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1 – 10 of over 14000
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Jennifer Rowley and Frances Slack

The purpose of this paper is to propose a multi‐dimensional taxonomy for information kiosk‐based self service technologies (SSTs). This taxonomy has an important…

2075

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a multi‐dimensional taxonomy for information kiosk‐based self service technologies (SSTs). This taxonomy has an important contribution to make to the integration of research and development, in relation to information kiosks. There are aspects that may also be extended to e‐service, online service and self‐service.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual context for this work is established by a review of previous literature. This focuses on taxonomies and classification schemes relating to information kiosks, traditional services (p‐services) and e‐services. A comprehensive database of information kiosk technologies and their applications is constructed. Longitudinal observation of the development of information kiosk technologies is the basis for this and has been extended by web research.

Findings

An iterative analysis of the kiosk database defines the nature of service delivery from kiosks, and supports the identification and verification of the dimensions and sub‐dimensions of the taxonomy. It is informed by earlier classification schemes and taxonomies in the information kiosk, e‐service and p‐service literature.

Originality/value

This taxonomy has four main dimensions: Location, User, Task and Technology. Sub‐dimensions are developed for each of these main dimensions. It can be used to classify all information kiosks.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 63 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Georgia Sales

As information technology has become increasingly accessible and familiar, and as the benefits have become increasingly well understood, the public's expectations and…

1955

Abstract

As information technology has become increasingly accessible and familiar, and as the benefits have become increasingly well understood, the public's expectations and demands for information have grown. Nowhere is this more true than in the human services. A wide variety of professionals have found a need for systematic access to information about human service organizations in their communities and in response have developed resource files of varying degrees of sophistication. Whether the file is set up on a rolodex, in a printed directory, or in a complicated computerized system, those using it immediately recognize that they have to have a way of indexing and accessing the information that allows them to get to the right organization in a minimum of time.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

R.G. Wyckham, P.T. Fitzroy and G.D. Mandry

Examines the little attention given to services in the marketing literature, concluding that products versus services as a taxonomy, is difficult to sustain and likely to…

1741

Abstract

Examines the little attention given to services in the marketing literature, concluding that products versus services as a taxonomy, is difficult to sustain and likely to be dysfunctional. Argues the need to develop multi‐dimensional taxonomies that include market characteristics, relating results to the firm's marketing strategy. Proposes to stir discussion of the applicability of this separation of products and services, with particular reference to the characteristics used to make this distinction. Contends that, in terms of marketing, services are not differing too much from products, and develops this contention. Concludes that the literature relating to the distinction between products and services is found wanting and more work needs to be done.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

T.T. Niranjan, K.B.C. Saxena and Sangeeta S. Bharadwaj

This paper sets out to classify business process outsourcing (BPO), linking it to service level agreement (SLA) design needs.

1711

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to classify business process outsourcing (BPO), linking it to service level agreement (SLA) design needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a framework based on prior literature to classify BPOs and illustrates it with field research of Indian vendors.

Findings

The paper identifies criticality and complexity as the dimensions of classification and explicates the role of SLAs along these dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory research involving four vendors. A larger study is needed to strengthen/enrich the proposed framework, and make the findings more conclusive.

Practical implications

The taxonomy aids BPO industry practitioners in understanding the characteristics of different processes and the control issues arising therein. It also helps analysts to make more qualified generalizations within the BPO industry.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a dearth of literature on BPOs, especially from a vendor perspective. The taxonomy serves to position future work in this fast‐growing field of research.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Chun‐Hsien Liu and Chu‐Ching Wang

The paper aims to develop a service taxonomy model and a mathematical process to forecast a competitor's service business strategy in a multiple service business context…

2000

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to develop a service taxonomy model and a mathematical process to forecast a competitor's service business strategy in a multiple service business context by inputting CI data such as the profits of existing core services.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative method of literature review is adopted to build a service taxonomy model and form two propositions. Based on the multiple business process integration concept of the resource‐based view, a mathematical process constituted by service modules and weights is developed. Salient components of the competitor's service business are identified to forecast the competitor's service business strategy after utilizing optimization heuristics of 80/20 and large number rules.

Findings

The model is able not only to forecast a competitor's service business strategy, but can also help develop the firm's own new service strategy. The resources of the firm can then be realigned to counteract the competitor's strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The developed model is mainly applicable to service businesses. The collection and use of CI data must consider ethical issues, which might limit the sources of data.

Practical implications

To forecast a competitor's strategy correctly , good quality CI practice is necessary. Experienced people in the CI department are critical to the production of good quality forecasts.

Originality/value

The contribution to CI impact studies is that the mathematical forecasting process is developed based on qualitative service taxonomical research. Key elements of the service process are identified as salient elements, which serve as the main focusing points in forecasting competitors' strategy.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

María Dionisia Elche Hortelano and Ángela Gongález‐Moreno

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of innovation in services. First, service firms were classified according to the degree of customization of…

1023

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of innovation in services. First, service firms were classified according to the degree of customization of service product and technology, because it reflects the degree of interaction between producer and consumer. This is a key element in the process of production and, hence, in the innovation developed by these firms. Second, we identified four different modes of innovation in Spanish service firms, which reflect diverse patterns of innovation according to depth of changes introduced by firms. Finally, we examined how the innovation patterns are generalized by the type of service firms, confirming that there is a relationship between production and innovation strategies. This paper yields empirical evidence from Spanish services, showing that service firms develop innovations coherently according to their production strategy.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Henning Droege, Dagmar Hildebrand and Miguel A. Heras Forcada

The purpose of this paper is, firstly, to review existing schools of thought and to identify present research fields in new service development (NSD) and service

11380

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is, firstly, to review existing schools of thought and to identify present research fields in new service development (NSD) and service innovation research, and, secondly, to discuss future research opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review is based on a search for “service innovation” and “NSD” in titles, abstracts and keywords of articles. As a result of looking at the references, as well as through analysis of papers which cite the articles identified, additional publications are included in this study.

Findings

Four schools of thought and five distinct research fields are presented. Herein, the authors show that there is a lack of studies of organisational innovations, and that differences in the drivers for radical or incremental innovations may be of degree rather than of kind. Further, contradictory results in the research field on differences versus similarities of new product and NSD are identified. In addition, the authors propose possible pathways for future research for each research field and school of thought.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of publications included in this review may be subject to criticism as book‐publications may be under‐represented in this review. Also, the keywords used for the initial search could include additional words.

Originality/value

The paper groups previously scattered research activities from various backgrounds such as marketing and operations into distinct research fields, and presents both the status quo and a discussion of possible directions for future research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

William Lehr and Lee W. McKnight

Delivering real‐time services (Internet telephony, video conferencing, and streaming media as well as business‐critical data applications) across the Internet requires…

1182

Abstract

Delivering real‐time services (Internet telephony, video conferencing, and streaming media as well as business‐critical data applications) across the Internet requires end‐to‐end quality of service (QoS) guarantees, which requires a hierarchy of contracts. These standardized contracts may be referred to as service level agreements (SLAs). SLAs provide a mechanism for service providers and customers to flexibly specify the service to be delivered. The emergence of bandwidth and service agents, traders, brokers, exchanges and contracts can provide an institutional and business framework to support effective competition. This article identifies issues that must be addressed by SLAs for consumer applications. We introduce a simple taxonomy for classifying SLAs based on the identity of the contracting parties. We conclude by discussing implications for public policy, Internet architecture, and competition.

Details

info, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Lawrence F. Cunningham, Clifford E. Young, Moonkyu Lee and Wolfgang Ulaga

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study that examined how customers in the USA, France, and Korea perceived and classified a set of 13 services

5076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study that examined how customers in the USA, France, and Korea perceived and classified a set of 13 services based on multidimensional scaling (MDS).

Design/methodology/approach

A MDS framework was used to map service classifications and actual services in the USA, Korea and France. Results from each country were then compared to the other two countries to determine similarities and differences.

Findings

Results from this research suggest that there are two underlying dimensions that explain approximately 80 percent of the total variance in service perceptions and classifications. Underlying dimensions of the classifications across the three cultures were virtually identical. Differences among the countries were based on relative positioning of classifications and/or services on the underlying dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Evidence from diverse cultures implies that consumers perceive services in a somewhat simplistic, two‐dimensional fashion rather than the complex set of classifications proposed by researchers. Although the complex classifications may be of use to service providers in organizing the delivery of services, the presentation and positioning of those services is along a much simpler framework in the minds of customers.

Originality/value

This is the first time consumer‐based perceptions of services have been examined systematically across cultures using a MDS approach.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Maryam Khan and Mahmood A. Khan

This paper seeks to deal with an exploratory analysis of the impact of technological innovations on the extent of outreach of hospitality services to customers.

7945

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to deal with an exploratory analysis of the impact of technological innovations on the extent of outreach of hospitality services to customers.

Design/methodology/approach

After a review of several hospitality services, two factors were selected to assess their outreach to customers: location of service provider; and direct or indirect service delivery mode.

Findings

Placing these factors on different axes, cells were created to distinguish innovative features of these services. It became apparent that, as the technological innovations develop, new categories of services are emerging. These categories were placed into six different cells identifying services based on their innovative characteristics. When the proximity of the service provider to the customer is less, the range of services involves: service and style improvements; service‐line extensions; and major service innovations. With the increase in distance between service provider and customer, service processes become prominent and involve: process improvements; process‐line extensions; and major process innovations. With the advancement of technology, services move from direct to indirect delivery mode in both service and service process innovations. In order to illustrate the assumptions, examples of services and technology used are provided.

Research limitations/implications

Recommendations are provided for utilizing technology for enhancing services based on the location of their target markets. This is an exploratory analysis of the current situation, which will rapidly change with technological developments.

Practical implications

Findings led to the recommendations for service innovations, location of desired markets, and providing services to customers at near and far locations. Service providers and marketers can benefit by utilizing innovative technology suitable for reaching their selected target customers.

Originality/value

The work is a first step in studying services, technology use, and outreach to customers. Identifying service categories will help service marketers in locating their target market and providing services to customers using developing technology.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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