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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Aline Pietrix Seepma, Carolien de Blok and Dirk Pieter Van Donk

Many countries aim to improve public services by use of information and communication technology (ICT) in public service supply chains. However, the literature does not…

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2279

Abstract

Purpose

Many countries aim to improve public services by use of information and communication technology (ICT) in public service supply chains. However, the literature does not address how inter-organizational ICT is used in redesigning these particular supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to explore this important and under-investigated area.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative multiple-case study was performed based on 36 interviews, 39 documents, extensive field visits and observations providing data on digital transformation in four European criminal justice supply chains.

Findings

Two different design approaches to digital transformation were found, which are labelled digitization and digitalization. These approaches are characterized by differences in public service strategies, performance aims, and how specific public characteristics and procedures are dealt with. Despite featuring different roles for ICT, both types show the viable digital transformation of public service supply chains. Additionally, the application of inter-organizational ICT is found not to automatically result in changes in the coordination and management of the chain, in contrast to common assumptions.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to adopt an inter-organizational perspective on the use of ICT in public service supply chains. The findings have scientific and managerial value because fine-grained insights are provided into how public service supply chains can use ICT in an inter-organizational setting. The study shows the dilemmas faced by and possible options for public organizations when designing digital service delivery.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Vikas Kumar, Marlene Amorim, Arijit Bhattacharya and Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes

This study aims to address the management of reverse flows in the context of service supply chains. The study builds on the characteristics of services production reported…

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3048

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the management of reverse flows in the context of service supply chains. The study builds on the characteristics of services production reported in literature to: identify diverse types of reverse flows in services supply chains, discuss key issues associated to the management of reverse service flows and suggest directions for research for developing the knowledge for management of reverse flows in service contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This study first provides an overview of the theoretical background which supports the identification and the characterization of the flows, and the reverse flows, involved in service production. A short summary of each paper accepted in this special issue is also provided to give readers an overview of the various issues around reverse exchanges in service supply chains that authors have attempted to address.

Findings

In this study, the authors identify distinct types of reverse flows in services production building on the analysis of the characteristics of service production and delivery reported in the literature. Our discussion highlights the fact that service supply chains can be quite diverse in the type of exchanges of inputs and outputs that take place between customers and providers, showing that often there can be substantial flows of items to return. In particular, and differently from manufacturing contexts, the authors highlight that in service supply chains, providers might need to handle bi-directional reverse flows.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of research on reverse service supply chains is, to a great extent, a consequence of dominant paradigms which often identify the absence of physical product flows as a key distinguishing feature of service supply chains, and therefore lead to the misbelief that in services there is nothing to return. This special issue therefore aims to clarify this misunderstanding through the limited selection of eight papers that address various issues around reverse exchanges in service supply chains.

Originality/value

While theoretical and empirical research in supply chain is abundant, management of reverse exchanges in service supply chain is sparse. In this special issue we aim to provide the first contribution to understand how the characteristics of service production raise new issues for the management of reverse flows in service supply chains, and to foster the development of adequate management strategies.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Kum Fai Yuen and Vinh Van Thai

An implicit assumption of current supply chain integration (SCI) research is that the results obtained from product supply chains can be directly extrapolated to service

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2490

Abstract

Purpose

An implicit assumption of current supply chain integration (SCI) research is that the results obtained from product supply chains can be directly extrapolated to service supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to question this assumption of equivalence by proposing that the effects of internal integration (II) and external integration (EI) on operational performance (OP) are contingent on whether a firm operates in a product and service supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the contingency theory, a model that specifies and contrasts the interrelationships between II, EI, and OP in product and service supply chains was proposed. Subsequently, measures were developed and survey data were collected from 138 product and 174 service companies in Singapore. The data were then analysed using multi-sampling analysis.

Findings

The effects of II and EI on OP varied significantly between product and service supply chains. In addition, the relationship between II and OP was found to be partially mediated by EI in product supply chains whereas a fully mediated relationship was observed in service supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

Within the context of SCI, different mediation patterns exist in product and service supply chains. The results suggest adopting a contingency rather than a universalistic approach in the management of firms’ internal and external integrative capabilities to maximise OP. Specifically, managers should adjust their II and EI efforts to achieve congruency with the type of supply chain they serve.

Originality/value

This paper tests the assumption of equivalence and extends the current scope of SCI contingency research by cross-examining the effects of II and EI on OP in both product and service supply chains simultaneously.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Henk Akkermans and Chris Voss

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how the bullwhip effect, as found in product supply chains, might also manifest itself in services, as well as what…

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5804

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how the bullwhip effect, as found in product supply chains, might also manifest itself in services, as well as what policies can be successful for mitigating it.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of analytic methods was used – inductive case analysis and analysis of data from two service supply chains in the telecom industry.

Findings

Empirical evidence from two cases was examined and provides support for the presence of a service bullwhip effect. Quantitative and qualitative case data were used to explore how this effect manifests itself in services, the distinctive drivers of the bullwhip effect in services, and the managerial actions that can either trigger or mitigate these bullwhip effects. In total, eight propositions are developed and three types of characteristics that potentially make the bullwhip effect worse in services than in manufacturing are identified: the destabilizing effects of manual rework in otherwise automated service processes; the omission of accurate and timely data on rework volumes upstream in the chain, pointing at future bullwhip effects downstream; and the lack of a supplychain mindset within the various departments jointly responsible for delivering the service, leading to longer delays in reacting to service bullwhips as they develop over time.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on two cases within a single industry, limiting generalizability. The propositions developed need testing in a wider set of contexts, including hybrid service and product supply chains.

Practical implications

The implications of this research can help organizations prevent or reduce the negative impact of planned and unplanned fluctuations in their service supply chains.

Originality/value

This paper explores an area that has been well researched in manufacturing, but not in services, and it contributes to both the theory and practice of service supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Qile He, Abby Ghobadian, David Gallear, Loo-See Beh and Nicholas O'Regan

– Recognizing the heterogeneity of services, this paper aims to clarify the characteristics of forward and the corresponding reverse supply chains of different services.

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2332

Abstract

Purpose

Recognizing the heterogeneity of services, this paper aims to clarify the characteristics of forward and the corresponding reverse supply chains of different services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a two-dimensional typology matrix, representing four main clusters of services according to the degree of input standardization and the degree of output tangibility. Based on this matrix, this paper develops a typology and parsimonious conceptual models illustrating the characteristics of forward and the corresponding reverse supply chains of each cluster of services.

Findings

The four main clusters of service supply chains have different characteristics. This provides the basis for the identification, presentation and explanation of the different characteristics of their corresponding reverse service supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research can help future researchers to analyse, map and model forward and reverse service supply chains, and to identify potential research gaps in the area.

Practical/implications

The findings of the research can help managers of service firms to gain better visibility of their forward and reverse supply chains, and refine their business models to help extend their reverse/closed-loop activities. Furthermore, the findings can help managers to better optimize their service operations to reduce service gaps and potentially secure new value-adding opportunities.

Originality/value

This paper is the first, to the authors ' knowledge, to conceptualize the basic structure of the forward and reverse service supply chains while dealing with the high level of heterogeneity of services.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Kostas Selviaridis and Andreas Norrman

The performance of service supply chains in terms of service levels and cost efficiency depends not only on the effort of service providers but also on the inputs of…

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5229

Abstract

Purpose

The performance of service supply chains in terms of service levels and cost efficiency depends not only on the effort of service providers but also on the inputs of sub-contractors and the customer. In this sense, performance-based contracting (PBC) entails increased financial risk for providers. Allocating and managing risk through contractual relationships along the service supply chain is a critical issue, and yet there is scant empirical evidence regarding what factors influence, and how, provider willingness to bear PBC-induced risk. This paper aims to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on agency theory and two cases of logistics service supply chains, in the food retail and automotive industries respectively, to identify key influencing factors. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 30 managers of providers and sub-contractors and review of 35 documents, notably contracts and target letters.

Findings

Four influencing factors were found: performance attributability within the service supply chain; relational governance in service supply chain relationships; provider risk and reward balancing; and provider ability to transfer risk to sub-contractors. The propositions developed address how these factors influence provider willingness to bear PBC-induced risk.

Research limitations/implications

The factors identified are external to the provider mindset and refer to the management of contractual relationships and service delivery interactions along the service supply chain. The paper contributes to agency theory by stressing the risk allocation implications of bi-directional principal-agent relations in service supply chains.

Practical implications

The study suggests ways in which providers can increase their capacity to bear and manage financial risk related to PBC design.

Originality/value

The paper identifies factors that influence provider willingness to bear financial risk induced by PBC in service supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Scott E. Sampson

Supply chains are quite easy to define for manufacturing organizations where each participant in the chain receives inputs from a set of suppliers, processes those inputs…

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7514

Abstract

Supply chains are quite easy to define for manufacturing organizations where each participant in the chain receives inputs from a set of suppliers, processes those inputs, and delivers them to a distinct set of customers. With service organizations, one of the primary suppliers of process inputs is customers themselves, who provide their bodies, minds, belongings, or information as inputs to the service processes. We refer to this concept of customers being suppliers as “customer‐supplier duality.” The duality implies that service supply chains are bidirectional, which is that production flows in both directions. This article explores the customer‐supplier duality as it pertains to supply chain management, including practical and managerial implications.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Ceren Altuntas Vural

This study aims to contribute to the scholarly fields of supply chain management (SCM) and service-dominant logic (SDL) by conducting a systematic literature review on…

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1709

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the scholarly fields of supply chain management (SCM) and service-dominant logic (SDL) by conducting a systematic literature review on business-to-business (B2B) marketing and SCM studies.

Design/methodology/approach

After the collection and refinement of 127 articles on SDL and SCM interface, descriptive and thematic analyses were applied to discover the current situation and the existing research streams in the literature.

Findings

The SDL-SCM literature focuses on five main research streams which are value co-creation and value-in-use, integration and relationship management, resource sharing, servitization and service supply chains. Each of them are explored in depth, and future research opportunities are proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited with the selected articles. Future scholarly attention to the intersection between SDL and SCM will enhance the knowledge on these fields.

Originality/value

The study contributes to both of these fields by summarizing the existing scholarly research and proposing research opportunities for scholars. It is one of the first efforts to systematically review the interface between SCM and SDL.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

William E. Youngdahl and Arvinder P.S. Loomba

Value‐added services expand manufacturing organizations’ ability to compete beyond traditional measures of manufacturing competitiveness such as cost, quality…

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5226

Abstract

Value‐added services expand manufacturing organizations’ ability to compete beyond traditional measures of manufacturing competitiveness such as cost, quality, flexibility, and delivery. This concept of expanding the roles of factories to include service has received considerable attention and wide acceptance among both researchers and practitioners. For example, recent empirical studies have demonstrated that manufacturing performance, particularly delivery performance can be enhanced through expanded service roles that focus on effective information flows within the company and to external customers. Despite such benefits, the scope of analysis has been limited to individual manufacturing organizations. Given the realities of global competition, practitioners require knowledge that extends beyond individual organizations. The domain of their problems includes the complexities of interactions with multiple stakeholders along global supply chains. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to extend the concept of the service factory to global supply chains. Specifically, the approach will be to provide a conceptualization of the role of service in global supply chain management that can be used as a starting point for discussion and further research in this area. We provide several propositions and conclude with implications for both researchers and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

James Aitken, Paul Childerhouse, Eric Deakins and Denis Towill

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and similarities between the manufacturing and services sectors in order to develop a methodology that can…

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1490

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and similarities between the manufacturing and services sectors in order to develop a methodology that can provide the opportunity for the transfer of best practice between the two sectors. This paper aims to describe an audit methodology capable of yielding objective comparisons of supply chain integration performance that can assist practitioners and academics to transfer learned solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A robust, site-based, multi-method supply chain diagnostic for detecting manufacturing supply chain system uncertainty was amended for the service sector in order to yield objective comparisons of the (normalised) supply chain integration performances of 119 organisations.

Findings

The research confirms the value of using a lens enabled by the uncertainty circle model (UCM) for generating meaningful comparative supply chain performances. The research found that services do not always exhibit unique attributes which effectively bar manufacturing-based supply chain best practice from being adopted within the service sector.

Originality/value

Combining the UCM and Quick Scan Audit Methodology approach has the potential to assist the spread of proven good practice across both sectors. The framework provides realistic and repeatable performance vectors, capable of aligning estimates of value stream health status even when comparing supply chains with differing objectives, configurations, and performance goals.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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