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Dekar Urumsah

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally…

Abstract

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally. This is especially relevant in the context of Indonesian Airline companies. Therefore, many airline customers in Indonesia are still in doubt about it, or even do not use it. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for e-services adoption and empirically examines the factors influencing the airlines customers in Indonesia in using e-services offered by the Indonesian airline companies. Taking six Indonesian airline companies as a case example, the study investigated the antecedents of e-services usage of Indonesian airlines. This study further examined the impacts of motivation on customers in using e-services in the Indonesian context. Another important aim of this study was to investigate how ages, experiences and geographical areas moderate effects of e-services usage.

The study adopts a positivist research paradigm with a two-phase sequential mixed method design involving qualitative and quantitative approaches. An initial research model was first developed based on an extensive literature review, by combining acceptance and use of information technology theories, expectancy theory and the inter-organizational system motivation models. A qualitative field study via semi-structured interviews was then conducted to explore the present state among 15 respondents. The results of the interviews were analysed using content analysis yielding the final model of e-services usage. Eighteen antecedent factors hypotheses and three moderating factors hypotheses and 52-item questionnaire were developed. A focus group discussion of five respondents and a pilot study of 59 respondents resulted in final version of the questionnaire.

In the second phase, the main survey was conducted nationally to collect the research data among Indonesian airline customers who had already used Indonesian airline e-services. A total of 819 valid questionnaires were obtained. The data was then analysed using a partial least square (PLS) based structural equation modelling (SEM) technique to produce the contributions of links in the e-services model (22% of all the variances in e-services usage, 37.8% in intention to use, 46.6% in motivation, 39.2% in outcome expectancy, and 37.7% in effort expectancy). Meanwhile, path coefficients and t-values demonstrated various different influences of antecedent factors towards e-services usage. Additionally, a multi-group analysis based on PLS is employed with mixed results. In the final findings, 14 hypotheses were supported and 7 hypotheses were not supported.

The major findings of this study have confirmed that motivation has the strongest contribution in e-services usage. In addition, motivation affects e-services usage both directly and indirectly through intention-to-use. This study provides contributions to the existing knowledge of e-services models, and practical applications of IT usage. Most importantly, an understanding of antecedents of e-services adoption will provide guidelines for stakeholders in developing better e-services and strategies in order to promote and encourage more customers to use e-services. Finally, the accomplishment of this study can be expanded through possible adaptations in other industries and other geographical contexts.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

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Article

Joanna Fox

User involvement in research is entering the mainstream of traditional mental health research. In practice, there are diverse ways in which the process of involvement is…

Abstract

Purpose

User involvement in research is entering the mainstream of traditional mental health research. In practice, there are diverse ways in which the process of involvement is experienced by mental health service user researchers. This paper aims to explore two diverse experiences of involvement by the researcher.

Design/methodology/approach

Auto-ethnography is the research methodology used in this study; it combines a process of reflective writing and critical analysis which enables the author to explore experiences of being both a service user and academic researcher. Two accounts of the author’s involvement in mental health research are presented: one which builds on a consultation model and the other based on co-production principles.

Findings

Experiences of power-sharing and collaborative decision-making, alongside disempowerment, are discussed, leading to exploration of the theoretical and practical processes for promoting participation of users in research.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited because it is undertaken by one individual in a local setting, and is therefore is not generalisable; however, it provides useful insights into the diverse processes of involvement that many service users experience.

Practical implications

Recommendations are presented to support the involvement of service users in research, with final remarks offered considering the possible future implementation of this still emerging tradition.

Originality/value

This paper reflects on the experiences of one service user academic involved in research and highlights diverse experiences of both empowering and disempowering involvement, providing recommendations for best practice.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article

Jane Benten and Nicola Spalding

The Department of Health's introduction of intermediate care recognised the need for rehabilitation following acute hospital care. The importance of rehabilitation was…

Abstract

The Department of Health's introduction of intermediate care recognised the need for rehabilitation following acute hospital care. The importance of rehabilitation was also stressed by a review carried out across England and Wales by District Audit. This article reports a phenomenological study carried out to explore service users' experiences of a 22‐bedded intermediate care service. Face‐to‐face, semi‐structured interviews were conducted with eight service users who were older people, with a further follow‐up interview two weeks later. Data was analysed using an open‐coding and theming approach. One of the six emergent themes is discussed in this article: service users' rehabilitation experiences. Data was themed into a rehabilitation framework of users' understanding, assessment and goal setting, interventions and transfer home. Intermediate care was found to provide support for service users between discharge from acute hospital and return to their own homes, but service users lacked understanding and awareness of the potential of the intermediate care service. They did not feel involved in their assessment and goal setting and so were unable to make individual contributions regarding their own rehabilitation needs. Interventions were subsequently not linked to their needs and transfer home experiences were variable. Users' experiences did not reflect the Department of Health's four principles that underpin the delivery of intermediate care: person‐centred care; whole system working; timely access to specialist care; promoting health and an active life. Recommendations are made to address these and to incorporate the recommendations from District Audit.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Sara Sandström, Peter Magnusson and Per Kristensson

The purpose of this paper is to bring better understanding to how involving users in the development process of new mobile phone services can increase understanding of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring better understanding to how involving users in the development process of new mobile phone services can increase understanding of the overall service experience in a technology‐based service setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an experimental setting which aims to emulate the involvement of users in a service development process in order to provide information regarding the overall service experience. This is done by letting users evaluate both user‐ and company‐created services.

Findings

Users are found to be an important information source when it comes to understanding the overall service experience of technology‐based services. The paper shows that users are to some extent better at coming up with services regarding value in use. The findings show that some of the most important experience outcomes that are demanded, functionally related outcomes, are better met by user‐created services.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides empirical evidence regarding the importance of a user perspective when it comes to understanding both the functional and emotional parts of the overall technology‐based service experience. The result of this paper implies a more advanced user focus during service development in order to be able to know what it is that creates value for technology‐based service users. Just how technology‐based services are functionally and emotionally experienced by their users is a fairly new research area and more empirical studies regarding this subject will be called for in the future.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence of the importance of a user perspective when creating value propositions for technology‐based service users. From a managerial point of view, it is of interest to see whether it will be possible to learn more about the users' service experience of technology‐based services by involving them in the development process.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article

Nadia Zainuddin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of experience levels on consumers' value perceptions in their use of a social marketing preventative health service. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of experience levels on consumers' value perceptions in their use of a social marketing preventative health service. The study uses services thinking to investigate customer value in a social marketing consumption situation.

Design/methodology/approach

An online, self-completion survey was conducted on n=853 Australian women who were users of breastscreening services.

Findings

Experienced users derived higher levels of functional and emotional value than novice users and reported higher levels of satisfaction and behavioural intentions to use the service again. However, path analysis indicated that satisfaction was a stronger driver of behavioural intentions for novice users.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the need to understand and segment target audiences in more meaningful ways beyond traditional demographic segmentation. There is a need to understand the value benefits that target audiences seek and acknowledge that these value and service experience perceptions are likely to change over time as target audiences transition from novice to experienced users. This is useful in allowing health services to consider ways of providing a degree of customisation to target audiences, resulting in higher levels of satisfaction, particularly amongst novice users, leading to behavioural intentions to return.

Originality/value

Two novel approaches are used to understand social marketing behaviour: value theory and a services perspective. Through the examination of experience levels, this study acknowledges the enduring nature of many social marketing behaviours, allowing social marketers to examine differences in target audiences' experiences based on whether they are new to or familiar with a behaviour. This provides a fresh perspective in understanding target audiences in social marketing through an understanding of their value perceptions which influence their behaviour, and how these value perceptions are likely to change over time.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article

Susan Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to describe processes of learning from personal experiences of mental distress when mental health service users participate in occupational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe processes of learning from personal experiences of mental distress when mental health service users participate in occupational therapy education with tutors and students who have also had experiences of mental distress.

Design/methodology/approach

A post-structural theoretical perspective was applied to stories which emerged from the research process. Semi-structured group and individual interviews were used with three service users, three students and three tutors (including the author) who had all had, at some time in their lives, experiences of mental distress.

Findings

Stories based on previously hidden personal experiences of mental distress began to shift dominant understandings. Further, as educators, service users challenged whose authority it is to speak about mental distress and permitted different narrative positions for students and tutors. However, technologies of power and technologies of self of powerful discourses in professional education continued to disqualify and exclude personal knowledges. Learning from stories requires a critical approach to storytelling to expose how hidden power relations maintain some knowledges as dominant. Further, learning requires narrative work, which was often hidden and unaccounted for, to navigate complex and contradictory positions in learning.

Social implications

Although storytelling based on personal experience can help develop a skilled and healthy mental health workforce, its impact will be limited without changes in classrooms, courses and higher education which support learning at the margins of personal/professional and personal/political learning.

Originality/value

Learning from stories of mental distress requires conditions which take account of the hidden practices which operate in mental health professional education.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article

Nicholas Dent

The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of appreciative inquiry (AI) methodology in enabling co-productive work within mental health service development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of appreciative inquiry (AI) methodology in enabling co-productive work within mental health service development.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of AI is described and observations on its use in mental health service improvement are considered.

Findings

AI is a really helpful tool in supporting service improvement and is particularly applicable in mental health discussions involving service users and carers. Many service users and carers engaging with service development discussions have had adverse past experiences which can inhibit their successful contribution to planning discussions. AI allows a more positive reflection on how services can be improved which can help achieve positive results.

Research limitations/implications

AI methodology is a really useful tool in supporting improvement discussions across health, and other public, services, and is particularly valuable in engaging mental health service users and carers in such activity.

Practical implications

The method is useful across service development needs and could be developed to support mental health service improvement locally, regionally and nationally. Developing the use of this method could make a real contribution to improving relations between service users, carers and health staff and support meaningful and positive change in the delivery of mental health services.

Social implications

Helping to overcome dissonance between service users and carers, and health staff and commissioners; and developing the use of appreciative enquiry could enhance the value of co-production as a key driver for service improvement.

Originality/value

The author is aware of little discussion of the value of appreciative enquiry in the growing literature around co-production in mental health.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article

Meadhbh Campbell and Charlotte Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to explore mental health service usersexperiences of involvement in a clinical psychology course.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore mental health service usersexperiences of involvement in a clinical psychology course.

Design/methodology/approach

Five participants were recruited from a service user and carer group aligned to a university professional clinical psychology course. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and data were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Four superordinate themes, group processes, advocating, transforming and power, were drawn from the data, with ten subthemes emerging capturing experiences on the personal, professional and group levels.

Research limitations/implications

The study is not generalisable and has a small number of participants. However, many of the themes have resonance with existing literature.

Practical implications

Service user initiatives need to consider the personal and contextual issues that service users may have experienced prior to their involvement. The needs of service user initiatives may change over time. Such initiatives must evolve in conjunction with the personal and political journeys of participants.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored the experiences of mental health service users in clinical psychology training using a robust methodology. The current study suggests that eliciting these experiences highlights factors that facilitate involvement as well as the barriers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article

Charlotte Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to explore student experiences of learning from mental health service users and carers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore student experiences of learning from mental health service users and carers.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 clinical psychology trainees and ex-trainees took part in an online survey (n=21) or focus group (n=9). Responses were analysed using interpretative thematic analysis.

Findings

A number of themes were identified. There were two pre-conditions of learning: valuing the teaching and emotional arousal. Participants’ learning experiences were characterised by cognitive and meta-cognitive processes: active learning, reflection, increased attention and vivid memories. Furthermore, participants might have a meta-cognitive experience of having learned something, but being unsure what that something was. Participants reported learning about the lives of service users, about themselves and about the wider societal context for people with mental health difficulties.

Practical implications

In order to facilitate learning students should value the input of service users. This allows them to contain and use the emotional arousal the teaching produces. Furthermore, leaving students with a feeling that something has been learned but not being exactly sure what that has been may facilitate students seeking out further opportunities for service user involvement.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored the process of learning from mental health service users and carers. In the current study, the emotion aroused in participants was primary. Furthermore, a new meta-cognitive experience, namely, the experience of having learned something, but not being sure what has been learned, has been identified.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article

Mike Brady

Telephone triage or hear and treat (H&T) describes the process of UK ambulance services nurses and paramedics undertaking enhanced telephone assessments of patients to…

Abstract

Purpose

Telephone triage or hear and treat (H&T) describes the process of UK ambulance services nurses and paramedics undertaking enhanced telephone assessments of patients to determine the most appropriate response, which can sometimes result in no ambulance being sent. Given, however, that 999 is not considered an advice service, it may be reasonable to assert that the expectation of those calling 999 is always an immediate ambulance response. This may not always be realised and may affect patient experience. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the following: to what extent are the views of UK ambulance telephone triage service users being gathered? In answering this research question, this review also aims to explore the findings to determine service users’ expectations of ambulance telephone triage and the possibility that these expectations are influenced by the UK media. The findings of which could be used to inform the need and nature of future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Phase one consisted of a computerised literature search of online databases CINAHL, Pubmed, Science Direct, Cochrane library, Web of Science and UK government-funded databases. Phase two consisted of searches of all UK ambulance services websites and the submission of freedom of information requests. Phase three consisted of a computerised literature search of the ProQuest international news-stream database.

Findings

A total of 78 results were identified and after further screening 34 results were excluded, leaving 44 for final review. The extent to which users experience of ambulance service telephone triage are being gathered is low; and often limited to one off pieces of non-peer reviewed work. Patients felt overall that they were treated with respect, dignity and care. However, being listened to, reducing anxiety and a need for prompt assurances remain important to those whose overriding expectation is that an ambulance should attend every time a 999 call is made. There appears to be a balanced media portrayal of H&T with the UK media. However, unrealistic public expectations represent a significant barrier to providing sustainable care that users consider to be of high quality.

Research limitations/implications

Some user experiences may have been gathered in more broad research exercises which explored various aspects of 999 ambulance service experience. This was not included if it could not be clearly differentiated as being related to H&T and thus may have resulted in data being omitted. It was not possible to systematically search social media platforms (such as facebook or twitter) for any media results related to this search strategy; only traditional print and online media platforms. This also may have resulted in data being omitted. The inclusion of non-peer reviewed research results and grey literature represents a possible limitation to the conclusions drawn within this review. The concept of Insider Research Bias cannot be ignored within this review. The author himself practices in telephone triage within a UK ambulance service; however, this insider bias is mitigated by the clearly articulated systematic methodology and use of the Critical Appraisal Skills framework. In a similar vein, reviews of this nature are also often conducted as part of a team, to reduce bias, increase objectivity and ensure the validity of findings. This review was a sole effort, and while this is not uncommon, there were no cross checks by peers of the search terms, strategy, paper selection, exclusion criteria or data extraction. This lack of peer critique is considered a possible limitation in mitigating selection and reviewer bias.

Practical implications

The results of this review would suggest a need to increase the amount of research and patient feedback gathered from those being assessed and managed by ambulance service telephone triage within the UK. Ambulance services could hold regular monthly small-scale qualitative interviews with patients and families to ascertain their views, perceptions and anxieties which can then provide an up-to-date understanding of user expectations and the health educational needs of local communities. Patient feedback received directly to ambulance services or via the Patient Advice and Liaison Service could be retrospectively analysed by researchers to determine key themes of positive practice or negative patient experience. Such feedback can be tracked through time and be used as a pre and post community intervention measure, to determine any changes. Moving forward, nationally standardised research frameworks should be adopted to provide more easily collated local and national data, which can monitor improvement strategies and provide a comparison between services to aid the sharing of best practice principles.

Originality/value

There is no other piece of work published which has reviewed the data in this area of clinical practice within the UK.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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