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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Shannon Gordon

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the unique characteristics of Millennial librarians. These characteristics are related to larger issues having current…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the unique characteristics of Millennial librarians. These characteristics are related to larger issues having current and future relevance to Millennial librarians, colleagues of other generations, as well as library administration.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores training, leadership and work‐life balance in relation to Millennial librarians.

Findings

Certain defining characteristics of the Millennial generation need to be recognized and discussed by library administration and librarians of all generations.

Practical implications

Surveying the literature related to Millennial librarians' possible implications can assist in creating increased awareness of this group.

Originality/value

Much research focuses on engaging and teaching Millennials as library users. Infrequently discussed, however, is the concept of Millennials as librarians and the paper attempts to fill this gap.

Details

New Library World, vol. 111 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Anita Louise Hamilton, Jo Coldwell-Neilson and Annemieke Craig

Digital technology has changed how people interact with information and each other. Being able to access and share information ensures healthcare practitioners can keep

Abstract

Purpose

Digital technology has changed how people interact with information and each other. Being able to access and share information ensures healthcare practitioners can keep abreast of new and ever changing information and improve services. The purpose of this paper is to present an information management-knowledge transfer (IM-KT) framework which emerged from a study looking at digital literacy in the occupational therapy profession.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was undertaken in three stages. First an in-depth literature review was undertaken, which enabled the creation of an initial conceptual framework which in turn, informed the second stage of the research: the development of a survey about the use of digital technologies. Occupational therapy students, academics and practitioners across five different countries completed the survey, after which refinements to the framework were made. The IM-KT framework presented in this paper emerged as a result of the third stage of the study, which was completed using the Delphi technique where 18 experts were consulted over four rounds of qualitative questionnaires.

Findings

The IM-KT framework assists individuals and groups to better understand how information management and knowledge transfer occurs. The framework highlights the central role of information literacy and digital literacy and the influence of context on knowledge transfer activities.

Originality/value

The IM-KT framework delineates clearly between information and knowledge and demonstrates the essential role of information literacy and digital literacy in the knowledge era. This framework was developed for the occupational therapy profession and may be applicable to other professions striving to keep up to date with best evidence.

Details

VINE: The journal of information and knowledge management systems, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Ian Gibson, Lisa Goddard and Shannon Gordon

The purpose of this paper is to present how, in May 2008, the Ad Hoc Committee on Federated Search was formed to prepare a preliminary report on federated searching for a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present how, in May 2008, the Ad Hoc Committee on Federated Search was formed to prepare a preliminary report on federated searching for a special meeting of Librarians Academic Council at Memorial University Libraries. The primary purpose is to discuss current implementation of federated searching at this institution, explore what other institutions have done, examine federated search technologies, and offer recommendations for the future of this resource.

Design/methodology/approach

Information was drawn from a recent usability study, an informal survey was created, and a literature/technology review was conducted.

Findings

These four recommendations were proposed and unanimously accepted: actively develop the current federated search implementation by developing a web presence supporting “federated search in context”, re‐evaluating the need for consortial purchase of a federated search tool, continuing to assess the current federated search marketplace with an eye to choosing a next‐generation federated search tool that includes effective de‐duping, sorting, relevancy, clustering and faceting, and that the selection, testing, and implementation of such a tool should involve broad participation from the Memorial University Libraries system.

Originality/value

Provided is an inside look at one institution's experience with implementing a federated search tool. The paper should be of interest to anyone working in academic libraries, particularly the areas of administration, public services, and systems.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Janneka L. Guise, Janet Goosney, Shannon Gordon and Heather Pretty

The paper aims to describe a framework for a summer research/writing workshop for new university students, and its evolution over time and across institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe a framework for a summer research/writing workshop for new university students, and its evolution over time and across institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The University of Toronto at Scarborough (UTSC) has successfully offered its award‐winning two‐day Summer Learning Institute on Research, Writing and Presentation Skills for four years (2004‐2007), to increasing enrolments. Memorial University of Newfoundland (Memorial) adapted the UTSC model and successfully piloted its four‐day workshop, Summer Program in Academic Research and Communication (SPARC), in August 2006. Both programs were low‐cost, non‐credit summer workshops for new students to help them prepare for university‐level research and writing. Memorial offered its program a second time in August 2007. This paper focuses on the Memorial experience.

Findings

The success of these programs is attributed to a common framework used in each case: program planning, marketing, and delivery and assessment.

Practical implications

The framework described in this paper could be adapted by other institutions wishing to implement such a program. In addition, the SPARC team will continually improve the program by reflecting on each part of the framework.

Originality/value

Much research has been done to identify and address the specific needs of first‐year university students. For example, some institutions offer “first year experience” courses for credit, while others place first‐year students into Interest Groups. Most academic libraries offer information literacy sessions to groups of undergraduate students during the regular semester. This paper presents a model for reaching first year students before they take their first class at university.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Alissa Droog and Laura M. Bredahl

This paper aims to provide a case study of an ORCID promotion at the University of Waterloo School of Optometry and Vision Science, providing context for the importance of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a case study of an ORCID promotion at the University of Waterloo School of Optometry and Vision Science, providing context for the importance of education in ORCID outreach.

Design/methodology/approach

The three-month ORCID promotion used workshops and individual appointments to educate faculty about ORCID, identity management systems and research impact and scholarly communications.

Findings

A targeted and personal approach to ORCID promotion focused on education about why you might use this author disambiguation system resulted in 80% of the faculty within the School of Optometry and Vision Science signing up for, or using ORCID. Scaling an ORCID implementation to a larger group would likely benefit from a dedicated project group, and integration with existing institutional systems such as a requirement of an ORCID for internal grant applications.

Originality/value

Although time consuming, this small-scale ORCID promotion with one department reveals that a departmental approach to ORCID education may lead to larger conversations about scholarly communications and a stronger relationship between faculty and the library.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Tom Stonier

Future developments of computer systems will be handicapped not by the limitations of hardware, but by our lack of understanding of the human reasoning processes. The…

Abstract

Future developments of computer systems will be handicapped not by the limitations of hardware, but by our lack of understanding of the human reasoning processes. The development of three‐dimensional chips, cryogenic superconducting, or optical systems — and in due course, biological computers — presages the emergence of generations of super information processors whose power will dwarf the present generation of devices as they, in turn, have dwarfed the capacity of the computers of the pre‐transistor age. The effective application of such powerful future computers will be limited by the lack of an adequate theoretical basis for the processing of information. Gordon Scarrott has championed the need for a ‘science of information’ which should investigate the ‘natural properties of information such as function, structure, dynamic behaviour and statistical features…’ Such an effort should ‘… lead to a conceptual framework to guide systems design.’

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

THE popular image of Ireland is of a land where one can enjoy the perfect holiday. If you are a golfer, fisherman, rambler or if you just enjoy good food and of course the…

Abstract

THE popular image of Ireland is of a land where one can enjoy the perfect holiday. If you are a golfer, fisherman, rambler or if you just enjoy good food and of course the black nectar for which it is famous, then Ireland is the place to go, take the word of TV Chef, Keith Floyd. Ireland however, unlike many small countries, is not content to base its economy on tourism.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 65 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Guy Jumarie

The problem of expanding a meaningful entropic theory for fuzzy information cannot be thought of as being a mere (more or less formal) extension of Shannon theory. By…

Abstract

The problem of expanding a meaningful entropic theory for fuzzy information cannot be thought of as being a mere (more or less formal) extension of Shannon theory. By using the information theory of deterministic functions, the present author had already obtained some results in this way, and he herein continues this approach. After a short background on the different entropies of deterministic functions and on membership entropy of fuzzy sets, successively mixed entropy of fuzzy sets, joint membership functions of independent fuzzy sets, and conditional entropy of fuzzy sets with respect to other fuzzy sets are considered; the problem of defining transinformation between fuzzy sets, as a generalisation of the well known Shannon concept, is then examined. One of the conclusions of the article is that it is possible to build up a meaningful information theory of fuzzy sets by using the entropy of deterministic functions.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Nick Green

Recalls times spent in Gordon Pask’s company and the discussions with the author on a wide range of topics, but focusing especially on foundational issues in science and…

Abstract

Recalls times spent in Gordon Pask’s company and the discussions with the author on a wide range of topics, but focusing especially on foundational issues in science and cybernetics and developments in Pask’s own conversation theory and interaction of actors theory.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Guy Jumarie

A definition of entropy of maps which does not involve probability, but nevertheless is fully consistent with Shannon entropy can be derived using the informational…

Abstract

A definition of entropy of maps which does not involve probability, but nevertheless is fully consistent with Shannon entropy can be derived using the informational equation H(X,Y) = H(X) + H(Y,X). This approach has been extended in order to obtain the “Shannon entropy” of distributed maps. The model that is obtained involves two parameters which characterise the scanning procedures normally used by the cortex in human vision. The results are then used to re‐define the entropy of a fuzzy set and to extract the value of a membership from a small sample of observed data. The measure of entropic distance between patterns without using probability is also considered.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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