, the outbreak of coronavirus…

Abstract

Until recently, the business environment was characterized by a world in which nations were more connected than ever before. Unfortunately, the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has virtually ended the borderless and globalized world we were accustomed to. The World Health Organization (WHO) officially declared COVID-19 a pandemic at a news conference in Geneva on March 11, 2020. The multifaceted nature of this invisible virus is impacting the world at many levels, and this unprecedented pandemic may best be characterized as an economic and health war against humanity. More international cooperation is crucial for effectively dealing with the present pandemic (and future pandemics) because all nations are vulnerable, and it is highly unlikely that any pandemic would affect only one country. Therefore, this case study takes a sociological approach, examining various social institutions and cultural facets (i.e., government, press freedom, information technology [IT] infrastructure, healthcare systems, and institutional collectivism) to understand how South Korea is handling the crisis while drawing important implications for other countries. All aspects of how Korea is handling COVID-19 may not be applicable to other countries, such as those with fewer IT infrastructures and less institutional collectivism. However, its methods still offer profound insights into how countries espousing democratic values rooted in openness and transparency to both domestic and worldwide communities can help overcome the current challenge. As such, the authors believe that Korea's innovative approach and experience can inform other nations dealing with COVD-19, while also leading to greater international collaboration for better preparedness when such pandemics occur in the future. This case study also considers implications for both public policy and organization, and the authors pose critical questions and offer practical solutions for dealing with the current pandemic.

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Shaomin Li

The purpose of this paper is to use parking behavior as a direct measure of delayed gratification, a cultural trait recognized by scholars as contributing to people's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use parking behavior as a direct measure of delayed gratification, a cultural trait recognized by scholars as contributing to people's economic success. Backing into a parking space requires more time and effort, but it will enable the driver to exit more easily, safely, and quickly in the future. The author argue that people who park their cars back-in embody a culture of delayed gratification, and societies with a higher back-in parking rate tend to have better economic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The author tested the hypothesis using parking and economic data from the BRIC countries, Taiwan, and the USA.

Findings

Results show that there is a strong positive relationship between back-in parking and labor productivity gains. The author also found that back-in parking positively correlates with economic growth, savings rate, and educational attainment.

Originality/value

This is the first study that uses parking behavior to predict economic performance. The feasibility of collecting parking behavior data across countries provides a new and viable way to overcome the limitation of relying on attitudinal or experimental data to measure the culture and behaviors of delayed gratification. The author therefore call for a collective effort to establish a “Global Parking Index.” Such an index will help us better understand parking behavior and how it may relate to socioeconomic performance such as learning, saving, and investing.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

H. Holly Wang, Shaomin Huang, Linxiu Zhang, Scott Rozelle and Yuanyuan Yan

Since 1999, China has undergone reform of its healthcare system. City‐based social health insurance (SHI) is the primary form of current health insurance, supplemented by…

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1534

Abstract

Purpose

Since 1999, China has undergone reform of its healthcare system. City‐based social health insurance (SHI) is the primary form of current health insurance, supplemented by various commercial health insurance programs. The rural new cooperative medical system (NCMS) was introduced in 1993 and extended to cover the whole of rural China in 2003.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper developed a theoretical model for consumer demand of medical services and health insurance based on an expected utility framework with a two‐stage decision under uncertainty. The model is then applied to current health insurance systems in China for urban citizens and rural residents separately. Least square and logistic regressions are employed.

Findings

The major results are that although the factors driving the decisions on health insurance participation are basically the same for rural and urban citizens, the participation levels are quite different. The major difference is that urban SHI has higher coverage and urban citizens have higher income, resulting in a much larger urban medical expenditure.

Practical implications

The empirical analysis reveals that health insurance programs have played an important role in the healthcare expenditure for urban residents, while the NCMS has not made a significant impact towards increasing the ability of rural residents to seek more medical services, based on data at 2004.

Originality/value

This is the first paper employing a health production theory on China's new urban and rural healthcare programs.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Ian Bathgate, Maktoba Omar, Sonny Nwankwo and Yinan Zhang

The research objective was to assess the challenges of transition that firms face in adopting a market orientation in China, as the basis for providing a context‐specific…

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1841

Abstract

Purpose

The research objective was to assess the challenges of transition that firms face in adopting a market orientation in China, as the basis for providing a context‐specific explanation of market orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample from the He Bei Light Industry Directory was selected by the systematic‐selection‐from‐lists procedure. The survey instrument was adapted from the widely used MARKOR scale.

Findings

Although some of the early results are consistent with those obtained in the West, an underlying lacuna needs to be addressed in order for a useful culture‐sensitive interpretation of market orientation to be offered vis‐à‐vis locale‐specific knowledge.

Research implications/limitations

While there can be little doubt that market orientation delivers superior performance in developed western economies, implementations in many transition‐economy contexts reveal a range of paradoxes, which point to some gaps in both the theory and practice of marketing.

Originality/value

A useful explanation of market orientation in transition economies should necessarily embed an approach that accommodates the institutional peculiarities of the environment under study, focusing the temporal, spatial and wider socio‐cultural and historical characteristics of marketing itself.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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