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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Joel M. Shulman, Raymond A.K. Cox and Thomas T. Stallkamp

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the model of the strategic entrepreneurial unit (SEU) as an alternative means for large firms to harness the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the model of the strategic entrepreneurial unit (SEU) as an alternative means for large firms to harness the entrepreneurial spirit and creation of intellectual property.

Design/methodology/approach

Several competing organizational models are critiqued based on factors that will impact the growth and return performance of the unit. The organizational units examined include corporate intrapreneurship, corporate spinout, corporate venturing, corporate venturing with venture capitalist participation, and the SEU.

Findings

Theoretically, by design, the SEU is a superior growth model to incubate newly created intellectual property. The achievement of greater growth and return with the SEU is shown because of equity compensation incentives, facilitator as liaison between the parent and new SEU with no control over harvest timing, lifeline back to parent for employees, intellectual property settlement prior to unit formation, and the financing provided by the internal capital market of the parent.

Research limitations/implications

The general review paper is conceptual in nature and would benefit from empirical evidence research. The case study method is proposed as a means to discern the efficacy of the SEU relative to other organizational forms.

Originality/value

The paper advances a business unit form to foster higher performance from new ideas within the confines of a large corporation.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Jürgen Rüdiger Smettan

This paper presents the results of an empirical study conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg, in 1989–91. The main…

Abstract

This paper presents the results of an empirical study conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg, in 1989–91. The main question of the study was ‘How does the potential perpetrator calculate the costs and benefits of a profitable criminal act?’. Decision theory is used to select a special set of variables in order to explain criminal enrichment and from this four variables explained most of the criminal behaviour that is planned and carried out to yield criminal profit. Subjective evaluations of profit, risk, punishment and moral costs explained 80–90 per cent of the willingness to commit a profitable crime. Data were collected based on a specially constructed questionnaire using hypothetical decision scenarios. Criminals and non‐criminals answered the questionnaire. The two groups mainly differed in their evaluation of the moral costs and in weighting the profits and punishment of a criminal offence.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Robin Johnson

The Social Exclusion Unit's report on mental health, published in the summer of 2004, had surprisingly little to say about housing. But behind the scenes there has been a…

Abstract

The Social Exclusion Unit's report on mental health, published in the summer of 2004, had surprisingly little to say about housing. But behind the scenes there has been a ferment of activity, and the National Institute for Mental Health for England (NIMHE) has been given the lead role in advancing all central government efforts to create a more joined‐up vision of mental health for the 21st century. NIMHE has taken the lead on implementation of the SEU's conclusions, and much more besides. A National Project Team on mental health and housing is to come together next year, with a wide‐ranging brief. This article looks at some of the issues that this new body will take on, including a new focus on research on the links between poor mental health and poor housing, and on evaluation of ‘housing‐based solutions’. As NIMHE itself is absorbed from April into the new Care Services Improvement Partnership, the prospects for linking housing with the community care modernisation agenda must be looking up.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Ian Leedham

Young people with multiple social problems, especially if compounded by additional needs such as those associated with mild learning disabilities or mental health…

Abstract

Young people with multiple social problems, especially if compounded by additional needs such as those associated with mild learning disabilities or mental health problems, are in particular danger of being excluded from society. Homelessness is one of the most extreme manifestations of such exclusion.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Xinde Li, Pei Li, Mohammad Omar Khyam, Xiangheng He and Shuzhi Sam Ge

As an automatic welding process may experience some disturbances caused by, for example, splashes and/or welding fumes, misalignments/poor positioning, thermally induced…

Abstract

Purpose

As an automatic welding process may experience some disturbances caused by, for example, splashes and/or welding fumes, misalignments/poor positioning, thermally induced deformations, strong arc lights and diversified welding joints/grooves, precisely identifying the welding seam has a great influence on the welding quality. This paper aims to propose a robust method for identifying this seam based on cross-modal perception.

Design/methodology/approach

First, after a welding image obtained from a structured-light vision sensor (here laser and vision are integrated into a cross-modal perception sensor) is filtered, in a sufficiently small area, the extended Kalman filter is used to prevent possible disturbances to search for its laser stripe. Second, to realize the extraction of the profile of welding seam, the least square method is used to fit a sequence of centroids determined by the scanning result of columns displayed on the tracking window. Third, this profile is then qualitatively described and matched using a proposed character string method.

Findings

It is demonstrated that it maintains real time and is clearly superior in terms of accuracy and robustness, though its real-time performance is not the best.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a robust method for automatically identifying and tracking a welding seam.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Rocci Luppicini and Eman Walabe

This study aims to explore the socio-cultural aspects of e-learning delivery in Saudi universities from the perspectives of universities’ instructors and expert designers…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the socio-cultural aspects of e-learning delivery in Saudi universities from the perspectives of universities’ instructors and expert designers from the Ministry of Education. More specifically, this study examined the opportunities and challenges faced in the development of online learning environments at Saudi universities from a socio-cultural perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research study addressed pervasive socio-cultural challenges connected to e-learning delivery in Saudi Arabia. Data collection methods consisted of 28 in-depth insider expert interviews as well a thematic analysis of documents related to socio-cultural aspects of e-learning delivery in Saudi Arabia.

Findings

Findings from the data analysis uncovered two main thematic areas connected to e-learning delivery in Saudi Arabia, namely, culture and female access to e-learning.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes original knowledge to international online learning research about the social and cultural complexity connected to online learning development in Saudi Arabia, as well as in other areas of the Arabic world where similar e-learning development initiatives are underway.

Practical implications

This research contributes original knowledge to international online learning research about the social and cultural complexity connected to online learning development in Saudi Arabia, as well as in other areas of the Arabic world where similar e-learning development initiatives are underway.

Social implications

This research contributes unique knowledge about the social and cultural complexity connected to online learning development in Saudi Arabia, as well as in other areas of the Arabic world where similar e-learning development initiatives are underway.

Originality/value

The interaction between Saudi culture and online learning has nurtured a unique learning model that adapts to cultural values to provide a quality learning experience.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Soo Hong Chew, King King Li, Robin Chark and Songfa Zhong

Purpose – This experimental economics study using brain imaging techniques investigates the risk-ambiguity distinction in relation to the source preference hypothesis (Fox…

Abstract

Purpose – This experimental economics study using brain imaging techniques investigates the risk-ambiguity distinction in relation to the source preference hypothesis (Fox & Tversky, 1995) in which identically distributed risks arising from different sources of uncertainty may engender distinct preferences for the same decision maker, contrary to classical economic thinking. The use of brain imaging enables sharper testing of the implications of different models of decision-making including Chew and Sagi's (2008) axiomatization of source preference.

Methodology/approach – Using fMRI, brain activations were observed when subjects make 48 sequential binary choices among even-chance lotteries based on whether the trailing digits of a number of stock prices at market closing would be odd or even. Subsequently, subjects rate familiarity of the stock symbols.

Findings – When contrasting brain activation from more familiar sources with those from less familiar ones, regions appearing to be more active include the putamen, medial frontal cortex, and superior temporal gyrus. ROI analysis showed that the activation patterns in the familiar–unfamiliar and unfamiliar–familiar contrasts are similar to those in the risk–ambiguity and ambiguity–risk contrasts reported by Hsu et al. (2005). This supports the conjecture that the risk-ambiguity distinction can be subsumed by the source preference hypothesis.

Research limitations/implications – Our odd–even design has the advantage of inducing the same “unambiguous” probability of half for each subject in each binary comparison. Our finding supports the implications of the Chew–Sagi model and rejects models based on global probabilistic sophistication, including rank-dependent models derived from non-additive probabilities, e.g., Choquet expected utility and cumulative prospect theory, as well as those based on multiple priors, e.g., α-maxmin. The finding in Hsu et al. (2005) that orbitofrontal cortex lesion patients display neither ambiguity aversion nor risk aversion offers further support to the Chew–Sagi model. Our finding also supports the Levy et al. (2007) contention of a single valuation system encompassing risk and ambiguity aversion.

Originality/value of chapter – This is the first neuroimaging study of the source preference hypothesis using a design which can discriminate among decision models ranging from risk-based ones to those relying on multiple priors.

Details

Neuroeconomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-304-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Hao Wang, Kai Ren, Jin Xie, Chen Zhang and Wencheng Tang

The face-centered cubic structured single-phase FeCoNiCrMn high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were prepared to study the friction and wear behavior of HEAs under MoS2-oil lubrication.

Abstract

Purpose

The face-centered cubic structured single-phase FeCoNiCrMn high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were prepared to study the friction and wear behavior of HEAs under MoS2-oil lubrication.

Design/methodology/approach

FeCoNiCrMn alloys were subjected to ball-on-disc reciprocating sliding against the GCr15 ball. L25(56) orthogonal wear tests were designed for velocity Vrel (4.167-20.833 mm/s), load FN (10-50 N), temperature T (RT-140 °C) and time t (5-20 min). Based on orthogonal test results, multivariate repeated measures ANOVA was performed, and further comparative experiments were conducted for Vrel, FN and T. Energy dispersive spectrometer and scanning electron microscope were applied to characterize the surface morphology of wear scar and its element distribution.

Findings

Vrel, FN and t exerted the most significant influence (p < 0.01) on the average friction coefficient f. Vrel and FN were identified as the momentous effect (p < 0.01) on wear volume ΔV. T (≥50 °C) had positive correlation with f and ΔV, and both Vrel and FN correlated negatively with f. The dominant abrasive wear was attributed to the large hardness difference of the friction pair. Fatigue wear and delamination wear were experienced at higher speeds (Vrel  ≥ 12.5 mm/s) and loading levels (FN ≥ 40 N). Elevated temperature weakens the lubrication effect of MoS2-oil and the mechanical properties of FeCoNiCrMn matrix, intensifying abrasive wear.

Originality/value

This study is expected to provide references for exploration on the wear behavior of single-phase HEAs under complex working conditions with lubrication and hence will help develop the application of HEAs in practical engineering.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/ILT-08-2019-0303

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 72 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Jenny Secker

In the UK the concept of social exclusion came into widespread use in mental health following the publication of an influential Social Exclusion Unit report in 2004. Based…

Abstract

In the UK the concept of social exclusion came into widespread use in mental health following the publication of an influential Social Exclusion Unit report in 2004. Based on a comparison of ways of defining social exclusion with the mental health literature, this article begins by outlining a social systems approach to understanding social exclusion. The approach is later used to examine the position of people with mental health needs in the UK. First, however, a common assumption that social inclusion constitutes the opposite of social exclusion is addressed and an alternative way of thinking about the two concepts is put forward. A further assumption that social inclusion is self‐evidently desirable is also critiqued from political and service user perspectives before drawing conclusions from the evidence reviewed. These concern a need for policy initiatives to focus on tackling the structural barriers that work to exclude people with mental health needs, as well as on challenging the deep‐rooted prejudice and stigmatisation that reinforce those barriers; and a need to be mindful of the context in which inclusion policies are implemented, the assumptions that become implicit within these policies, and the possible consequences of their adoption as a moral imperative.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Zhong Wei, Guangming Song, Huiyu Sun, Qien Qi, Yuan Gao and Guifang Qiao

This paper aims to study the turning strategies for the bounding quadruped robot with an active spine and explore the significant role of the spine in the turning locomotion.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the turning strategies for the bounding quadruped robot with an active spine and explore the significant role of the spine in the turning locomotion.

Design/methodology/approach

Firstly, the bounding gait combining the pitch motion of the spine with the leg motion is presented. In this gait, the spine moves in phase with the front legs. All the joints of the legs and spine are controlled by cosine signals to simplify the control, and the initial position and oscillation amplitude of the joints can be tuned. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed gait, the spine joints are set with different initial positions and oscillation amplitudes, and the initial position and oscillation amplitude of the leg joints are tuned to make the virtual model do the best locomotion in terms of the speed and stability in the simulation. The control signals are also used to control a real robot called Transleg. Then, three different turning strategies are proposed, including driving the left and right legs with different strides, swaying the spine in the yaw direction and combining the above two methods. Finally, these strategies are tested on the real robot.

Findings

The stable bounding locomotion can be achieved using the proposed gait. With the spine motion, the speed of the bounding locomotion is increased; the turning radius is reduced; and the angular velocity is increased.

Originality/value

A simple and flexible planning of the bounding gait and three turning strategies for the bounding quadruped robot are proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed bounding gait, along with the beneficial effect of the spine motion in the yaw direction on the turning locomotion is demonstrated with the computer simulations and robot experiments. This will be instructive for the designing and actuating of the other quadruped robots.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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