Search results

1 – 10 of over 88000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Mohammadali Zolfagharian, Fuad Hasan and Pramod Iyer

The purpose of this study is to explore how service employee choice and use of language to initiate and maintain conversation with second generation immigrant customers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how service employee choice and use of language to initiate and maintain conversation with second generation immigrant customers (SGIC) influence customer evaluation of the service encounter, and whether such employee acts may lead customers to employee switching, branch switching (i.e. switching from one to another location within the same brand) and/or brand switching (switching to another brand altogether).

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario-based between-subjects experiment of 4 (employee: match, adapt, bilingual, no adapt) × 2 (fast food, post office) × 2 (English, Spanish) was used to examine the SGIC response to service encounters in different contexts arising from employee choice and use of language. These scenarios were complemented with a series of measurement scales. The instruments, which were identical except in scenario sections, were administered on 788 second-generation Mexican American customers, resulting in 271 (fast food) and 265 (post office) effective responses.

Findings

In both service contexts, when employees initiated conversation that matched (English or Spanish) the customer expectations, the SGIC perceptions of interaction quality was higher as compared to other scenarios, leading to subsequent satisfaction and lower switching intentions (employee and branch). Similarly, interaction quality was higher for adapt scenarios as compared to bilingual or no adapt scenarios. Bilingual customers perceived higher interaction quality in bilingual/no-adapt scenarios when compared to monolingual customers. In both contexts, service quality and satisfaction were associated with employee switching and branch switching, but not with brand switching.

Research limitations/implications

By utilizing interaction adaptation theory to conceptualize the effects of employee choice and use of language, the study grounds the model and the hypotheses in theoretical bases and provides empirical corroboration of the theory. The study also contributes toward understanding the service encounters from the perspective of an overlooked group of vulnerable customers: second-generation immigrants.

Practical implications

Service research cautions service providers that a key factor in attracting and retaining customers is having detailed communication guidelines and empowering employees to follow those guidelines. The findings go a step further and underscore the critical role of communication from a managerial standpoint. It is in the interest of service organizations to develop guidelines that will govern employee choice and use of language during service encounters. So doing is commercially justified because unguided employee choice and use of language can result in customer switching and attrition.

Social implications

The juxtaposition between assigned versus asserted identities is an important one not only in social sciences but also within service research. As service encounters grow increasingly multicultural, the need to educate employees on multiculturally appropriate communication etiquette rises in importance. The findings should encourage service firms and local governments to develop formal communication guidelines that begin with multiculturalism as a central tenet permeating all aspects of employee–employee, employee–customer and customer–customer communications. Service providers ought to take precautionary measures to ensure customers will be empowered to assert their identities in their own terms, if they wish so.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates how employee choice and use of language during service encounters may thwart SGIC, who might view such employee behaviors as acts of identity assignment and, consequently, feel stigmatized, marginalized and offended; and links such customer experiences to switching behavior through mediatory mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Jiyoung Kim, Sunmee Choi and Drew Martin

Applying social capital and the social exchange theories to customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions, this study aims to propose that interaction quality perceptions affect…

Abstract

Purpose

Applying social capital and the social exchange theories to customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions, this study aims to propose that interaction quality perceptions affect the customer-to-service provider’s interaction quality perceptions in a prolonged, close-proximity service setting. Examining this exogenous dimension, the study also tests socio-emotional support perception’s mediating effect and customer proactiveness’ moderating effect.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts and modifies existing general services of C2C interaction dimensions to fit the health-care context. An in-person survey of 192 neurosurgery inpatients and their care-giving companions (both considered health-care customers) provides data to validate the dimensions and test the model. Structural equation modeling and moderated regression test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results show that affirmative C2C interactions positively affect the customer’s perceived socio-emotional support, whereas negative C2C interactions show no significant impact. Greater socio-emotional support acuity improves customers’ assurance and empathy quality perceptions about the provider’s service. Customer proactiveness moderates C2C interaction dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the research of the C2C interaction to include their effect on service quality perceptions in a prolonged close-proximity service setting. Study results validate C2C interaction’s dimensions specific to an inpatient setting. Finally, this study extends the application of social capital theory and social exchange theory to C2C settings.

Practical implications

Findings emphasize the importance of managing C2C interactions during prolonged, close-proximity service delivery processes to improve customer perceptions of service quality. Results suggest that managers should monitor customer proactiveness to maximize positive C2C interactions’ positive effects while minimizing negative C2C interactions.

Originality/value

Prior service quality studies tend to focus on managing internal resources (staff, processes or physical environment); however, this study examines how the interactions among external resources create a halo effect and impact customers’ service quality perceptions. Results inform methods to improve their quality perceptions by better managing exogenous factors. The study also responds to calls for research on how C2C interactions affect functional service contexts (vs hedonic service contexts).

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Quynh Xuan Tran, My Van Dang and Nadine Tournois

This study aims to investigate the effects of servicescape on customer satisfaction and loyalty – centered on social interaction and service experience in the café setting.

Downloads
1165

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of servicescape on customer satisfaction and loyalty – centered on social interaction and service experience in the café setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected from approximately 1,800 customers at 185 coffee stores located in the three largest cities in Vietnam through the self-administered questionnaires.

Findings

The research findings pointed out the significant impacts of café servicescape on social interaction quality, including customer-to-employee interaction (CEI) and customer-to-customer interaction (CCI). Social interactions and servicescape were shown to remarkably influence customer experience quality, customer satisfaction and loyalty. Moreover, the study confirmed the interrelation between service experience, satisfaction and loyalty in the café setting.

Practical implications

This study provides marketers and service managers a deeper understanding of improving customer satisfaction and loyalty through the control of servicescape attributes and social interactions in café contexts.

Originality/value

This research explores the significant impacts of café servicescape on social interaction quality (CEI and CCI). Additionally, it provides insights within the role of social interactions to customer’s affective and behavioral responses in service settings, especially the CCI quality.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Jiaqi (Gemma) Luo, IpKin Anthony Wong, Brian King, Matthew Tingchi Liu and GuoQiong Huang

This study draws on the service-dominant (S-D) logic paradigm to examine value co-creation and co-destruction. As these phenomena are driven by positive and negative…

Downloads
2644

Abstract

Purpose

This study draws on the service-dominant (S-D) logic paradigm to examine value co-creation and co-destruction. As these phenomena are driven by positive and negative “customer-to-customer” (C2C) interactions, this paper aims to examine their influence on tourist perceptions of service quality and how they shape affective responses toward tourism and hospitality services and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a comprehensive literature review, the authors used convenience sampling to gather a large sample of tourists at Shanghai Disneyland, a recently opened and already popular international tourism attraction. Structural equation modeling was used to test for direct and moderated relationships.

Findings

The findings indicated that positive and negative C2C interactions have significant though differential impacts on customer responses. Furthermore, it was found that visitor arousal mediated the relationship between service quality and brand loyalty. Prior experience was identified as a moderator in the co-creation and co-destruction process during service encounters.

Practical implications

This paper is one of the first to examine the concept of co-destruction in the tourism and hospitality context. It contributes to the literature by demonstrating the merits of proactive service provision by tourism operators, taking account of both the co-creation and co-destruction of value.

Originality/value

The study extends the literature by taking account of both positive and negative C2C interactions when examining co-creation and co-destruction in the context of service encounters. It also contributes to knowledge by assessing the asymmetry of such interactions in the context of the customer experience.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Cheryl Ganesan‐Lim, Rebekah Russell‐Bennett and Tracey Dagger

This study aims to develop and test a service‐based demographic framework for studying service quality perceptions. Specifically, the effect of level of service contact…

Downloads
5501

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop and test a service‐based demographic framework for studying service quality perceptions. Specifically, the effect of level of service contact and key demographic variables of age, gender and income on service quality perceptions is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 224 customers of high‐ and low‐contact passenger transport services were surveyed using a self‐administered questionnaire.

Findings

The findings indicated that service quality perceptions differed according to the level of contact inherent to the service. Consumer age was also found to affect service quality perceptions; however, no differences in service quality perceptions on the basis of gender or income were found.

Research implications/limitations

The results of the study enhance the understanding of service quality perceptions and provide useful insight for the management and delivery of service quality. Overall, the results suggest that managers in the train travel industry need to take the level of contact as well as the views of certain demographic segments into account if they want to maximize perceived service. Demographics provide managers with a means of determining which segments of the market are feasible in terms of achieving greater market penetration. The findings of this study show the importance of considering variables relating to individual characteristic or the service itself when investigating service quality.

Originality/value

Prior research has not examined empirically whether service quality dimensions vary on the basis of service type; thus, this paper contributes to knowledge in this field.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2013

Beom Joon Choi and Hyun Sik Kim

Creating superior customer satisfaction has been considered one of the keys to the firm's success and hence, the antecedents of customer satisfaction have been examined…

Downloads
4635

Abstract

Purpose

Creating superior customer satisfaction has been considered one of the keys to the firm's success and hence, the antecedents of customer satisfaction have been examined numerous times. However, the link between customer satisfaction and peer‐to‐peer quality, which is deemed a critical component of customer experience quality, has not been spotlighted despite its importance. The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a theoretical model of the relationship among outcome quality, interaction quality, peer‐to‐peer quality, and customer satisfaction as well as these variables’ impacts on customer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the model, the authors conducted a survey and collected self‐administered data for data analysis. The proposed relationships were then tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings indicate that outcome quality, interaction quality, and peer‐to‐peer quality perceptions significantly influence customer satisfaction, which, in turn, greatly influences customer loyalty. This study shows that outcome quality, interaction quality, and peer‐to‐peer quality should be considered pivotal elements in creating customer satisfaction and that customer satisfaction should be treated as a strategic variable to enhance customer loyalty.

Originality/value

The present study examines the role of familiarity as a moderating variable, finding that outcome quality has a significant influence on customer satisfaction only when patients are familiar with services provided by a hospital. That is, the influence of outcome quality on customer satisfaction becomes greater as customers become more familiar with hospital services, which are characterized as credence services. The finding is noteworthy in that it expands our understanding of the relationship between outcome quality and customer satisfaction.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Su Qin, Li Zhao and Xu Yi

The paper investigates the impacts of customer‐service interactions on relationship quality in retailing services in China.

Downloads
2474

Abstract

Purpose

The paper investigates the impacts of customer‐service interactions on relationship quality in retailing services in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes a conceptual model of the relationship between the construct of “customer service” (conceptualised in terms of customers' interactions with service personnel and customers' interactions with the service environment) and the construct of relationship quality (conceptualised in terms of satisfaction, trust, and commitment). The hypothesised relationships are then tested in an empirical study with a sample of 295 retailing customers in China.

Findings

Both kinds of interactions (with service personnel and with the service environment) are shown to have a direct positive impact on relationship quality. However, the customers' interactions with the environment are found to have a greater impact than their interactions with service personnel on customers' perceptions of relationship quality. Moreover, “environment rules” (such as pricing policy and warranty) are found to be more important than “environment facilities” (ambience) in enhancing the quality of interaction between the customer and the service environment.

Research limitations/implications

The model is tested only in the Chinese retailing sector. Nevertheless, the findings provide valuable managerial implications for retail service in the Chinese market.

Practical implications

The study identifies several practical issues of interest to managers and contact personnel in the retailing industry.

Originality/value

The study incorporates the important notion of “environment rules” (such as pricing policy and warranty) to the construct of “interaction quality between customers and the service environment”. The results clearly show that such “environment rules” represent an indispensable aspect of the service environment to be taken into account when measuring the customer's interaction with the service environment.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Adenekan Dedeke

This paper proposes a different approach to, and definition of, service quality. Service quality is framed as being dependent on composite results that a service provider…

Downloads
5300

Abstract

This paper proposes a different approach to, and definition of, service quality. Service quality is framed as being dependent on composite results that a service provider and its systems offer a customer. In contrast to the approach that depicts service quality as a discrepancy construct, this paper frames the concept as a fulfilment‐oriented construct. The premise of the paper is that each services sector should have service quality criteria that specifically fit its features and characteristics. To implement a context‐dependent services quality instrument, it is argued that managers could use a service quality grid to classify firms according to their outcomes and dominant service‐encounter interactions. Three kinds of dominant interactions are introduced: customer‐to‐staff, customer‐to‐technology, and customer‐to‐product/services. Three central recommendations are proposed. First, it is important for managers to define their services in terms of the dominant service interactions. Second, managers should develop their servicequality instruments around the dominant interactions of their particular sector. Third, managers should develop servicequality question items using the paired criteria approach to capture customer experiences during service interactions.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Emerson Wagner Mainardes, Carlos Anderson de Moura Rosa and Silvania Neris Nossa

Supported by the omnichannel strategy, the objective of this study is to identify the influence of integrated interaction quality and perceived fluency of service channels…

Downloads
1441

Abstract

Purpose

Supported by the omnichannel strategy, the objective of this study is to identify the influence of integrated interaction quality and perceived fluency of service channels on attitudinal loyalty in the banking sector and to test the mediating effect of positive affect in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a model that relates the constructs of integrated interaction quality, perceived fluency, positive affect, and attitudinal loyalty. A survey of 337 Brazilian bank clients was conducted and structural equation modeling was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that the construct of integrated interaction quality exerts positive influence on the loyalty of bank clients. The direct effect of the construct perceived fluency on loyalty is not significant. The results also demonstrate that positive affect exerts a mediating effect on the proposed relationships between the constructs.

Research limitations/implications

This research assists banks in identifying relevant points regarding their service channels, so that they can determine how to generate positive experiences and customer loyalty through an omnichannel strategy. One can observe the behavior of banking consumers and develop business strategies based on the service channels, which aim to create a more profitable and loyal customer portfolio.

Originality/value

This study expands the literature regarding the omnichannel strategy by extending focus to include bank marketing, which is infrequently included in the body of such literature. This study also expands bank marketing research by including constructs that deal with consumer experience and loyalty.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Hardeep Chahal and Neetu Kumari

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically validate a multidimensional scale for measuring healthcare service quality (HCSQ), based on modified Brady and…

Downloads
1002

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically validate a multidimensional scale for measuring healthcare service quality (HCSQ), based on modified Brady and Cronin's hierarchical service quality model. The study also investigated HCSQ and its ability to predict important service outcomes through two different models. In the first model, direct effects of service quality dimensions, namely physical environment quality (comprising ambient condition, social factor and tangibles), interaction quality (comprising attitude and behaviour, expertise and process quality) and outcome quality (comprising waiting time, patient satisfaction and loyalty) on image are measured. In the second model, direct effects of physical environment quality (comprising ambient condition, social factor and tangibles), interaction quality (comprising attitude and behaviour, expertise and process quality) on service quality through outcome quality (comprising waiting time, patient satisfaction and loyalty) are measured.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 400 indoor patients of five departments', namely general medicine, surgery, pediatrics, orthopedics and gynecology and ENT of a tertiary public hospital of North India using stratified sampling.

Findings

The study supports both the models for measuring HCSQ. Structural equational modelling is used to test the hypotheses relating to direct and indirect effects in the two models.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitations of the study include selection of only inpatients and use of non‐financial performance measures.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the development of multiple dimensional holistical service quality models in the healthcare sector.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 88000