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Article

Ayman Issa and Hong-Xing Fang

This study aims to examine the impact of board gender diversity on the level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure in the Arab Gulf states. Also, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of board gender diversity on the level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure in the Arab Gulf states. Also, this research further aims to explore whether the impact of board gender diversity varies across the Arab Gulf states.

Design/methodology/approach

Ordinary least squares regression is used in this study to test the impact of board gender diversity on the level of CSR disclosure. Manual content analysis is used to evaluate the extent of CSR disclosure in annual reports, stand-alone CSR reports, sustainability reports and website sections to examine the relationship between the extent of CSR reporting and board gender diversity. This study uses the global reporting initiative (GRI) fourth version reporting guidelines to design and define the classifications of CSR reporting checklist.

Findings

The findings show that there is a statistically significant relationship between the number of female directors and the level of CSR disclosure. The results show that board gender diversity is positively associated with the level of CSR reporting in two countries, namely, Bahrain and Kuwait. Also, the findings reveal that there is a weak positive relationship between the presence of women on the boards and CSR reporting index in Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

Originality/value

This study attempts to fill the gap in the literature, in that no similar study covers the Arab Gulf countries as one economic unit. The study is unique in that it focuses on oil-rich countries. This study is, to the best of this researcher’s knowledge, the first to explore the impact of women’s boards on the extent of CSR reporting, as well as investigating the possible variation of board gender diversity impact on the extent of CSR reporting in the Arabian Gulf region.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Book part

Rhiannon A. Leebrick

This chapter provides theoretical conceptualizations to (1) better understand the phenomenon of rural gentrification and (2) the links between rural gentrification and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides theoretical conceptualizations to (1) better understand the phenomenon of rural gentrification and (2) the links between rural gentrification and regional tourism development, using a case study in south central Appalachia.

Methodology/approach

This ethnographic study relies on the results of a series of interviews and instances of participant observation.

Findings

Affluent newcomers often implement development projects through the injection of private capital into public-seeming projects like community-based organizations (CBOs). These projects offer partial solutions to the problem of failing local economies. However, they also have the potential to reinforce class structures and push narrowly perceived development processes.

Practical implications

A critical evaluation of rural gentrification may be useful to CBOs and local governments leading development projects in rural areas.

Originality/value

The phenomenon of rural gentrification warrants critical examination of current development agendas being proposed or implemented.

Details

States and Citizens: Accommodation, Facilitation and Resistance to Globalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-180-4

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Book part

Paul Paolucci, Micah Holland and Shannon Williams

Machiavelli's dictums in The Prince (1977) instigated the modern discourse on power. Arguing that “there's such a difference between the way we really live and the way we…

Abstract

Machiavelli's dictums in The Prince (1977) instigated the modern discourse on power. Arguing that “there's such a difference between the way we really live and the way we ought to live that the man who neglects the real to study the ideal will learn to accomplish his ruin, not his salvation” (Machiavelli, 1977, p. 44), his approach is a realist one. In this text, Machiavelli (1977, p. 3) endeavors to “discuss the rule of princes” and to “lay down principles for them.” Taking his lead, Foucault (1978, p. 97) argued that “if it is true that Machiavelli was among the few…who conceived the power of the Prince in terms of force relationships, perhaps we need to go one step further, do without the persona of the Prince, and decipher mechanisms on the basis of a strategy that is immanent in force relationships.” He believed that we should “investigate…how mechanisms of power have been able to function…how these mechanisms…have begun to become economically advantageous and politically useful…in a given context for specific reasons,” and, therefore, “we should…base our analysis of power on the study of the techniques and tactics of domination” (Foucault, 1980, pp. 100–102). Conceptualizing such techniques and tactics as the “art of governance”, Foucault (1991), examined power as strategies geared toward managing civic populations through shaping people's dispositions and behaviors.

Details

Social Theory as Politics in Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-363-1

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Article

Carol Byrd‐Bredbenner, Angela Wong and Peta Cottee

This study evaluated and compared the abilities of women (n = 50) between the ages of 25 and 45 residing in the UK to locate and manipulate information on nutrition labels…

Abstract

This study evaluated and compared the abilities of women (n = 50) between the ages of 25 and 45 residing in the UK to locate and manipulate information on nutrition labels prepared in accordance with US regulations (i.e. Nutrition Facts labels) and those prepared in accordance with the EU Directive and UK Food Labelling Regulations 1996. It also assessed their ability to assess the accuracy of nutrient content claims. Study findings indicate that the women could locate and manipulate information on both labels equally well. However, they were significantly more able to assess nutrient content claims using the Nutrition Facts label. The research findings suggest EU labelling changes that may facilitate consumer use of labels in making dietary planning decisions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Vikki Pollard, Andrew Vincent and Emily Wilson

– This paper aims to explore the pedagogical approach of two higher education programmes aiming to develop both discipline-specific and key employability skills in graduates.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the pedagogical approach of two higher education programmes aiming to develop both discipline-specific and key employability skills in graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents two case studies of degree programs in the broad field of the creative industries and focusses on the innovative pedagogy adopted based on a “learning to be” approach (McWilliam, 2008).

Findings

The two case studies describe a different type of pedagogy taken up at one mixed-sector institution over two degree programs. The degrees offered within this institution are recognised as being vocationally oriented yet productive of the higher-order skills expected of degree programs. The case studies illustrate this through a pedagogy designed to orientate the students towards the development of a sense of identity whilst also placing them within the broader professional context of the discipline.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for educators in the field and points towards the need to consider the broader professional context of the students in the course design and review phases of programmes in the creative industries.

Originality/value

It is hoped the findings will be useful to educators and curriculum developers in other creative industries’ higher education programs with a vocational orientation to inform future course design, review and planning.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Social Theory as Politics in Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-363-1

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Book part

Abstract

Details

Social Theory as Politics in Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-363-1

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Article

Nelson Ositadimma Oranye, Bernadine Wallis, Nora Ahmad and Zaklina Aguilar

Different organisations have developed policies and programmes to prevent workplace injuries and facilitate return to work. Few multiple workplace studies have examined…

Abstract

Purpose

Different organisations have developed policies and programmes to prevent workplace injuries and facilitate return to work. Few multiple workplace studies have examined workers’ perceptions of these policies and programmes. The purpose of this paper is to compare workers’ perception and experience of workplace policies and practices on injury prevention, people-oriented work culture, and return to work.

Design/methodology/approach

This study recruited 118 workers from three healthcare facilities through an online and paper survey.

Findings

Work-related musculoskeletal injury was experienced by 46 per cent of the workers, with low back injuries being most prevalent. There were significant differences in perception of policies and practices for injury prevention among occupational groups, and between workers who have had previous workplace injury experience and those without past injury.

Research limitations/implications

Selection bias is possible because of voluntary participation. A larger sample could give stronger statistical power.

Practical implications

The perception of workplace policies can vary depending on workers’ occupational and injury status. Organisational managers need to pay attention to the diversity among workers when designing and implementing injury prevention and return to work policies.

Social implications

Risks for workplace injuries are related to multiple factors, including workplace policies and practices on health and safety. Workers’ understanding and response to the policies, programmes, and practices can determine injury outcomes.

Originality/value

No previous study has reported on workers’ perceptions of workplace policies and practices for injury prevention and return in Manitoba healthcare sector.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Shamant Prakash, Shannon Brown, Michelle Murphy and Brett Williams

Current statistics highlight the increasing prevalence of homelessness in Australia, however, there is scant research regarding empathy and homelessness in the paramedic…

Abstract

Purpose

Current statistics highlight the increasing prevalence of homelessness in Australia, however, there is scant research regarding empathy and homelessness in the paramedic literature. Research in other areas of healthcare demonstrates that interaction with the homeless can positively impact empathetic attitudes and also highlights the opportunity to examine if these results are consistent or generalisable to the Australian paramedic profession. Therefore, the aim of our study was to explore paramedic students' empathetic attitudes towards homelessness.

Design/methodology/approach

A sequential mixed method design study was undertaken using a repeated measures and focus group approach. Paramedic students participated in clinical experience, involving interactions with the homeless. This entailed participating in at least four shifts (11 pm – 5 am) where students gained experience at the Salvation Army Health Café or with the Youth Street Teams in Melbourne, Australia. Empathy levels of the paramedic students toward homelessness, both pre- and post- were measured using the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS) and the Health Professionals' Attitudes Toward the Homeless Inventory (HPATHI). A focus group with student participants was also conducted to obtain further detailed information about their perceptions of the experience.

Findings

A total of 20 students participated (100% response rate). Statistically significant (p < 0.05) increases were observed on the MCRS pre- to post- data with total mean scores of 48.35 (SD ± 8.33) and 51.65 (SD ± 5.56), respectively. On the HPATHI a statistically significant (p < 0.0001) increase in Personal Advocacy was observed. Eight of these students took part in a subsequent focus group. Following thematic analysis of the focus group, a number of common themes were identified that included: communication, empathy and rapport, and a change in perception and attitude.

Originality/value

The results of this pilot study demonstrate that through participation in a project involving experience interacting with the homeless population, paramedic students showed a greater level of empathy towards the homeless. Increases in empathetic regard, social advocacy and personal advocacy were also found.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Business and Corporation Engagement with Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-656-1

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