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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Joshua Aston, Jun Wen, Edmund Goh and Oswin Maurer

This cutting-edge short commentary is intended to raise awareness of sex trafficking in the tourism and hospitality industry. The purpose of this paper is to also advocate…

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Abstract

Purpose

This cutting-edge short commentary is intended to raise awareness of sex trafficking in the tourism and hospitality industry. The purpose of this paper is to also advocate for further research to identify and hopefully prevent sex trafficking in related settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a descriptive overview of the current knowledge base on sex trafficking in tourism and hospitality. Based on gaps in the literature, future research agendas and directions are suggested.

Findings

Academic research on sex trafficking in tourism and hospitality remains limited. More scholarly attention is needed to this matter. The tourism industry is directly and indirectly associated with sex trafficking (e.g. hotel accommodations and direct consumption of sexual services, such as through sex tourism). Despite legislative efforts by international government agencies to eradicate sex trafficking, the problem remains pervasive. Broader practice- and research-based intervention efforts are needed.

Originality/value

This short commentary advocates for tourism and hospitality researchers to make practical and theoretical industry contributions that may help prevent sex trafficking.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Anastacia Ryan

This chapter explores sex work and compares legal regimes in two case study contexts of Scotland and New Zealand. It highlights parallels in policy norms and approaches…

Abstract

This chapter explores sex work and compares legal regimes in two case study contexts of Scotland and New Zealand. It highlights parallels in policy norms and approaches towards women in sex work and women who use drugs, including stigmatisation and punishment of ‘deviant’ women or alternatively, approaches that seek to ‘rescue’ women and which frames them as victims. Different policy approaches and regulatory regimes are discussed but the chapter argues that without attention to social justice issues, the structural drivers of women’s engagement in sex work will continue to be overlooked. Participation in policy processes by those with lived experience is emphasised, both to ensure better understanding of sex work by policymakers, and also in recognition of the citizenship, voice and agency of sex workers.

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The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Naomi Kunstler and Jack Tsai

This paper aims to understand landlords’ attitudes toward applicants with histories of sex offenses and landlords’ willingness to broaden eligibility criteria for tenancy.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand landlords’ attitudes toward applicants with histories of sex offenses and landlords’ willingness to broaden eligibility criteria for tenancy.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 50 landlords in Connecticut were interviewed. The content of interviews was analyzed to examine how often a landlord would be open to renting to individuals on the sex offender registry and what conditions affect their decisions.

Findings

In total, 44% of landlords would not rent to adults with histories of sex offenses under any circumstance, but 8% of landlords reported they would rent to such individuals and an additional 36% of landlords were open to it with a high threshold for other indicators of good tenancy such as stable housing history, good credit and timely rental payments.

Practical implications

These findings not only illustrate the real-world challenges in finding housing for adults with histories of sex offenses but also highlight opportunities in working with landlords.

Originality/value

There has been little examination of housing adults with sex offenders from the perspective of landlords, which is important to understand to address this difficult and sensitive issue.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Da vid Opoku and Brian H. Kleiner

Abuse of power and position for control and personal gain can occur in the professional‐client relationship, and has been recognised since ancient times, as documented by…

Abstract

Abuse of power and position for control and personal gain can occur in the professional‐client relationship, and has been recognised since ancient times, as documented by warnings, admonitions, and code of conduct that can be found in virtually all major cultures and professional traditions. Professional sexual misconduct and offences are emerg ing from secrecy, as compelling issues that threaten public welfare and safety and jeopardise trust in the important relationships between professionals and pa tients. For the purpose of this discussion, professional sexual misconduct can be defined as the overt or convert expression of erotic or romantic thoughts, feelings, or gestures toward the client that are sexual or may be reasonably construed by the client as sexual.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Jane Scoular, Jane Pitcher, Rosie Campbell, Phil Hubbard and Maggie O'Neill

This article considers the likely success of recent reforms of prostitution policy by reflecting on a recent Joseph Rowntree Foundation‐funded study that examined the…

Abstract

This article considers the likely success of recent reforms of prostitution policy by reflecting on a recent Joseph Rowntree Foundation‐funded study that examined the experiences of those living and working in areas of street sex work. This empirical work points to some of the dangers of policy frameworks and techniques of control that continue to situate sex work as antithetical to the cultivation of community safety.

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Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Justin Gaffney

The recently published Home Office strategy document, A co‐ordinated prostitution strategy and a summary of responses to Paying the price (Home Office, 2006), focuses on…

Abstract

The recently published Home Office strategy document, A co‐ordinated prostitution strategy and a summary of responses to Paying the price (Home Office, 2006), focuses on the role of men in prostitution. However, this focus is centred on men being the abusers of women and children involved in the sex industry, and vilifies men as the perpetrators that drive the sex market. This article traces the implications of the strategy for men involved in prostitution.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Charquinta J. Mims and Brian H. Kleiner

Looks at the issue of homosexual harassment in the workplace. Defines sexual harassment according to the (US) Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines. Provides…

Abstract

Looks at the issue of homosexual harassment in the workplace. Defines sexual harassment according to the (US) Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines. Provides some background history of traditional sexual harassment in the workplace, extending this, in the 1990s, to also encompass homosexual harassment. Describes what is meant by “quid pro quo” and “hostile working environment” harassment, providing examples of what would constitute unacceptable behaviour. Reports on the findings of some surveys of homosexual harassment in the workplace. Offers some helpful tips for employers to follow to prevent and/or protect against homosexual harassment occurring within their organization.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

David Pearson

This paper focuses on the production of school sex education policies. At the start of the decade, two moral panics – about high teenage pregnancy rates and AIDS/HIV …

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1533

Abstract

This paper focuses on the production of school sex education policies. At the start of the decade, two moral panics – about high teenage pregnancy rates and AIDS/HIV – coloured UK Government policy formation. The legislative response put control of sex education into the hands of governing bodies of individual schools. As a result, policies vary widely in quality, presenting local education authorities with a monitoring problem even before policy is put into practice. In 1995, Avon Local Education Authority published a document to help schools develop their sex education policies. In 1997, a project to look at the sex education policies of schools in Bristol began, developing a set of criteria to measure their quality. It found that the quality varied from good to superficial, and that the policies held by most secondary schools in Bristol had serious deficiencies. The main problems with the policies included both specific and general issues. Many either failed to address the topics of sexuality and abortion at all, or addressed them only superficially, despite explicit advice from the local education authority that these topics should be covered by schools’ policies. Many did not make it clear that parents have the right to withdraw their child from sex education, nor did they say what would happen to pupils who are withdrawn. Few schools made their commitment to staff training explicit. Most policies failed to deal adequately with the issue of confidentiality. These findings do not mean that sex education lessons in secondary schools are inevitably poor. Nevertheless this study shows that a considered approach to formulation of sex education policies should be one of the first steps included in a national strategy on sex education.

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Health Education, vol. 99 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2009

Caitriona Higgins and Carol Ireland

This study explored the attitudes of prison officers, forensic staff and members of the public towards and male and female sex offenders. Participants were provided with a…

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1048

Abstract

This study explored the attitudes of prison officers, forensic staff and members of the public towards and male and female sex offenders. Participants were provided with a vignette depicting a specific sexual offence committed against either an adult or a child, by either a male or a female perpetrator, and were then asked to complete a scale assessing attitudes to sex offenders based on the offender depicted in the vignette. Forensic staff emerged as having the most positive attitudes to sex offenders, viewing them as individuals who could be rehabilitated. Prison officers emerged as having the most negative attitudes, in that they were supportive of harsh and untrusting attitudes. Overall, females emerged as viewing sex offenders in more positive terms, whereas males were more supportive of harsh attitudes to sex offenders. Respondents did not have a more negative attitude to female sex offenders than to male sex offenders.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Brieana D. Roumeliotis and Brian H. Kleiner

The purpose of this article is to identify various methods for responding to sexual harassment, defined in terms of quid pro quo and a hostile work environment, on an…

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2144

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to identify various methods for responding to sexual harassment, defined in terms of quid pro quo and a hostile work environment, on an individual basis within an organisation. Four individuals typically involved in sexual harassment cases are discussed: the supervisor or manager, the victim, any witnesses, and the perpetrator. Based on an analysis of the literature, individual efforts should be focused on prevention of sexual harassment by guarding one’s own behaviour and stopping potential problems early. A simple test to prevent sexual harassment used by a prominent company is given.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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