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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Shannon L.L. Lloyd and Charmine E.J. Härtel

International human resource management (IHRM) is becoming increasingly fundamental to organisational success, as globalisation forces demand organisations to design and…

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Abstract

International human resource management (IHRM) is becoming increasingly fundamental to organisational success, as globalisation forces demand organisations to design and implement a global strategy. One of the most critical choices faced by IHRM practitioners is whether and when an organisation should adapt its human resource policies and practices to the local context (localisation). A typology of International Human Resource Management Orientations (IHRMO) that clarifies what IHRMO’s are and what they entail is developed from a review of the literature on localisation and globalisation, convergence and divergence and Perlmutter’s management typology. Additionally, two theoretical models are developed that predict which IHRM orientation identified in the typology should be adopted. The article takes a step towards elucidating effective IHRM strategy and practice decision‐making by showing that culture and institutional pressures, amongst other tings, do make a difference.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Shannon Lloyd and Charmine Härtel

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact that the level of individuals' intercultural competencies has on their satisfaction, trust and affective commitment and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact that the level of individuals' intercultural competencies has on their satisfaction, trust and affective commitment and assessment of their work team.

Design/methodology/approach

An intercultural competencies classification system is developed in which the cognitive, affective and behavioural intercultural competencies predicted to impact upon individuals' responses toward, and assessments of, their work team are identified. The results of quantitative survey research providing support for the classification system are subsequently described.

Findings

Competencies identified as being related to individuals' responses toward, and assessments of, their work team include cognitive complexity, goal orientation, dissimilarity openness, tolerance for ambiguity and emotion, and conflict management skills.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides sound evidence for the important role that intercultural competence plays in facilitating positive individual level outcomes which it is theorised will lead to positive team level outcomes.

Originality/value

The key contribution of the research is the development of an intercultural competencies classification system which ties together in a single but multifaceted framework the intercultural competencies required for employees working in culturally diverse teams.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Eziyi O. Ibem and O.O. Amole

The purpose of this paper is to present research assessing the level of qualitative adequacy of newly constructed public housing in urban centres in Ogun State, Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present research assessing the level of qualitative adequacy of newly constructed public housing in urban centres in Ogun State, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/ approach

The study followed a quantitative research strategy. A survey of 517 housing units constructed through four different strategies and selected based on quota of their existence in nine public housing estates was conducted with a questionnaire as the key data collection instrument. A five‐point Likert scale was used in measuring the level of qualitative adequacy of four key housing sub‐components. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics.

Findings

Residents found the overall housing to be inadequate; they indicated that housing unit attributes were the most adequate and thus contributed most, while neighbourhood facilities were the least inadequate and contributed the least to qualitative housing adequacy.

Research limitations/implications

The sample population comprised mainly house heads in public housing constructed between 2003 and 2009 therefore, the findings may not be considered to be applicable to all the public housing in the study area. However, the findings can form the basis for judging the performance of public housing in the current democratic dispensation in the study area.

Practical implications

The findings imply that giving adequate attention to the provision of infrastructural facilities and maintenance of existing ones can enhance the qualitative adequacy of public housing.

Originality/value

This paper is a pioneering effort at evaluating the qualitative adequacy of most recently constructed public housing in the study area.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

A. Niroshan Siriwardena, Tracy Wilburn and Louise Hazelwood

The background is that clinical governance is a new mechanism for improving patient care within primary care organisations. The aim is to investigate the ability of…

Abstract

The background is that clinical governance is a new mechanism for improving patient care within primary care organisations. The aim is to investigate the ability of practices in a single Primary Care Trust to improve influenza and pneumococcal vaccination uptake in high risk groups as a component of a clinical governance programme. A descriptive before and after study was undertaken at West Lincolnshire Primary Care Trust. Concludes that clinically, important improvements in influenza vaccination uptake occurred in patients over 65 years, and for influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in coronary heart disease and diabetic patients between the two audit cycles demonstrating the ability of participating practices to achieve and exceed national targets for influenza immunisation of these high‐risk groups.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

A. Keetanjaly, Suhaida Abdul Kadir, Wong Su Luan and Arnida Abdullah

The involvement of parents in schools and their contribution towards their children’s academic learning have been a focal point in educational research. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The involvement of parents in schools and their contribution towards their children’s academic learning have been a focal point in educational research. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that influence parental involvement in secondary schools and subsequently proposed a comprehensive parental involvement model.

Design/methodology/approach

Research articles, reports and dissertations on the factors that influence parental involvement were reviewed to obtain related empirical evidence for the development of a workable model.

Findings

A conceptual framework was proposed to understand the factors that influence parental involvement. The role of creativity in principals’ leadership practices and parental involvement in secondary schools were found to be related. Additionally, this relationship was found to be mediated by school practices and school climate.

Research limitations/implications

A framework on the factors that influence parental involvement guided by literature review and three main hypotheses for testing were proposed, which require further empirical assessment.

Practical implications

The school–parent partnership shares a common understanding of the educational needs and social development of the children. The school administrators, school community, stakeholders and related policymakers can effectively leverage the findings of this study in the effort to enhance parental involvement within the school context.

Originality/value

Only a handful of research-based studies probed into the factors that influence parental involvement in secondary schools within the Malaysian context. This study identified several significant factors that enhance parental involvement in secondary schools.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Judith Shamian, Linda O’Brien‐Pallas, Donna Thomson, Chris Alksnis and Michael Steven Kerr

States Canadian governments have, after a decade of health care downsizing, started to focus on issues of health human resources. Posits that nurses in particular…

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Abstract

States Canadian governments have, after a decade of health care downsizing, started to focus on issues of health human resources. Posits that nurses in particular experience higher rates of absenteeism and injury than other types of Canadian workers. Advocates that this study’s findings offers numerous ideas to managers of the system, unions, nurses, government and other parties on how to manage the system better for all involved and the improvement of the health care system.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2022

Dermot P. Coates and Conor Kelly

Since 2000, the value of aircraft assets imported to – and exported from – the Irish economy has increased significantly. In each case, these figures represent a marked…

Abstract

Since 2000, the value of aircraft assets imported to – and exported from – the Irish economy has increased significantly. In each case, these figures represent a marked rise over a 17-year period. This gives rise to some simple questions: what are the dynamics that give rise to a small, open economy's demand for aircraft assets on this scale? Indeed, is it merely a reflection of our island location or is there something more at play? And can we comment on the role of the air cargo industry in this demand? Ireland's growing aircraft leasing industry is internationally orientated with Ireland emerging as an important hub for this industry. A recent industry estimate noted that nine of the world's 10 largest aircraft leasing companies are located in Ireland with the number of aircraft managed in Ireland at 3,500 (or 50%) of the entire global fleet of leased aircraft. This, in part, is an important contributor to this demand for aircraft assets. The objective of this research is to examine the flow of imports and exports of aircrafts to, and through, Ireland using Eurostat's International Trade in Goods Statistics (ITGS) dataset. The authors also use the International Trade in Services series in the Balance of Payments in order to consider the value, and relative scale, of the services provided by air freight operators in order to provide some context to the role of the air cargo sector.

Details

The International Air Cargo Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-211-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Georgios I Zekos

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract…

Abstract

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract either under bills of lading drafted almost totally on the ship owners' terms or not to contract. The conflict between Britain and its rival the American merchant navy precipitated a movement for the use of model contracts of shipment (carriage) and towards standardisation of the liability of International liner carriers by legislative intervention. The bill of lading through its use in international trade gained the characteristic of being the document which incorporates the contractual terms. So, the orally agreed contract of carriage gave way to the contract of carriage in the form of a bill of lading.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Heather Yoeli, Sarah P. Lonbay, Sarah Morey and Lara Pizycki

The landscape of adult social care, and in particular of adult safeguarding, has shifted considerably over the last decade. Alongside policy changes in the responses to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The landscape of adult social care, and in particular of adult safeguarding, has shifted considerably over the last decade. Alongside policy changes in the responses to adult abuse, there have been shifts in professional and public understanding of what falls within the remit of this area of work. This results, arguably, in differing understandings of how adult safeguarding is constructed and understood. Given the increasing emphasis on multi-agency inter-professional collaboration, service user involvement and lay advocacy, it is important to consider and reflect on how both professionals and lay people understand this area of work. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed Augusto Boal’s model of Forum Theatre to explore how a variety of professional and lay groups understood, related to and engaged with how the Care Act 2014 defines and describes “adult safeguarding”.

Findings

Lay participants responded to the scenario in a variety of ways, upholding the construct validity of “adult safeguarding” and the authority of the social worker. Social care and health practitioners sought orderly, professionalised and sometimes ritualistic solutions to the “adult safeguarding” scenario presented, seeking carefully to structure and to manage lay involvement. Inter-professional collaboration was often problematic. The role of lay advocates was regarded ambiguously and ambivalently.

Originality/value

This paper offers a number of practice and research recommendations. Safeguarding practitioners could benefit from more effective and reflexive inter-professional collaboration. Both practitioners and service users could benefit from the more thoughtful deployment of the lay advocates encouraged within the Care Act 2014 and associated guidance.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

GEORGIOS ZEKOS

As early as 1818 in Marseilles merchants were asking the courts to recognise the legal character of the maritime sale of goods, which was a sale of a bill of lading…

Abstract

As early as 1818 in Marseilles merchants were asking the courts to recognise the legal character of the maritime sale of goods, which was a sale of a bill of lading representing goods at sea in a ship. The courts of Marseilles found suitable to hear and decide cases in accordance with the law merchant despite the lack of authority in the French Commercial Codes. Merchants everywhere began to deal with documents representing goods without waiting to check the goods as it was the practice under the Napoleonic Code. Thus, the transition of the bill of lading from a mere receipt to a negotiable instrument developed by the practice of merchants arranging the sale of goods in transit. The success of the use of bills of lading in international trade is attributable to its negotiable character and its feature as a document of title.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

1 – 10 of 149