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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Estrella Díaz, David Martín-Consuegra and Águeda Esteban

The purpose of this paper is to analyze perceptions of service cannibalization from sales agents when faced with increased online sales, and their consequences on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze perceptions of service cannibalization from sales agents when faced with increased online sales, and their consequences on the employee. The authors assess the effect of service cannibalization perceptions on insecurity, satisfaction, alienation, sales agents’ effort. The study also examines relationships between effects on sales agents’ service sabotage during service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 497 travel agency sales agents, and structural equation modeling was used to examine hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results suggest that sales agents’ perceptions of service cannibalization influence employees, and have repercussions regarding service sabotage.

Research limitations/implications

Mediators were not tested, and the model does not capture the phenomenon’s complexity. This study reinforces the importance of capturing sales agents’ perceptions from travel agency managers in reducing negative consequences on employees, which is particularly important given multichannel marketing when online marketing channels coexist with traditional sales forces.

Practical implications

This study offers insights to firms regarding perceived cannibalization and its consequences on sales agents’ motivation. Organizations should find ways to minimize insecurity, dissatisfaction, and alienation.

Originality/value

This study examines psychological influences of the addition of an internet channel on sales agents’ job-related outcomes, and its relationship with sales agents’ service sabotage during service delivery.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Niels Peter Mols

Explores why some retail banks more than others are vigorous in their promotion of and have been successful in changing their distribution channel structure by introducing…

Abstract

Explores why some retail banks more than others are vigorous in their promotion of and have been successful in changing their distribution channel structure by introducing new electronic channels, such as PC banking and Internet banking. A tentative model is proposed relating a number of variables to the banks’ promotion and successful introduction of the electronic channels. Responses from 60 key managers in the largest retail banks in Denmark indicate that bank size, expected advantages for the customers, attention to the future, senior management support, and willingness to cannibalize existing channels may be important factors in explaining the successful introduction of the electronic channels. Further, the results indicate that different attitudes and perceptions are related to different means of attracting customers to the electronic channels. Finally, discusses the implications for the banks and other firms of adopting the Internet as a distribution channel.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Anup Krishnamurthy and G. Shainesh

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of an additional service on existing consumers’ usage of existing services from the same service provider. Research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of an additional service on existing consumers’ usage of existing services from the same service provider. Research has often focused on marketers’ efforts to sell new offerings to existing customers. However, does the consumption of these new offerings by existing customers affect their usage of the firm’s existing services? This research examines this question in the context of a subscription service.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses matched consumer- and firm-level data from a leading telecom service provider in India. These data include responses from 230 consumers, as well as details on their usage of existing and additional services. The data are analyzed using three-stage least squares regressions while controlling for consumers’ past usage of the existing services.

Findings

The results indicate that existing consumers’ cross-buying of the new service results in a reduction of their future usage of existing services. Most consumers also managed to maintain their monthly payments constant, even though they had subscribed to the new service. Together, these findings imply that consumers reallocate their budget by reducing their usage of existing services to accommodate the usage of an additional service from the same service provider. Consequently, the revenue of the firm might not always increase when the consumer cross-buys an additional service from the firm.

Originality/value

Marketing research on cross-buying has so far neglected to look at the effects of existing consumers’ adoption of an additional service on existing services of the service provider. This study focused on this gap in knowledge, in the context of subscription services. Using consumers’ perceptions and matched service usage data, the authors extend the literature that tries to understand why cross-buying may not be beneficial to the firm in certain service settings.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Ana Cristina Paixão and Peter Bernard Marlow

Since the Second World War, ports have been going through an evolution which the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) refers to as generations. The…

Abstract

Since the Second World War, ports have been going through an evolution which the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) refers to as generations. The generation of a port reflects whether the approach adopted by port authorities/operators in developing their activities is likely to be reactive or proactive. These activities start with the traditional ones (cargo loading and discharging) and end up with the establishment of a wide range of logistics and value‐added activities, developed in conjunction with industrial and commercial businesses. This generation of ports, classified as third generation, would be sufficient if the world economic growth pattern could be forecast with any certainty. Unfortunately, this is not the case and the external environment today comprises constant changes that are reflected in the high levels of market uncertainty. To cope with this uncertainty it is suggested that ports should adopt a new logistics approach, agility, which has already been employed in other industries. This paper provides a definition of fourth generation ports and a methodology for implementing the concept of agile ports.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Spiros P. Gounaris, Paulina G. Papastathopoulou and George J. Avlonitis

This article reports on the results of a research project into the development activities undertaken during the launch of 132 new financial services in Greece. According…

Abstract

This article reports on the results of a research project into the development activities undertaken during the launch of 132 new financial services in Greece. According to the results, business analysis and marketing strategy formation as well as launch are the stages of the new service development process which influence the success of a new service irrespective, for the most part, of the degree of innovativeness that characterizes it. The significance of the other three stages of the development process varies depending the degree of innovativeness that characterizes the new service and the type of objective (financial or not) that management considers in order to evaluate its actual performance.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Nelson Oly Ndubisi and Celine Marie Capel

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Mikael Hernant, Thomas Andersson and Olli‐Pekka Hilmola

The purpose of this study is to describe the determinants of profitability in terms of the strategic profitability model (the Du Pont model), depicting the “route” to high…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe the determinants of profitability in terms of the strategic profitability model (the Du Pont model), depicting the “route” to high profitability in grocery retail stores located in market areas possessing dissimilar competitive conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Different physical characteristics (e.g. store formats) have traditionally been used as control criteria, but it is argued in this paper that management principles in retail chains should be based on different clusters of stores, formed from local competitive conditions. The paper proposes a clustering method based on five indicators of local competition. The research results are derived from local competitive conditions and the performance of 168 supermarkets, located in Sweden, and controlled by one retail chain.

Findings

The paper identifies four clusters of local markets labeled monopoly, fleet market, venue, and duopoly, based on local competitive conditions. The findings show that the “route” to profitability significantly differs between the clusters. In monopoly the route to high profitability goes through high‐gross margin, while in fleet market the key figures are low cost, large number of shoppers per week, and high productivity. Venue and duopoly both gain from high‐average transactions per shopper.

Practical implications

Supermarkets under different competitive conditions have different critical success factors and would probably be better managed, supported and evaluated on a different basis, i.e. retail chains need to adjust their approach to their supermarkets depending on local competitive conditions.

Originality/value

Based on the findings the paper proposes unique management strategies for different clusters of local markets to further enhance current strength areas.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Navin K. Dev and Ravi Shankar

The modern business community understands the importance of long-term satisfaction of consumer. Enabling the consumer to return products is a significant part of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The modern business community understands the importance of long-term satisfaction of consumer. Enabling the consumer to return products is a significant part of the equation. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the sustainable boundaries in terms of their relationship toward greening a supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Using interpretive structural modeling the research presents a hierarchy-based model to realize the driving power and dependence of sustainable boundary enablers.

Findings

The research shows that there exists a group of enablers having a high driving power and low dependence requiring maximum attention and of strategic importance while another group consists of those variables which have high dependence and are the resultant actions.

Practical implications

This classification provides a useful tool to supply chain managers to differentiate between independent and dependent variables and their mutual relationships which would help them to focus while making strategic, tactical or operational decisions as and when required while designing a green supply chain.

Originality/value

This research assumes importance in context of greening a supply chain when globally enterprises are getting a lot of pressure from consumers as well as the regulatory measures from the government. Sustainability demands that the resources be used in lean manner through information coordination with all partners in a supply chain. The findings of this study would help delineate those variables that should to be necessarily considered to design a sustainable supply chain.

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Po-Yi Hsu, Edward C.S. Ku, Tzu-Ching Lai and Shih–Chieh Hsu

This study investigated how customer orientation and relationships influenced relational benefits via employees' attitudes toward travel agencies and partnership management.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated how customer orientation and relationships influenced relational benefits via employees' attitudes toward travel agencies and partnership management.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey questionnaires were mailed to experts of travel agencies in Taiwan. The hypothesis of this study was tested and used a research model characterized by the SEM-PLS approach.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that the travel service involves a wide range of firms, regardless of internal or external partner management, and to develop the Muslim tourism market sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

From a theoretical perspective, it was found that customer orientation of travel agencies and relationship selling among travel agencies affects partnership management of travel agencies and their employees' attitudes, which were positively associated with the relational benefit of travel agencies.

Practical implications

Travel agencies must maintain continuous collaborative relationships to ensure the sustainable development of the Muslim tourism market.

Originality/value

This study provides a meaningful model for investigating the trend and tourism products of the Muslim tourism market regarding collaboration between travel agencies and partners.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

María Fuentes-Blasco, Beatriz Moliner-Velázquez and Irene Gil-Saura

In tourism, the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (hereinafter ICT) and variables concerning firms’ links with suppliers have been recognized as key…

Abstract

Purpose

In tourism, the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (hereinafter ICT) and variables concerning firms’ links with suppliers have been recognized as key determinants to improve companies’ competitiveness. From the perspective of efficient management of company resources, segmentation has become a key tool and is particularly significant and current in the business-to-business context. The purpose of this paper is to study the segmentation of firms in the tourist industry according to perceived ICT use and relationship value and benefits. In addition, from the management approach, the authors seek to describe the segments that enable the development of differentiated strategies aimed at consolidating relationship benefits in the long term.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 310 travel agencies who evaluated the relationship with their main supplier, the authors attempt to examine the utility of these variables as segmentation criteria for identifying heterogeneous groups.

Findings

The estimation of a finite mixture model suggests that these bases are able to discriminate firms into four latent segments with different levels of ICT use and relationship variables.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the understanding of the role that ICT and relationship variables have in the segmentation processes of tourism companies. Literature on segmentation in the business-to-business (B2B) context is limited and it is hard to find studies which apply latent methodology using behavioral criteria related to the use of ICT and relationship variables.

Practical implications

Segmentation of the tourism organizational market based on valuations of supplier relations and ICT use can help suppliers to design or adapt differentiation marketing strategies. Since agencies place the most value on confidence and value, tourism service suppliers should focus their efforts on improving the elements of service provision that increase perceived trust/confidence and value (i.e. growing the number of contacts, proximity to customers or sincerity, etc.). If agencies feel they can rely more on their providers, they will value their relationship more positively thereby favoring its long-term continuity.

Originality/value

The novelty in this work lies in the application of latent segmentation methodology and the simultaneous use of bases associated with ICT and relationship variables in B2B tourism.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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