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Case study
Publication date: 1 October 2011

Rajagopal Shambavi and Sitalakshmi Ramanan

Marketing Communication.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing Communication.

Study level/applicability

At the undergraduate level, this case can be used in marketing courses such as Marketing Fundamentals, Marketing Management, Marketing Communication and Consumer Behavior. This case may also be used for Master's level students for Quality when focusing on safety/security in offices and factories.

Case overview

This case is used to introduce the concept of B2B and B2C marketing and explore the possibilities of converting an industry that essentially uses B2B marketing communication to choose B2C options. This case is also important for creating awareness on safety and preventive measures in the face of a fire crisis.

Expected learning outcomes

Understanding the role of marketing communication. Differentiating between B2B and B2C markets. Exploring the application of B2C marketing communication in the fire suppression systems market in the Middle East.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Shambavi Rajagopal and Ipshita Bansal

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate consumers’ latent need to serve society by participating in “Go Green Revolution” and the contribution to proper disposal of waste…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate consumers’ latent need to serve society by participating in “Go Green Revolution” and the contribution to proper disposal of waste and packaging of fruits and vegetables by the consumer and retailer.

Design/methodology/approach

The United Arab Emirates (UAE’s) regular customers comprise an expatriate population of 200 nationalities. Primary research attempted to maintain a ratio of this diversity.

Findings

There is low awareness of effects of disposal of fruits and vegetables and an urgent need for intervention by stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This research attempts to provide avenues for further scientific and academic research. Better methods of disposing and faster turnaround from waste to compost should be pursued scientifically. Academic research venues are available for researchers to study methodologies which can be used to educate people. Corporate, institutional and government awareness campaigns specific to disposal of fruits and vegetables should be researched further.

Practical implications

The paper attempts to analyse the levels of awareness of the general population with respect to disposal of fruits and vegetables. The landfills can be saved from the stench which usually encompasses the area, if fruits and vegetables can be disposed properly. The creation of compost at micro levels can help create a greener earth.

Originality/value

The research paper focuses on awareness of disposal of fruits and vegetables and its packaging, which is new in the context of the UAE.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Shambavi Rajagopal, Sitalakshmi Ramanan, Ramanan Visvanathan and Subhadra Satapathy

The purpose of this paper is to introduce Halal certification as a new marketing paradigm which marketers can use to differentiate their products and services in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce Halal certification as a new marketing paradigm which marketers can use to differentiate their products and services in the current competitive environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 151 questionnaires were distributed to the business student population from different universities in United Arab Emirates (UAE). The self‐administered questionnaire required the respondents to answer demographics questions on emirate of residence within UAE, gender, age and nationality, followed by specific questions to determine if respondents actively seek Halal certification for various products and services and if they were aware of brands offering certification. The questionnaire concluded with an open‐ended question to find out what Halal certification meant to the respondent.

Findings

The application of statistical tools indicated that, although the concept of Halal is familiar to the students, their awareness of whether products are Halal certified and their knowledge about Halal brands is extremely low.

Practical implications

This paper suggests a model for marketers to brand their products and services by seeking, highlighting and communicating Halal certification in the UAE and possibly extending to the world markets.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that consumers are not exposed enough to Halal certification and Halal brands through marketing communication and suggests the greater use of marketing and branding to promote and sell Halal products and services. It has immediate practical relevance to marketing practitioners and strategic planners.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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