Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Camila Fernandes, Cassandra Berbary, Cory A. Crane and Caroline J. Easton

The purpose of this paper is to assess the rates of HIV risk-taking behavior and sexual violence among clients with co-occurring addiction and intimate partner violence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the rates of HIV risk-taking behavior and sexual violence among clients with co-occurring addiction and intimate partner violence (IPV). The current study also aims to determine whether HIV risk-taking behaviors (e.g. trading sex for money or drugs, having unprotected sex with multiple partners) differ among substance using IPV offenders with and without a history of sexual aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary analyses were conducted from Easton et al.’s (2017) randomized controlled trial of substance use domestic violence treatment among substance using IPV offenders. Correlational analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between pre-treatment sexual aggression, HIV risk-taking behaviors, substance use and aggression. Analyses of covariance were conducted in order to determine differences in participants’ HIV risk-taking behaviors based on their history of sexual aggression while controlling for hours of contact with the female partners.

Findings

In a sample of 63 participants, males with higher rates of sexual aggression were more likely to engage in sexual risk-taking behaviors. This study encountered a correlation between pre-treatment risk-taking behavior and verbal and physical aggression, as well as a correlation between pre-treatment risk-taking behaviors and cocaine use. Results neither suggest a relationship between sexual aggression and alcohol use nor HIV risk-taking behaviors and alcohol use at pre-treatment.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is limited by sample size and power.

Originality/value

This study is among the first of its kind to investigate HIV risk-taking behaviors among substance using offenders of IPV. This study provides support for the inclusion of treatment targeting HIV risk-taking behaviors among IPV offenders.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 September 2017

Leana Bouffard and Amanda Goodson

Definitions of rape and sexual aggression have varied widely in the research literature, resulting in a wide range of estimates for perpetration and remaining questions as…

Abstract

Purpose

Definitions of rape and sexual aggression have varied widely in the research literature, resulting in a wide range of estimates for perpetration and remaining questions as to the factors that may affect involvement in sexual violence. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study uses a sample of college men to assess multiple forms of measurement of sexual aggression and theoretical predictors.

Findings

Findings indicate that the different measures of sexual aggression (broad vs narrow; hypothetical vs behavioral) are significantly correlated with each other. Additionally, many theoretical predictors (rape myths, low self-control, sexual entitlement, and pornography use) are consistently related to all measurement forms. However, some variables (masculinity, peer support for violence against women, sexual partners, and alcohol and drug use) are only related to broad measures of sexual aggression, and some are related only to hypothetical (i.e. certainty of apprehension) or behavioral measures (i.e. fraternity membership).

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen approach, the results may lack generalizability. Findings do, however, point to important considerations in defining sexual aggression moving forward.

Practical implications

Results point to the importance of aiming policy and programs at the particular characteristics that most consistently impact sexual aggression.

Originality/value

This paper addresses lingering questions about the impact of differences in definition and measurement on understanding sexual aggression.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Antonio Eugenio Zacarias, Gloria Macassa and Joaquim J.F. Soares

The purpose of this study is to examine the occurrence, severity, chronicity, and predictors of inflicted IPV among women visiting the Forensic Services in Maputo city…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the occurrence, severity, chronicity, and predictors of inflicted IPV among women visiting the Forensic Services in Maputo city (Mozambique) as victims of IPV by their partner.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was cross‐sectional: the data were collected from 1,442 women over 12 months (consecutive cases) and were analysed with bivariate and multivariate methods.

Findings

The overall occurrence of inflicted IPV across severity (one or more types) was 69.4 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 44.8±65.8). Psychological aggression was reported by 64 percent of women (chronicity, mean/SD 23.1±32.4); physical assault by 38.2 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 10.3±24.6); sexual coercion by 39.1 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 7.2±16.2); and injuries by 22.6 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 4.2±12.4). Further, 14.5 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 140.2±86.3) of the women used all abuse types against their partners: 18.2 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 113.1±75.9) injury, and psychological and physical abuse; 14.7 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 64.9±64.3) injury, and physical and sexual abuse; 16.3 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 94.1±57.2) injury, and psychological and sexual abuse; and 24.9 percent (chronicity, mean/SD 99.5±72) psychological, physical, and sexual abuse. Controlling behaviours, co‐occurring perpetration, abuse as a child, and certain types of own victimization were the more important factors associated with the inflicted abuse.

Research limitations/implications

More research into women's experiences of IPV as perpetrators, particularly in relation to co‐occurring inflicted abuse, control, and abuse as a child, is warranted in Sub‐Saharan Africa. An important limitation here is the lack of a control group (e.g. general population).

Practical implications

The present findings may be useful for the development of strategies to prevent/treat IPV in Mozambique.

Originality/value

In spite of its limitations, the current study may have provided new insights into women's use of violence against their partners.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 February 2018

Daniel Mark Carter, Roxanne Khan and Gayle Brewer

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the sexual aggression in sport literature, including an analysis of interventions delivered to athletes that focus…

Downloads
964

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the sexual aggression in sport literature, including an analysis of interventions delivered to athletes that focus on the role of the coach and wider sporting community. The paper will also discuss the limitations of applying such prevention methods and possible directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of research investigating the prevalence of sexually aggressive behaviour perpetrated by athletes, theoretical explanations of their sexual misconduct, and the application of violence prevention methods delivered to athletes.

Findings

Research findings are discussed in relation to the prevalence of sexual aggression in sport and the efficacy of prevention methods.

Originality/value

This is a viewpoint piece on sexual aggression in sport.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Ada L. Sinacore and Barbara A. Morningstar

The aim of this chapter is to apply a Feminist Social Constructionist (FSC) epistemological stance to the analysis of the literature on sexual harassment and aggression in…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to apply a Feminist Social Constructionist (FSC) epistemological stance to the analysis of the literature on sexual harassment and aggression in the workplace. Research demonstrates that institutions and their policies are ineffective in addressing sexual harassment and that, for the most part, perpetrators are not sanctioned. This chapter deconstructs the ways in which Canadian policies and systemic variables serve to silence victims of workplace abuse and, consequently, protect perpetrators. To this end, we review the definition, legislation and policies related to sexual harassment. Next, factors that lead to risk, reporting and silencing are assessed. As well, organizational responses are analysed to identify institutional factors that result in creating environments that serve to perpetuate sexism, and the resulting victimization of workers with little to no change in the number of perpetrators being implicated.

Details

Global Currents in Gender and Feminisms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-484-2

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Samantha Keene

Mainstream pornography is popular, freely accessible, and infused with themes of male dominance, aggression, and female subservience. Through depicting sex in these ways…

Abstract

Mainstream pornography is popular, freely accessible, and infused with themes of male dominance, aggression, and female subservience. Through depicting sex in these ways, mainstream pornography has the potential to influence the further development of harmful sexual scripts that condone or endorse violence against women and girls. These concerns warrant the adoption of a harms-based perspective in critical examinations of pornography's influence on sexual experiences. This chapter reports on findings from interviews with 24 heterosexual emerging adults living in Aotearoa/New Zealand about how pornography has impacted their lives. Despite a shared awareness among participants of mainstream pornography's misogynistic tendencies, and the potential for harm from those displays, men's and women's experiences were profoundly gendered. Men's reported experiences were often associated with concerns about their own sexual behaviors, performances, and/or abilities. Conversely, women's experiences were often shaped by how pornography had affected the way that men related to them sexually. Their experiences included instances of sexual coercion and assault which were not reported by the men. These findings signal the need for a gendered lens, situated within a broader harms-based perspective, in examinations of pornography's influence.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

David Joubert

The idea that criminal behavior is a function of the offender's personality, also called the Homology hypothesis, has a long history in forensic psychology and…

Abstract

Purpose

The idea that criminal behavior is a function of the offender's personality, also called the Homology hypothesis, has a long history in forensic psychology and criminology. This assumption, however, has been decried as lacking empirical support. In spite of much social concern relative to sexual offenses, there is virtually no research looking at the stability of offending pattern in sex offenders of adult women. This paper aims to fill some of the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

Latent structure analyses were conducted on a secondary dataset including 145 serial rapists. A cross‐sectional, discrete time‐series design was used including a sequence of three offenses.

Findings

Moderate support was found for the three main assumptions underlying the Homology hypothesis. Offenses tended to share a relatively similar underlying structure, with the victimology and aggression components being more prominent than the sexual dimension. The three primary profiles identified, labeled “Passive”, “Stranger‐aggressive”, and “Antisocial”, were found to be about 50 percent stable across the sequence. Finally, the presence of significant dysfunction in the family of origin predicted membership in the “Antisocial” class, as well as increased the specificity and stability of this profile. The presence of early maladjustment was not related to any of the states.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the results, it is proposed that future research incorporates contextual‐environmental elements in order to increase the validity of the findings.

Originality/value

This study represents a unique attempt at documenting patterns of stability and variations across incidents of rape, using an institutional sample. Furthermore, it illustrates the use and potential benefits of latent structure models in criminological research.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Thomas Nally, Jane L. Ireland, Kimberley McNeill, Philip Birch and Carol A. Ireland

The purpose of this paper is to explore non-violent pornography within secure hospital settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore non-violent pornography within secure hospital settings.

Design/methodology/approach

It includes a systematic review (n = 40 papers), followed by a qualitative study comprising semi-structured interviews (n = 24, 6 patients and 18 staff) and staff focus groups (n = 22 staff).

Findings

The systematic review identified six themes, as follows: pornography is inconsistently defined, pornography exposure can increase general aggression, pornography exposure may increase the risk for sexual aggression, pornography exposure can increase aggression supportive beliefs, pornography exposure impacts negatively on those with a violent predisposition and pornography is educational for men not identifying as heterosexual. The semi-structured interviews and focus groups revealed four themes as follows: staff members hold diverse beliefs about pornographic material, pornography is difficult to obtain and use for patients who do not identify as heterosexual, pornography is used for specific functions, and frequent exposure to pornography can have negative effects for staff members.

Practical implications

Trying to obtain consensus on the impacts of pornography on forensic patients is not possible; material access decisions should be on a case-by-case basis. Policy decisions should be based on fully represented views, including the LGBTI community. The impacts on staff of their occupational exposure to such material should be recognised and support provided. Clinical decision-making in this area should consider not only if access should be allowed but also how it can be managed safely, if at all. This includes for all those who could be exposed to such material, inadvertently or otherwise.

Originality/value

It addresses the under-researched area of patient access to pornography, capturing a poorly considered sample, namely, high secure psychiatric.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2013

Johan M.G. van der Dennen

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great Apes.

Design/methodology/approach – Biopolitics in this chapter means evolutionarily informed political science, with emphasis on power relations. I review the literature on intrasexual and intersexual dominance interactions among individuals and competitive and/or agonistic interactions among groups in the Great Apes (Hominidae, formerly Pongidae): orangutan (Pongo with two species and three subspecies), gorilla (Gorilla with four subspecies), bonobo (Pan paniscus), and common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes with four subspecies). In the final section I present some (speculative) thoughts on Pan prior or the modern human ancestor.

Findings – Not only Man is a political animal.

Originality/value – Impartial, objective, and as complete as possible review of the literature for the students of (comparative) politics, ethology, and psychology.

Details

The world of biology and politics: Organization and research areas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-728-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Bryanna Fox

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of a comprehensive set of covariates to distinguish and predict juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) from non-sexual juvenile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of a comprehensive set of covariates to distinguish and predict juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) from non-sexual juvenile offenders (NSJOs) using demographic traits, criminality covariates, childhood trauma, and psychopathologies in a sample of male and female juvenile offenders in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A multivariate binary logistic regression will be conducted on a total of 64,329 juvenile offenders in Florida to determine what demographic, criminal history, childhood traumas, and psychopathologies make a difference in identifying sexual and NSJOs while controlling for the other key predictors in the model.

Findings

Results indicate that having an earlier age of criminal onset and more felony arrests, experiencing sexual abuse or being male, having low empathy, high impulsivity, depression, and psychosis all significantly increase the risk of sexual vs non-sexual offending among the male and female juvenile offenders, even while controlling for all other key covariates in the analysis.

Originality/value

This study uncovered many new findings regarding the key distinguishing traits of juvenile sex offending vs non-sexual offending, using a comprehensive list of predictors, a large sample of male and female offenders, and a rigorous statistical methodology.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000