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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Amy Nicole Baker, David King, Michael Nalick, Melissa Tempio, Vishal K. Gupta and Charles A. Pierce

The goal of this study is to examine the association between managers' sexually-oriented behavior in publicly traded firms and subsequent stock market reactions. Both…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to examine the association between managers' sexually-oriented behavior in publicly traded firms and subsequent stock market reactions. Both sexual harassment and nonharassing sexually-oriented behavior (i.e. workplace romance) are associated with negative shareholder reactions. The authors also examine factors that may alter the stock market reaction and those that may reduce the risk of lawsuit in sexual harassment cases.

Design/methodology/approach

Information about incidents of sexually-oriented behavior was collected from media reports and content coded. An event study with a stock market reaction was used to measure the impact of disclosed sexually-oriented behaviors. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between incident characteristics and sexual harassment lawsuits.

Findings

Disclosure of managers' sexually-oriented behavior is associated with a negative stock market reaction. Interestingly, the reaction was not more severe for sexual harassment disclosures compared to nonharassing behavior (i.e. workplace romance). Results also suggest that terminating a manager prior to disclosure of an event is negatively related to a harassment lawsuit.

Originality/value

The authors report this as the first study to focus on the stock market reaction of sexually-oriented harassing and nonharassing behavior of managers. This work complements research that documents the negative impact of sexual harassment on individuals by demonstrating these behaviors are associated with loss and risk at an organizational level.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Amy Nicole Baker

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the antecedents and consequences of non-harassing sexual behavior in the workplace. Individual perceptions of climate were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the antecedents and consequences of non-harassing sexual behavior in the workplace. Individual perceptions of climate were examined as antecedents; physical strain and turnover intentions were studied as consequences of non-harassing sexual behavior at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were administered to two samples of working adults. In the second sample, criterion measures were collected four months after the predictors.

Findings

Innovative and traditional climates were associated with workplace sexual behavior; sexual behavior was positively associated with physical strain and turnover intentions, both concurrently and four months later.

Research limitations/implications

Climate was not assessed at the group level of analysis; only individual perceptions of workplace climate were measured. The research design was not longitudinal, thus causal conclusions cannot be drawn. Despite these limitations, the results suggest that perceptions of climate are related to sexual behaviors in the workplace. Further, the findings highlight negative outcomes associated with observing even non-harassing sexual behavior at work.

Practical implications

Managers may consider implementing specific guidelines around non-harassing sexual behavior in the workplace. Organizational leaders may have the ability to affect how non-harassing sexual behavior is interpreted, based on the kinds of climates they create in their organizations.

Originality/value

This is the first study that assesses both the antecedents and consequences of non-harassing sexual behavior. It expands the literature by including psychological perceptions of the workplace as predictors of sexual behavior at work.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Ismail Yahaya, Antonio Ponce De Leon, Olalekan A. Uthman, Joaquim J. F. Soares and Gloria Macassa

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between child sexual abuse and sexual risk behaviours as well as its potential mediators.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between child sexual abuse and sexual risk behaviours as well as its potential mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study used data from a cross-sectional study from 12,800 women between 15 and 49 years of age included in the 2008 Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was applied to assess the association between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and sexual risk behaviours.

Findings

The authors found that CSA was directly associated with sexual risk behaviours. In addition, the association between CSA and sexual risk behaviour was also partially mediated by alcohol and cigarette use.

Research limitations/implications

The results show that being abused in childhood is important for the subsequent development of sexual risk behaviours in adulthood and the association is mediated by alcohol and cigarette use.

Practical implications

The results may be helpful for policy makers and health care planners in designing cultural sensitive public health intervention that will reduce the burden of CSA, its long-term effects (sexual risk behaviours) and intervening mediators that increase the risks.

Social implications

These findings suggest that to reduce sexual risks, interventions to address sexual abuse needs to include other social problems (smoking, alcohol) that victims result to when faced with trauma.

Originality/value

The current study is the only one so far in sub-Saharan Africa to have explored the relation between CSA and sexual risk behaviours using SEM.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Camila Fernandes, Cassandra Berbary, Cory A. Crane and Caroline J. Easton

The purpose of this paper is to assess the rates of HIV risk-taking behavior and sexual violence among clients with co-occurring addiction and intimate partner violence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the rates of HIV risk-taking behavior and sexual violence among clients with co-occurring addiction and intimate partner violence (IPV). The current study also aims to determine whether HIV risk-taking behaviors (e.g. trading sex for money or drugs, having unprotected sex with multiple partners) differ among substance using IPV offenders with and without a history of sexual aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary analyses were conducted from Easton et al.’s (2017) randomized controlled trial of substance use domestic violence treatment among substance using IPV offenders. Correlational analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between pre-treatment sexual aggression, HIV risk-taking behaviors, substance use and aggression. Analyses of covariance were conducted in order to determine differences in participants’ HIV risk-taking behaviors based on their history of sexual aggression while controlling for hours of contact with the female partners.

Findings

In a sample of 63 participants, males with higher rates of sexual aggression were more likely to engage in sexual risk-taking behaviors. This study encountered a correlation between pre-treatment risk-taking behavior and verbal and physical aggression, as well as a correlation between pre-treatment risk-taking behaviors and cocaine use. Results neither suggest a relationship between sexual aggression and alcohol use nor HIV risk-taking behaviors and alcohol use at pre-treatment.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is limited by sample size and power.

Originality/value

This study is among the first of its kind to investigate HIV risk-taking behaviors among substance using offenders of IPV. This study provides support for the inclusion of treatment targeting HIV risk-taking behaviors among IPV offenders.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Ronald J. Burke and Carol A. McKeen

Reports on a study which examined the incidence, antecedents andconsequences of social‐sexual behaviours at work. These include anynon‐work related behaviour having a…

Abstract

Reports on a study which examined the incidence, antecedents and consequences of social‐sexual behaviours at work. These include any non‐work related behaviour having a sexual component, such as harassment, flirting, posters and pin‐ups, and sexual jokes. Data were collected from 267 Canadian managerial and professional women using questionnaires completed anonymously. Women experiencing more harassing and non‐harassing social‐sexual behaviours at work were less satisfied and less committed to their organizations and reported poorer emotional wellbeing. Few demographic characteristics were related to social‐sexual behaviours experienced. Work environment characteristics, however, were more strongly related to experienced social‐sexual behaviours at work. Managerial and professional women reported experiencing harassing and non‐harassing social‐sexual behaviours with the same frequency as working women in general.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Wanthanee Limpaphayom, Robert J. Williams and Paul A. Fadil

This study seeks to examine differences in the perceptions of sexual harassment between business school students in the USA and Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine differences in the perceptions of sexual harassment between business school students in the USA and Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

Senior‐level business students from both the USA (228 students) and Thailand (260 students) were surveyed regarding their perceptions of what constituted sexual harassment behaviour. After reading different workplace scenarios, the participants used a Likert‐type scale to rank different behaviours as to what they felt constituted sexual harassment. The survey scores were factor‐analyzed in order to determine the constructs underlying the variety of sexual harassment behaviours.

Findings

Students in the USA viewed sexual harassment as involving a quid quo pro situation in which one's behaviour affects the terms of employment (sexual coercion), and a hostile environment in which certain behaviours and remarks create a hostile or offensive work environment. In comparison, the Thai students also viewed behaviours that create a hostile or offensive environment as constituting harassment, but also considered sexually explicit language and jokes to be very offensive, and as constituting a form of sexual coercion.

Research limitations/implications

This study used only one data collection method, specifically, a survey instrument. Also, this study examined differences between US subjects and subjects from only one Far Eastern country. Thus, the results may not be generalizable to other East Asian countries.

Practical implications

As US businesses begin to expand into the Far East, it is imperative that we understand the nature of sexual harassment perceptions in these Far East countries.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence that the perception of what constitutes sexual harassment varies across cultures.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Ann Jirapongsuwan, Sithu Swe and Arpaporn Powwattana

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the intention to prevent sexual risk behaviors and associated factors among the youth in Yangon, Myanmar.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the intention to prevent sexual risk behaviors and associated factors among the youth in Yangon, Myanmar.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional descriptive research was undertaken among 192 youths. Participants included the youth residing in the study area and participated in the youth development program. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were applied to identify an association.

Findings

The findings indicated that the proportion of a high level of intention to prevent sexual risk behaviors was 53.6%. The factors associated with the intention to prevent sexual risk behaviors were: belief strength on sexual risk behaviors (aOR = 2.84; 95% CI: 1.06–7.26), normative belief on the prevention of sexual risk behaviors (aOR = 2.03; 95% CI: 3.03–6.23), motivation to comply with preventing sexual risk behaviors (aOR = 4.72; 95% CI: 3.11–6.23), decision-making (aOR = 2.46; 95% CI: 2.22–5.41) and negotiation (aOR = 6.3; 95% CI: 2.37–10.23)

Research limitations/implications

The study was a cross-sectional study and cannot establish causal relationships. These results can be a guideline for implementation for the youth but may limit the generalization of results to other age groups in Myanmar.

Practical implications

Findings can be used as a local and national public health guideline for developing interventions to prevent sexual risk behaviors.

Originality/value

Sexual risk behavior is considered taboo and puts Myanmar youths at risk of health and social problems. It is important for prevention efforts to determine factors related to sexual intentions to prevent the consequence of these problems.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Cheryl Somers, Emily Avendt and Amber Sepsey

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the content and approach of parent-adolescent communication about sexuality were associated with three adolescent sexuality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the content and approach of parent-adolescent communication about sexuality were associated with three adolescent sexuality variables (sexual attitudes, combination of all behaviors and advanced behaviors).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research with adolescents was conducted in classrooms at school. Participants were 473 adolescents (196 males, 253 females and 24 unreported) in grades 9–12 from two high schools (one urban and one suburban) in a large midwestern city.

Findings

Adolescents who described their parents’ communication approach as open, or who did not engage in conversations about sexuality with their parents reported lower rates of sexual behavior, when compared to adolescents whose parents dictated such conversations. Females were found to have more conservative sexual attitudes than males, and both mothers and fathers were found to have a direct role in talking to their children about sexuality.

Originality/value

Findings from the study may offer guidance to parents and help adults aiming to empower youth to make healthy sexual decisions.

Details

Health Education, vol. 119 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Amy Nicole Salvaggio, Jennifer Hopper and Kathryn M. Packell

The goal of the present research is to investigate the association between observing consensual sexual behavior at work (e.g. flirting, joking) and job outcomes …

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of the present research is to investigate the association between observing consensual sexual behavior at work (e.g. flirting, joking) and job outcomes – specifically, job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were administered about observed consensual sexual behavior and job attitudes in two separate studies of working adults. Participants in Study 1 were 113 workers from 33 workplaces in the Midwestern USA; participants in Study 2 were 242 adults working in a variety of industries.

Findings

In support of the hypotheses, results from Study 1 indicated that employees who observed more sexual behavior at work reported lower job satisfaction. Study 2 replicated this result, but only for female employees. Observed sexual behavior at work was positively related to turnover intentions for both genders.

Research limitations/implications

In both studies, the research design was cross‐sectional, which prohibits causal inferences about the data. Second, it was not possible to assess whether the observed sexual behavior occurred between friendly peers, married coworkers, or coworkers married to other people – thus it is unclear how this factor is related to employee reactions.

Practical implications

Human resource managers should consider formulating policies regarding consensual sexual behavior at work to guide managers in handling potentially difficult situations, such as romantic relationships between peers.

Originality/value

This research is the first to explicitly link consensual sexual behavior at work with two specific job attitudes: job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Williams Ezinwa Nwagwu

The purpose of this study was to examine how the identity of undergraduates who use social networking sites in selected Nigerian universities influences the prediction of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine how the identity of undergraduates who use social networking sites in selected Nigerian universities influences the prediction of their sexual behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was used to collect data from 388 students from three public universities in Nigeria.

Findings

Sex and age exerted sufficient influence on the youth’s sexual behaviour, but the identity variables seemed only to increase the tendency of younger males to form intimate relationship with partners. Specifically, young males who maintain high level of social relationships have a high tendency of developing intimate relationship with partners.

Research limitations/implications

This study that deployed identity variables provides wide-ranging information on how identity moderates sexual behaviour in the presence of traditional predictors of demographic characteristics and social networking.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that identity has a very strong influence of the predictive power of sex and age on sexual behaviour.

Originality/value

This study is the first that examined sexual behaviour, identity and social networking together.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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