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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

K Kotiadis, G Carpenter and M Mackenzie

This paper demonstrates how a single assessment tool can be linked to intermediate care services eligibility criteria to examine referrals and admissions to these services

Abstract

This paper demonstrates how a single assessment tool can be linked to intermediate care services eligibility criteria to examine referrals and admissions to these services, by reporting on a project in a locality in East Kent. The project involved implementing a standardised patient assessment tool for three months in all intermediate care services, to examine the suitability of patients entering each of these intermediate care services. This paper focuses on the results of the community assessment rehabilitation team (CART), a recuperative care centre and the day hospital. After analysing patient assessments, we found that some patients in all intermediate care services were placed there inappropriately, and this was most evident in the day hospital. The paper concludes with considerations and suggestions for improving the effectiveness of assessment tools in practice.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Stewart Lawrence and Manzurul Alam

Looks at New Zealand’s provision for the disabled. Reports on evidence from observation of the actual assessment process. Empirical data are used about the perceptions of…

Abstract

Looks at New Zealand’s provision for the disabled. Reports on evidence from observation of the actual assessment process. Empirical data are used about the perceptions of both the assessors and the clients. Determines whether the stated aims of government policy are achieved. Appears that assessment is now fairer and provides for greater dignity and choice for clients. However, there is still room for improvement.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Liangzhi Yu, Qiulan Hong, Song Gu and Yazun Wang

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the epistemological underpinning of SERVQUAL and its limitations; and second, to propose ways to enhance the…

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4019

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the epistemological underpinning of SERVQUAL and its limitations; and second, to propose ways to enhance the utility of SERVQUAL as a library assessment tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The study first conceptualises quality judgment as a knowing process and locates the epistemological stance of SERVQUAL within the general framework of epistemology demarcation; it then examines related SERVQUAL assumptions and their implications for library assessment in general and for service quality assessment in particular based on two empirical investigations: a questionnaire survey and an interview survey. The questionnaire survey applies the SERVQUAL instrument to three Chinese university libraries, with a view to examining the SERVQUAL score in light of epistemological considerations; the interview survey interviews 50 faculty users in one of the three universities with a view to illuminating the naturalistic process through which users develop their judgement of the library's service quality and through which the SERVQUAL score is formed.

Findings

The study shows that the actual SERVQUAL score is distributed in a very scattered manner in all three libraries, and that it is formed through a very complex process rooted primarily in the user's personal experiences with the library, which are in turn shaped by factors from both the library world and the user's life‐world. Based on these findings, this research questions a number of SERVQUAL assumptions and proposes three concepts which may help to contextualise the SERVQUAL score and enhance its utility in actual library assessment: library planning based variance of user perception, perception‐dependent user expectation and library‐sophistication based user differentiation.

Originality/value

The research presented in the paper questions a number of SERVQUAL assumptions and proposes three concepts that may help to contextualise the SERVQUAL score and enhance its utility in actual library assessment.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Emile Gardner and Sean Slater

This paper aims to describe three dementia assessment services for people with intellectual disabilities to provide professionals with insight into planning this type of service.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe three dementia assessment services for people with intellectual disabilities to provide professionals with insight into planning this type of service.

Design/methodology/approach

Three services in England were contacted via email and telephone to collect data on their service provision. They were asked about the average age of individuals when receiving a baseline assessment, frequency of follow-up assessment, assessment instruments used and descriptive aspects of their services.

Findings

All three services offered proactive dementia assessment services to people with Down's syndrome (DS), with one service providing systematic screening via the GP. None offered proactive screening to people with intellectual disabilities who did not have a diagnosis of DS. All offered reactive assessment to this population if they experienced a decline in function. Services differed in terms of age at which baseline assessments were offered, frequency of follow-up and instruments used.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to compare dementia assessment provision between different services in England.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2015

Chris A. Sweigart and Lauren L. Evanovich

There is a concerning disparity between students with disabilities and their peers without disabilities in their long-term, postsecondary outcomes. The former group tends…

Abstract

There is a concerning disparity between students with disabilities and their peers without disabilities in their long-term, postsecondary outcomes. The former group tends to have a variety of poorer outcomes in important domains of life, such as employment, postsecondary education, independent living, and community participation. Policymakers, scholars, and the general public alike have called attention to this issue, resulting in both legal mandates and research on evidence-based practices in the area of transition services. While the law requires individualized, results-oriented transition services based upon age-appropriate transition assessment and a number of evidence-based transition practices and predictors have been identified, studies of individualized education programs and practices have revealed a significant underuse of best practices in transition assessment and services. In this chapter, we discuss the importance of comprehensive transition assessment as a foundation for setting postsecondary goals and designing services that best fit individual student strengths and needs and best prepare students to be successful in their adult lives. Further, we provide an overview of current recommendations for best practices in planning, conducting, and interpreting transition assessments, and offer suggestions for areas where further research is needed.

Details

Transition of Youth and Young Adults
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-933-2

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Jean E. McLaughlin

This paper aims to survey the published journal literature on reference transaction assessment. Its purpose is to highlight the need for a multiple perspectives approach…

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2237

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to survey the published journal literature on reference transaction assessment. Its purpose is to highlight the need for a multiple perspectives approach due to the complexity of reference transactions. Satisfaction indicators, behavioral aspects, accuracy rates, success measures, and other desired transaction outcomes contribute to the need for a broader assessment picture.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a review from the first decade of the twenty‐first century. Selected were papers from 2001 through 2010, filtered from search results from library literature databases. Primary inclusion criteria identified refereed papers, studies of academic library populations, evaluation or assessment of reference transactions, and methods contributing to systematic practices versus unique assessment events.

Findings

By viewing reference transactions as complex interactions, librarians are recognizing that simple counts and narrow views of assessment are not adequate. Missing in the assessment literature is a universally accepted set of standard approaches, study methodologies, and reporting formats for comparison and analysis. Improvements may contribute to efforts that go beyond local studies to more meaningful peer comparisons.

Research limitations/implications

Although not an exhaustive representation of all reference services assessment literature, the paper profiles the heart of reference, i.e. the interaction between users and library service providers. This focus fosters a concentration on a core reference activity: addressing library users' information needs.

Originality/value

This review highlights assessment challenges, unresolved problems, and topics addressed from 2001 to 2010. It also provides a look at tools that can enhance assessment programs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Joy Wales and Steven Pryjmachuk

In the UK, there are around 1.5 million carers of people with mental health problems providing substantial amounts of free care. Despite having a legal right to a ‘carer's…

Abstract

In the UK, there are around 1.5 million carers of people with mental health problems providing substantial amounts of free care. Despite having a legal right to a ‘carer's assessment’, only a minority of mental health carers have had such an assessment. To try and understand why the uptake is so low, we undertook a small (n = 8) qualitative study exploring what mental health staff acting as ‘care co‐ordinators’ thought the barriers to, and facilitators of, carers' assessments might be, and how subsequent practice might be improved.We found that there was some confusion over the definition of ‘carer’ and over who should take responsibility for carer assessments. The main barriers to carers' assessments were the documentation used, the attitudes of staff (especially managers) and the fact that the needs of mental health carers often differed from those caring for people with a physical disability. Practice could be improved through: clarifying the definition of ‘carer’; education and training; redesigning the documentation; dovetailing service user and carer needs assessments; and through offering a wider choice of evidence‐based services as assessment outcomes. Improvements are unlikely to be successful, however, without the active support, expertise and engagement of carers.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Juan José Tarí

The purpose of this paper is to study the EFQM model self‐assessment in a Spanish university.

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3084

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the EFQM model self‐assessment in a Spanish university.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology is used based on five services provided by a public university in Spain.

Findings

The findings show the steps that one university can follow in order to apply this exercise in a successful manner, its benefits, its obstacles and its key factors such as management and employee commitment, and the support to self‐assessment teams (e.g. training, review).

Originality/value

The paper provides lessons for managers from other universities who wish to develop a self‐assessment exercise.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Zeynep Tatli, Nursel Uğur and Ünal Çakiroğlu

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the contribution of the digital storytelling to the peer assessments experiences of pre-service teachers within the teaching practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the contribution of the digital storytelling to the peer assessments experiences of pre-service teachers within the teaching practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is carried out as a special case study. Both qualitative and quantitative data gathering tools were used together to investigate a special case in depth (Yıldırım and Şimşek, 2011; Çepni, 2007). In this study, the case investigated was the process whereby the senior year pre-service teachers enrolled in the faculty of education provided assessments of themselves and their peers through the teaching practice course, using digital storytelling. The contributions of the assessment method employed, in the experiences and personal development of the pre-service teachers, were investigated through interviews with pre-service teachers involved.

Findings

The results suggested that pre-service teachers’ perspectives were quite positive toward the use of digital storytelling for peer assessment in their teaching practices. The prominent contributions were: they caused easily tolerate personally as they did not take a direct form, and that they considered peer assessment through digital storytelling as an alternative means of assessment to effectively reflect the process. Receiving more detailed feedback about their classroom experiences and their teaching skills was helpful for pre-service IT teachers. Suggestions due to the findings were also included.

Originality/value

In the study, peer assessment digital stories in the teaching practice courses offers the benefits of confidence with, different perspectives, satisfaction, and objectivity. These benefits can help pre-service teachers to focus on shortcomings regarding their teaching experiences, and take care for the correction. Further studies can be provided about the digital storytelling processes in various assessment processes of the instructions to reveal the potential of digital narratives in other domains as well.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Steve Morgan

Suggests that although much was written during the 1980s onperformance assessment in the public services sector, very littlewas published about the performance assesment…

Abstract

Suggests that although much was written during the 1980s on performance assessment in the public services sector, very little was published about the performance assesment actually taking place in higher education libraries with regard to reader services. Reports on research which aims therefore, to ascertain the commitment of institutions and their libraries to performance assesment, the nature and extent of assessment of three library reader services – document delivery, enquiry services and education – and the dissemination of results and ability to gauge satisfaction levels of library managers with current assessment procedures. A postal survey was carried out during the summer 1992. Results indicated that of those surveyed around one in three libraries, 15 per cent of libraries carried out no assessment of their reader services and last only one‐third of library managers felt satisfied with their performance assessment procedures.

Details

Library Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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