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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Kent D. Larson

Introduces the concept of service level agreements (SLAs) in IT service provision, especially in the case of outsourced service provision. Reports the experience of…

Abstract

Introduces the concept of service level agreements (SLAs) in IT service provision, especially in the case of outsourced service provision. Reports the experience of several consulting engagements and surveys to substantiate suggested frameworks and checklists. Discusses the reasons for exercising rigour around SLAs. Differentiates between SLAs negotiated for internal versus external service providers. Describes the structure of good service level agreements. Outlines the most important elements of measurement for monitoring service level performance. Concludes with the importance of SLAs to the management of commercial relationships in which services are provided.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

William Lehr and Lee W. McKnight

Delivering real‐time services (Internet telephony, video conferencing, and streaming media as well as business‐critical data applications) across the Internet requires…

Abstract

Delivering real‐time services (Internet telephony, video conferencing, and streaming media as well as business‐critical data applications) across the Internet requires end‐to‐end quality of service (QoS) guarantees, which requires a hierarchy of contracts. These standardized contracts may be referred to as service level agreements (SLAs). SLAs provide a mechanism for service providers and customers to flexibly specify the service to be delivered. The emergence of bandwidth and service agents, traders, brokers, exchanges and contracts can provide an institutional and business framework to support effective competition. This article identifies issues that must be addressed by SLAs for consumer applications. We introduce a simple taxonomy for classifying SLAs based on the identity of the contracting parties. We conclude by discussing implications for public policy, Internet architecture, and competition.

Details

info, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Peter Tonks and Hugh Flanagan

Explores the introduction and development of Service Level Agreements(SLAs) in relation to Human Resource Departments. Considers approachesto SLAs and highlights four…

Abstract

Explores the introduction and development of Service Level Agreements (SLAs) in relation to Human Resource Departments. Considers approaches to SLAs and highlights four dimensions necessary for the completion of an SLA. Stresses that Human Resource Specialists should have a thorough understanding of how directorates and other departments relate to one another to provide added value in terms of contribution to the organizational outcomes. Suggests the idea of adding value is an integral part of the SLA process which ensures that it operates as a means to an end and does not become an end in itself. Examines the degree of devolved freedom given to a department to seek work or sell its products outside its Trust/Unit. Scrutinizes the format of SLAs and concludes that the benefits of SLAs for users of Human Resource Departments and the benefits to the Human Resource Departments are similar.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Panos Fitsilis

The aim of this paper is to present the key areas of activity to be used for drafting service level agreements (SLAs) for electronic services and, at the same time, to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the key areas of activity to be used for drafting service level agreements (SLAs) for electronic services and, at the same time, to present best practices and problems that arise from the application of this discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of recently published (2000‐2005) works has been reviewed, in order to: a) analyse how an SLA has to be defined and applied b) identify the applicable best practices and c) identify the problem areas.

Findings

Provides guidance for the business and the Application Service Provider (ASP) when they want to engage in an outsourcing agreement by presenting best practices and problems that occur from the application of SLAs.

Research limitations/implications

Suggests further research is needed in a number of research areas such as: development of semantic models for SLAs, development of flexible pricing models in relation with SLAs, definition of SLAs in cases of dynamic service creation, etc.

Practical implications

A useful source of information both for academia and the business.

Originality/value

Provides practical insight on a specialized topic and guidance to researchers.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Russell Smith

Business continuity planning is like any other service that isprovided and, as such, justifies a service level agreement. Promotes theidea of a master service agreement as…

Abstract

Business continuity planning is like any other service that is provided and, as such, justifies a service level agreement. Promotes the idea of a master service agreement as an umbrella document for the establishment and maintenance of service level agreements.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Vasiliki Diamantopoulou and Haralambos Mouratidis

The enforcement of the General Data Protection Regulation imposes specific privacy- and -security related requirements that any organisation that processes European Union…

Abstract

Purpose

The enforcement of the General Data Protection Regulation imposes specific privacy- and -security related requirements that any organisation that processes European Union citizens’ personal data must comply with. The application of privacy- and security-by-design principles are assisting organisation in achieving compliance with the Regulation. The purpose of this study is to assist data controllers in their effort to achieve compliance with the new Regulation, by proposing the adoption of the privacy level agreement (PLA). A PLA is considered as a formal way for the data controllers and the data subjects to mutually agree the privacy settings of a service provisioned. A PLA supports privacy management, by analysing privacy threats, vulnerabilities and information systems’ trust relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

However, the concept of PLA has only been proposed on a theoretical level. To this aim, two different domains have been selected acting as real-life case studies, the public administration and the health care, where special categories of personal data are processed.

Findings

The results of the evaluation of the adoption of the PLA by the data controllers are positive. Furthermore, they indicate that the adoption of such an agreement facilitates data controllers in demonstrating transparency of their processes. Regarding data subjects, the evaluation process revealed that the use of the PLA increases trust levels on data controllers.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a novel reference architecture to enable PLA management in practice and reports on the application and evaluation of PLA management.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Arjun K. Pai and Subhajit Basu

Offshore outsourcing of non‐core business process has rapidly evolved as a ubiquitous organisational phenomenon. However, failure to follow a clear, systematic and…

Abstract

Purpose

Offshore outsourcing of non‐core business process has rapidly evolved as a ubiquitous organisational phenomenon. However, failure to follow a clear, systematic and effective outsourcing strategy to evaluate threats, uncertainties and numerous imponderables can cause global enterprise businesses major setbacks. The reasons for such setback could be largely due to lack of core competency, careful legal planning and due diligence to operating models associated with an outsourcing initiative. This paper attempts to collate and exemplify the distinct qualifying processes accommodating contractual and intellectual property rights and provide a worthwhile debate on intricate legal considerations when structuring multi‐jurisdictional outsourcing deals.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a comparative analysis of strategic legal and management framework by weighing the risks and evaluating the threats which would assist the decision making process of firms when selecting an appropriate offshore partner to carry out their IT‐development work.

Findings

Importance of legal intervention and due diligence to service agreements is further elevated as, at every phase of an outsourcing arrangement, compliance issues and contractual obligations can affect the success of an enterprise customer and its relationship with their outsourcing service provider.

Research limitations/implications

The authors suggest that an exhaustive qualitative and quantitative industry specific research analysis be conducted in order to better define the principles and standards governing sub‐contracting arrangements.

Practical implications

A broader exposure to the strategic management and regulatory framework might provide firms with vantage points from which they could assess and identify new opportunities, evaluate threats and adopt effective risk mitigation strategies. Compliance to security standards and safeguard of information acquisition, analysis and usage should emerge as the mainstream strategy for outsourcing.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights and an overview of management and legal issues in the context of offshore technology outsourcing.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Rieneke G. Berbée, Paul Gemmel, Brenda Droesbeke, Hugo Casteleyn and Darline Vandaele

The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the development and use of service level agreements (SLAs) in a Belgian hospital from a client's point of view.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the development and use of service level agreements (SLAs) in a Belgian hospital from a client's point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a theoretical framework indicating the variables that influence the relationship between the use of a specific governance mechanisms and performance, a new instrument was developed and applied on a convenience sample of 107 SLA clients from a Belgian hospital.

Findings

SLAs are useful for hospitals, as they improve people's insight into processes, stimulate people to think about performance measurement and, in some cases, also lead to improved services. The main advantages of SLAs do not really lie in improved relationships and better fits with clients' needs, but in improved process mapping and improved performance measurement. The questionnaire from this research study proves to be a useful and reliable instrument for evaluating internal SLAs from a client's point of view.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are limited, as they are only based on one Belgian institution. Other limitations include the posttest‐only research design and the unequal distribution of the respondents over the different SLAs. Recommendations for future research include applying the questionnaire in other Belgian hospitals and in settings where both a pretest and posttest can be conducted.

Originality/value

As far as known, no other studies have yet evaluated the effectiveness of SLAs in the healthcare sector. While a fairly‐substantial amount of scientific literature deals with SLAs in the world of ICT, this literature is often very specific and cannot always be applied to other service sectors.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Ian Kessler

The range of pressures which has impacted on localgovernment in the 1980s has forced the emergenceof dynamic and sophisticated forms of industrialrelations at the…

Abstract

The range of pressures which has impacted on local government in the 1980s has forced the emergence of dynamic and sophisticated forms of industrial relations at the workplace level. It is clear, however, that with conceptual tools forged to analyse developments in the private manufacturing sector, very few attempts have been made by academics, policy‐makers or commentators to discuss the structures and processes which have emerged. The character of the changes at authority level are considered using material from a survey of personnel officers in over a third of authorities in England and Wales and within the context of prevailing analytical and theoretical frameworks. It is argued that the distinctive development of the personnel function in local government has resulted in a managerial process which conforms to key features of the human resource management (HRM) model, in particular the devolution of personnel responsibilities to line managers and the integration of personnel concerns at the strategic level. However, other features of this model are less in evidence. The search for employee commitment and flexibility remains patchy and often appears as a practical response to labour market and competitive pressures. Furthermore, collectivist features of employee relations remain well entrenched with the continued encouragement of both union membership and involvement. This is not to deny change beyond the HRM model. Thus, it is clear that established joint machinery is becoming increasingly unable to deal with ongoing issues while the trade unions are gradually being forced into a consultative rather than a bargaining role.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Dilanthi Amaratunga, Richard Haigh, Marjan Sarshar and David Baldry

Describes a process to assess facilities management (FM) process capabilities: the structured process improvement for construction environments – facilities management…

Abstract

Describes a process to assess facilities management (FM) process capabilities: the structured process improvement for construction environments – facilities management (SPICE FM) approach. The SPICE FM framework is a method that FM organisations can use to monitor continuously and subsequently improve their performance. The SPICE FM framework is being tested in a series of case studies to ensure that its outputs are appropriate to the FM sector and of value in the real world. Documents the outcomes of a study undertaken at a facilities directorate of a healthcare NHS trust, in searching its applicability within the NHS. Further describes the study methodology and the key activities undertaken and reviews the key communication and management processes that are in place to support the implementation of the strategic FM objectives within the specific NHS facilities directorate.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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