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Article

Seung Ho Park and Gerardo R. Ungson

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of blind spot to illustrate the misapplication of extant global strategies to emerging markets. The authors discuss cases…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of blind spot to illustrate the misapplication of extant global strategies to emerging markets. The authors discuss cases of multinationals and indigenous local companies to draw insights on firm operations in emerging markets. The authors unpack four specific blind spots that have resonated repeatedly in their operations: an adherence to unqualified scaling, the intractability of localization, the opacity of non-government intervention, and an undue attention to disruption rather than transformation. The study concludes with recommendations that can help companies be better aware of the blind spots and manage more effectively in emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual.

Findings

Four blind spots: an adherence to unqualified scaling, the intransitivity of localization, the illusion of non-government intervention, and an undue attention to disruption rather than transformation.

Practical implications

The paper is primarily for practitioners.

Originality/value

This study presents some of the key findings from our previous studies on emerging market issues. The authors recently published four different books on various themes on emerging markets. The findings presented in this paper come strictly from these previous projects.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article

Seung Ho Park and Gerardo R. Ungson

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the underlying drivers of sustained high performing companies based on a field study of 127 companies in Brazilian, Russian, Indian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the underlying drivers of sustained high performing companies based on a field study of 127 companies in Brazilian, Russian, Indian and Chinese (BRIC) and Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) emerging markets. Understanding these companies provides a complementary way of appraising the growth, development and transformation of emerging markets. The authors synthesize the findings in an overarching framework that covers six strategies for building and sustaining legacy that leads to the succession of intergenerational wealth over time: overcoming institutional voids, inclusive markets, deepening localization, nurturing government support, building core competencies and harnessing human capital. The authors relate these strategies to different levels of development using Prahalad and Hart’s BOP framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the underlying drivers of sustained high-performance companies based on field studies from an initial set of 105,260 BRIC companies and close to 500 companies in ASEAN. The methods employed four screening tests to arrive at a selection of the highest-performing firms: 70 firms in the BRIC nations and 58 firms from ASEAN. Following the selection, the authors constructed cases using primary interviews and secondary data, with the assistance of Ernst & Young and with academic colleagues in Manila. These studies were originally conducted in two separate time periods and reported accordingly. This paper synthesizes the findings of these two studies to arrive at an extended integrative framework.

Findings

From the cases, the authors examine six strategies for building and sustaining legacy that lead to high performance over time: overcoming institutional voids, creating inclusive markets, deepening localization, nurturing government support, building core competencies and harnessing human capital. To address the evolving state of institutional voids in these countries, the authors employ similar methods to hypothesize the placement of these strategies in the context of the world economic pyramid, initially formulated as the “bottom of the pyramid” framework.

Originality/value

This paper synthesizes and extends the authors’ previous works by proposing the concept of legacy to describe the emergence and succession of local exemplary firms in emerging markets. This study aims to complement extant measures of nation-growth based primarily on GDP. The paper also extends the literature on institutional voids in shifting the focus from the mix of voids to their evolving state. Altogether, the paper provides a complementary narrative on assessing the market potential of emerging markets by adopting several categories of performance.

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Article

Shaomin Li, Seung Ho Park and Rosey Shuji Bao

The purpose of this paper is to use the framework of rule-based and relation-based governance to examine the evolution of governance environment in the East Asian region…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the framework of rule-based and relation-based governance to examine the evolution of governance environment in the East Asian region including China, South Korea and Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Both qualitative and quantitative evidences are presented to demonstrate the paths these East Asian countries take in their transitions from relation-based governance to rule-based governance. Based on the framework, this analysis sheds light on the debate on whether East Asian economies will eventually move away from relation-based governance to rule-based societies.

Findings

The authors find that relation-based governance has helped East Asian countries achieve rapid economic growth in the early stages of their development. However, as the scale and scope of East Asian economies expand, continuing to rely on it may hinder their further development and therefore these countries should adopt a rule-based governance system in order to be efficient and competitive in the world market. While South Korea and Taiwan have made substantial progress in this transition, China has just embarked on the process.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to systematically review the theories and evidence of the transition and the challenges East Asian countries face during the process.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article

Shaomin Li, Seung Ho Park and David Duden Selover

The purpose of this paper is to develop the theoretical linkage between culture and economic growth and empirically test the relationship by measuring culture and how it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the theoretical linkage between culture and economic growth and empirically test the relationship by measuring culture and how it affects labor productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-section study of developing countries and regresses economic productivity growth on a set of control variables and cultural factors.

Findings

It is found that three cultural factors, economic attitudes, political attitudes, and attitudes towards the family, affect economic productivity growth.

Originality/value

Many economists ignore culture as a factor in economic growth, either because they discount the value of culture or because they have no simple way to quantify culture, resulting in the role of culture being under-researched. The study is the first to extensively examine the role of culture in productivity growth using large-scale data sources. The authors show that culture plays an important role in productivity gains across countries, contributing to the study of the effects of culture on economic development, and that culture can be empirically measured and linked to an activity that directly affects the economic growth – labor productivity.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Book part

Jean Boddewyn

This chapter complements the one that appeared as “History of the AIB Fellows: 1975–2008” in Volume 14 of this series (International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on…

Abstract

This chapter complements the one that appeared as “History of the AIB Fellows: 1975–2008” in Volume 14 of this series (International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on the First 50 Years and Beyond, Jean J. Boddewyn, Editor). It traces what happened under the deanship of Alan Rugman (2011–2014) who took many initiatives reported here while his death in July 2014 generated trenchant, funny, and loving comments from more than half of the AIB Fellows. The lives and contributions of many other major international business scholars who passed away from 2008 to 2014 are also evoked here: Endel Kolde, Lee Nehrt, Howard Perlmutter, Stefan Robock, John Ryans, Vern Terpstra, and Daniel Van Den Bulcke.

Details

Perspectives on Headquarters-subsidiary Relationships in the Contemporary MNC
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-370-2

Keywords

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Article

Shaomin Li, Seung Ho Park and Rosey Shuji Bao

The success and reliability of business transactions and research in emerging markets depend on the quality of financial information. Due to the institutional and…

Abstract

Purpose

The success and reliability of business transactions and research in emerging markets depend on the quality of financial information. Due to the institutional and historical backgrounds, financial information provided by firms in emerging markets has often been questioned for their accuracy. This study aims to examine the reliability of financial information through various descriptive and statistical analyses in major emerging markets, including Brazil, Russia, India, and China (the BRICs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use firm-level data from the BRIC countries and apply statistical models to identify patterns of profit misreporting by firms in these countries.

Findings

The results show significant and systemic signs of misreporting of financial information in these countries, particularly in China and Russia, which are further examined to understand the possible reasons behind their more severe misreporting.

Originality/value

The study then concludes with practical and specific recommendations for investors, managers, and policy makers on how to detect and avoid potential risks due to inaccurate financial information and improve the overall quality of decision making.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Developed markets have yet to return to pre-2008 crash levels of robust growth and stability. Emerging markets are back as the top priority, yet identifying the new BRIC nations is troublesome.

Originality

The briefing saves busy executives, strategists and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article

Yee Kwan Tang

This study aims at providing exploratory insights into the initiative and capabilities of Chinese SMEs to develop and utilize diverse networks to support…

Abstract

This study aims at providing exploratory insights into the initiative and capabilities of Chinese SMEs to develop and utilize diverse networks to support internationalization. Such network development and utilization efforts are fundamental to the analysis and explanation of Chinese firms’ internationalization patterns and outcomes. Extending from the existing network studies in the Chinese context that generally put emphasis on strong‐tie and ethnic‐oriented networks, this paper investigates and explains explicitly the use and effects of both strong‐ and weak‐tie networks in the international development of Chinese SMEs. Indepth case studies on four rapidly internationalized Chinese SMEs are conducted. The case findings demonstrate that weak‐tie networks are essential to the firms’ business development in foreign markets; and were proactively developed and utilized in the course of the firms’ development. The cases also provide alternative perspectives to the beliefs and values underpinning strong‐tie networks presumed in existing literature. The findings draw attention to the changing business values and approaches of the Chinese firms aiming at developing internationally. Managerial implications concerning the significant influence of effective networking on internationalization are pinpointed.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Content available
Article

Rosalie L. Tung

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article

Eun-Jee Kim, Sunyoung Park and Hye-Seung (Theresa) Kang

The purpose of this study is to augment knowledge of how work environment and personal characteristics affect intention to transfer in a work context. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to augment knowledge of how work environment and personal characteristics affect intention to transfer in a work context. This study aims to investigate the factors that can influence intention to transfer training in a professional development training context. The study examined the predictive capacity of organizational support, supervisor support, training readiness and learning motivation on transfer intention among the study respondents.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from teachers in secondary schools in the USA. The structural equation modeling method was adopted to analyze 216 responses using a self-report survey.

Findings

We found that (a) organizational support was directly associated with supervisor support for training, (b) supervisor support for training significantly influenced training readiness and motivation to learn, (c) training readiness positively affected motivation to learn, and (d) motivation to learn positively influenced intention to transfer. In addition, supervisor support mediated the relationships between organizational support and training readiness and between organizational support and motivation to learn. Training readiness linked intention to transfer and motivation to learn. Motivation to learn also played a mediating role in the relationship between supervisor support and intention to transfer.

Originality/value

Our findings add to the academic work on training transfer by empirically analyzing how both the environment (e.g. organizational support) and individual factors (e.g. learning motivation) influence employees’ intention to transfer. In particular, we investigated the potential impact of both organizational support and supervisory support on intentions to transfer, compared to previous studies emphasizing only supervisory support to improve training outcomes.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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