Search results

1 – 10 of over 12000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sudarmo, Pratiwi Dwi Suhartanti and Wahyu Eko Prasetyanto

This study aims to determine the relationship between servant leadership, innovation self-efficacy, corporate work culture and employee productivity in mediating and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the relationship between servant leadership, innovation self-efficacy, corporate work culture and employee productivity in mediating and moderating role.

Design/methodology/approach

The research sample was 72 supervisors and 576 employees from 72 food and beverage small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in three major cities in Indonesia. SPSS and AMOS were used to test the research hypothesis using the hierarchical regression analysis test.

Findings

The results show that there was a positive and significant effect between servant leadership on innovation self-efficacy and employee productivity. Innovation self-efficacy mediates the relationship between servant leadership and employee productivity. Corporate work culture moderated the relationship between innovation self-efficacy and employee productivity.

Research limitations/implications

Future research with larger samples are needed to determine the relationship between servant leadership, innovation self-efficacy, corporate work culture and employee productivity more clearly not only on food and beverage SMEs but also on other industries. Future research needs to be carried out using experimental and longitudinal research designs.

Practical implications

There are three important practical implications based on the findings of this study. First, the results of the study provide new ideas for SME managers on how to increase the productivity of their employees, by using servant leadership which is known to be the main driver for innovation self-efficacy behavior. Second, the mediating role of innovation self-efficacy requires managers to build employee self-efficacy behavior, share more power with employees and make employees more involved in decision-making, which in turn can increase employee confidence and motivation, and their productivity. Finally, managers must realize the need to create a productive work culture in the company, by taking various actions, such as giving rewards to productive employees, making clear regulations on the company regarding working hours and company targets, and must pay attention and respect the employee's views and opinions to improve employee identification of their leaders.

Originality/value

This is the first study to build and examine the direct and indirect relationship (mediating and moderating role) between servant leadership, innovation self-efficacy, corporate work culture and employee productivity in food and beverage SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Larry Spears

Explains that servant‐leadership is a leadership term and philosophy which was originated by Robert K. Greenleaf, and which puts serving the greater needs of others as the…

Abstract

Explains that servant‐leadership is a leadership term and philosophy which was originated by Robert K. Greenleaf, and which puts serving the greater needs of others as the primary goal of leadership. In a ground‐breaking 1970 essay, entitled The Servant as Leader, Robert Greenleaf suggested how caring for our many institutions, and each other, can occur through the practice of servant‐leadership. In the 1980s and 1990s servant‐leadership has become a major focus and goal in leadership and management writings, and in organizational practice.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sunil P. Omanwar and Rakesh Kumar Agrawal

This paper aims to study the relationship between servant leadership (SL), employee turnover intention (TI) and organizational identification (OI) in hospitals.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the relationship between servant leadership (SL), employee turnover intention (TI) and organizational identification (OI) in hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a quantitative approach to investigate the relationships between SL, OI and TI, using data collected from a sample of 266 front-facing employees in a private Indian hospital setup. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze the data and test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal that servant leadership has a positive relationship with organizational identification and negatively impacts turnover intentions of the front-facing employee. Further, the study also reveals, contrary to expectations, organizational identification has no significant mediating effect between servant leadership and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to front-facing employees in hospitals and the study may be extended to other industries in the service sector. Future studies may consider other mediating and moderating variables to fully understand the mechanism of impact of servant leadership on turnover intention. Multi-level studies can also be carried out.

Practical implications

With the ever-increasing expectations for better patient care, robust leadership models have required that address front-facing employee’s well-being, enabling their attention toward patients. This paper provides the impetus for the development and adoption of servant leadership specifically within hospitals and the service sector.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies that empirically examines servant leadership in the health-care domain. The study also contributes to the extant literature on servant leadership by empirically examining the mediation effect of organizational identification between SL and TI. To the authors’ best of knowledge, this study may be the first of its kind, providing evidence of servant leadership’s impact on turnover intention and organizational identification in hospitals using data from the Indian context.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Inam Ul Haq, Usman Raja, Imtiaz Alam, Dirk De Clercq and Sharjeel Saleem

With a foundation in social exchange theory, this study examines the relationship between servant leadership and three types of workplace mistreatment – bullying…

Abstract

Purpose

With a foundation in social exchange theory, this study examines the relationship between servant leadership and three types of workplace mistreatment – bullying, incivility and ostracism – while also considering a mediating role of trust in the leader and a moderating role of the ethical climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Three time-lagged sets of data (N = 431) were collected among employees working in various sectors.

Findings

Servant leadership relates significantly to trust in the leader, as well as to workplace bullying, incivility and ostracism. In turn, trust in the leader mediates the relationship between servant leadership and all three types of workplace mistreatment. The results also indicate the presence of moderated mediation, in that the indirect effect of servant leadership on workplace mistreatment is moderated by the ethical climate.

Originality/value

This study adds to extant research by examining the mediating mechanism of trust in leaders with servant leadership and workplace mistreatment, along with interactive effects of ethical climate.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Muhammad Mumtaz Khan, Muhammad Shujaat Mubarik, Tahir Islam, Asif Rehman, Syed Saad Ahmed, Essa Khan and Farhan Sohail

The study aims to examine the mediating role of psychological empowerment and job crafting between servant leadership and innovative work behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the mediating role of psychological empowerment and job crafting between servant leadership and innovative work behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 689 knowledge workers employed in Pakistan's service industry. The data collection was done through survey design. The data analysis was done through structural equation modeling using PLS-Smart.

Findings

Servant leadership was found to be related to psychological empowerment, job crafting and innovative work behavior of the employees. Job crafting was found to be mediating between servant leadership and innovative work behavior. Additionally, psychological empowerment and job crafting were found to be sequential mediators between servant leadership and innovative work behavior.

Originality/value

The study delineated the link mechanism between servant leadership and innovative work behavior.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Yan Li, Khalid Mehmood, Xiaoyuan Zhang and Corene M. Crossin

This chapter provides a multilevel perspective on the impact of leaders’ emotional display and control on subordinates’ job satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a multilevel perspective on the impact of leaders’ emotional display and control on subordinates’ job satisfaction.

Design

This multilevel study investigates how the association of employees’ perceived immediate leaders’ servant leadership and their job satisfaction is influenced by leaders’ emotional labor. Participants in this study included 180 employees and 40 immediate leaders from 40 groups across 16 firms. To avoid of common methods of variances, multiple ratings were employed. Servant leadership of immediate team leaders and subordinates’ job satisfaction were rated by subordinates.

Findings

The results showed the positive relationship between perceived team leaders’ creating value for community (one dimension of servant leadership) and team members’ job satisfaction is strengthened by an increase in leaders’ deep-acting of emotions, but is decreased with an increase in leaders’ surface-acting and expression of naturally felt emotions.

Research Implications

This study confirms that a team leader’s emotional labor is likely to affect team members’ job satisfaction, which is also related to employees’ perceived servant leadership. Although how leaders display their emotions in organizations has a significant influence on the association between leaders’ creating value for community and subordinates’ job satisfaction, this study did not identify the explicit mechanisms to explain why this happens.

Practical Implications

These findings will enrich the practice of leaders’ emotional management in organizations.

Originality/Value

This chapter is the first to provide a perspective to understand leaders’ emotional labor from cross-level analysis. This study also extends our understandings of the effects of servant leadership and its relationships with subordinates’ job satisfaction through an exploration of each dimension of servant leadership on job satisfaction rather than relying on an overall measure servant leadership.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Mette Frisk Jensen

The Scandinavian states are universally seen as very well-functioning bureaucracies with some of the lowest levels of corruption in the world. In scholarly debates on…

Abstract

The Scandinavian states are universally seen as very well-functioning bureaucracies with some of the lowest levels of corruption in the world. In scholarly debates on state building, Francis Fukuyama has used the Scandinavian countries and the phrase ‘getting to Denmark’ as a metaphor for the apparent mystery of how states can come to be governed by well-developed bureaucracies and highly functioning state institutions. This chapter presents a study of state institutions and bureaucracy in Denmark–Norway and Sweden over a 250-year period from the mid-seventeenth to the end of the nineteenth century. The study demonstrates how bureaucracies conforming to Weber’s later model were gradually established in the Scandinavian monarchies in this period. The chapter also presents the results of three empirical studies of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, which indicate how the level of corruption in the state administration had been limited by the middle of the nineteenth century. In Denmark, the institutional framework set up after the establishment of the absolute monarchy in 1660, along with continuing reforms to improve the administration in the period of absolutism between 1660 and 1849, came to form an important basis for an administrative culture based on the rule of law. In Sweden the rule shifted between absolutism and constitutionalism, but both the Danish–Norwegian and the Swedish monarchies saw the establishment of strong and comprehensive state hierarchies with a king at the top level who set out to guarantee the rule of law and attempted to be merciful to his subjects. Lutheranism played a decisive and durable role as moral backbone in Scandinavian societies and in the establishment of a shared political culture. These elements, in combination with the establishment of Weberian-type bureaucracy, had, by the end of the nineteenth century, worked to limit corruption in the state administration of the Scandinavian countries.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Jian-Min Sun and Biying Wang

This article verified the construct of servant leadership and validated a measure developed in Western culture. Results from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (N=285…

Abstract

This article verified the construct of servant leadership and validated a measure developed in Western culture. Results from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (N=285) produced a five-factor model – altruistic calling, emotional healing, persuasive mapping, wisdom, and community stewardship with less items than the original measure. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) (N=304) indicated that the 5-factor servant leadership model fits the data best. Correlation analysis of the supervisor-subordinate paired sample (N=209 dyads) showed that servant leadership has more common features with transformational leadership and less with paternalistic leadership; the predictive power of servant leadership was roughly equivalent to that of transformational leadership but higher than that of paternalistic leadership when predicting criterion variables such as overall satisfaction and deviance behavior. Our results totally demonstrated that the revised servant leadership scale in Chinese culture has higher reliability and validity, which could be used for subsequent studies as an effective instrument.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-256-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Thomas Lopdrup-Hjorth and Anne Roelsgaard Obling

In this chapter, we contextualise an ethical codex introduced in the Danish Central Administration. As a management tool, the codex is intended to curb a mounting distrust…

Abstract

In this chapter, we contextualise an ethical codex introduced in the Danish Central Administration. As a management tool, the codex is intended to curb a mounting distrust induced by a number of political-administrative scandals. This is attempted via a revitalisation of classical bureaucratic duties. At the same time, the codex’s attempt at restoring trust is challenged by a number of obstacles. Launching our exploration from an ethos of office-perspective, we contextualise the codex in three dimensions: an organisational dimension, a semantic dimension and a training dimension. From this three-pronged analysis, we show how a number of historical and contemporary obstacles work counter to the codex’s stated attempt to revitalise the ethos of the civil servants. Building on these analyses, we discuss the tensions between official and private selves in particular ethical training exercises as well as the implications the codex brings with it, including a possible obscuring of political-administrative responsibility.

Details

Bureaucracy and Society in Transition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-283-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Bill Flint and Megan Grayce

This chapter presents the origin of the theoretical framework of servant leadership proposed by Robert Greenleaf. This brief history is followed up by an examination of…

Abstract

This chapter presents the origin of the theoretical framework of servant leadership proposed by Robert Greenleaf. This brief history is followed up by an examination of empirical studies on the key elements of a servant leader and a conceptual model of servant leadership. In addition, this chapter explores the effectiveness of servant leadership in various international contexts based on the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness Research Programs (GLOBE) humane construct. Finally, the authors use continuous improvements programs as a process to analyze how servant leadership may help the successful implementation of continuous change.

Details

Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

1 – 10 of over 12000