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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Donia Waseem, Sergio Biggemann and Tony Garry

This paper aims to explore the drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation. Specifically, it enhances the understanding of social and contextual…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation. Specifically, it enhances the understanding of social and contextual elements that contribute towards the co-creation of value.

Design/methodology/approach

Embracing an interpretive paradigm, the study draws on 57 in-depth interviews together with participant observation field notes. The data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings identify six key drivers that motivate employees to facilitate value co-creation: rewards and recognition, opportunities for life-long learning, interpersonal engagement, role responsibility and accountability, organisational vision and social purpose.

Research limitations/implications

This study is undertaken within a traditional organisation setting. Other organisational contexts such as working from home should also be considered. Second, this study focused on the individual relational orientations of employees. Also, there is an opportunity to explore the collective orientation of employees.

Originality/value

Drawing on service-dominant logic (S-D logic) as a theoretical lens, this study adopts and adapts Lindenberg and Steg’s (2013) goal-framing theory to conceptualise six drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation within three-goal frames that leads to in-role and extra-role job performance.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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314

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Sergio Biggemann, Martin Williams and Gunn Kro

This paper aims to address the question of how value can be created through social responsibility programs or other means, so that sustainability is achieved through…

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3770

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the question of how value can be created through social responsibility programs or other means, so that sustainability is achieved through increasing stakeholders' participation in the process of design and selection of such programs, so that transparency is maximised and trust can be built with the lasting benefits of co-creation of value.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies the relationship between sustainability, corporate social responsibility, and value co-creation based on qualitative research data gathered from two embedded case studies. The first case study in a large mining company operating in New Zealand and the second case study is based on the New Zealand Merino Company.

Findings

Findings of this research suggest that sustainability is built with the participation of many interconnected entities, that is, suppliers, manufacturers, retailers, or more generally stakeholders whose actions are fostered by social responsibility that fuels the pride, trust, and consistency of the members of the value chain. Value in all forms – functional value, hedonic value, symbolic value and cost value – is a recurrent theme in this research data; however it is value co-creation, working together, living up to the values that their products and services promise that ultimately supports sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper shows how the scope of sustainability has broadened from environmental matters to include other topics such as good corporate citizenship, business relationships and the value that is created and shared, not only with shareholders, but also within a wider community of stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Sergio Biggemann

This paper describes a practical method to study structure and dynamics of business relationships by applying the findings that the previous two papers outline. The focus…

Abstract

This paper describes a practical method to study structure and dynamics of business relationships by applying the findings that the previous two papers outline. The focus is to provide managers with suitable tools that improve their ability to understand and manage business relationships. The paper provides templates of figures and tables, as well as instructions on how to use them to facilitate describing structure of relationships. Relationship structure is based on five multidimensional constructs composed of trust, commitment, bonds, information sharing, and distance and dynamics of relationships based on rules of meaning and action, which are called constitutive and regulative rules.

Details

Organizational Culture, Business-to-Business Relationships, and Interfirm Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-306-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Sergio Biggemann

This paper aims to report on the role of information sharing in business relationships development.

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1820

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the role of information sharing in business relationships development.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a single embedded case study research. Relationships between a large global manufacturer and supplier of imaging products and solutions and two of their major channels, also large retailers with several department stores, were studied. Semi‐structured interviews, participant observation and document reviews were utilised to gather data.

Findings

A two‐dimensional construct of information sharing comprised by mutual disclosure and multi‐contact is proposed to account for this critical attribute of business‐to‐business relationship structure. The author concludes that information sharing fosters inter‐company collaboration, potentially increasing the value that both buyer and supplier can harvest from business relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research are not generalisable to one industry or population; however, they have theoretical implications that need validation in a broader context.

Practical implications

Data from the case study suggests that it is the supplier's responsibility to open various information‐sharing channels. Customers would, depending on the levels of trust, use these channels to share valuable information.

Originality/value

Instead of looking at information sharing as an indirect method to transmit persuasive messages, information sharing is seen as a form of collaborative communication that promotes trust and supports business growth.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Sergio Biggemann

This paper reports the results of a three-year-long research on business relationships, relying on qualitative data gathered through multiple-case study research of four…

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a three-year-long research on business relationships, relying on qualitative data gathered through multiple-case study research of four focal companies operating in Australia. The industry settings are as follows: steel construction, vegetable oils trading, aluminum and steel can manufacture, and imaging solutions. The research analyzes two main aspects of relationships: structure and process. This paper deals with structure describing it by the most desired features of intercompany relationships for each focal company. The primary research data have been coded drawing on extant research into business relationships. The main outcome of this part of the research is a five construct model composed by trust, commitment, bonds, distance, and information sharing that accounts for all informants’ utterances about relationship structure.

Details

Organizational Culture, Business-to-Business Relationships, and Interfirm Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-306-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Sergio Biggemann and Francis Buttle

In this paper the authors present a theoretical framework that shows how interaction between two or more companies depends on its context of performance. Reflexivity…

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1686

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper the authors present a theoretical framework that shows how interaction between two or more companies depends on its context of performance. Reflexivity between two or more levels of context potentially leads the parties to a situation exhibiting an apparently contradictory nature: paradox. The authors study the manner in which such situations occur and are resolved.

Design/methodology/approach

The data in this paper comes from a three‐year‐long multiple case study investigation. Data was gathered from 15 different organizations through interviews, participant observation and document reviews.

Findings

Context‐bounded interaction between organizational actors can be interpreted in different, sometimes contradictory, ways, which can create paradox. Parties cannot stay in paradox for long because it may produce adverse personal and social consequences. Thus, resolution of paradox potentially causes significant changes to the structural attributes of relationships.

Practical implications

Paradox has potentially significant and destructive consequences for the quality of business‐to‐business relationships. Organizational actors who understand that paradox has been encountered can develop strategies for exiting paradox and maintaining high‐quality relationships with their partners.

Originality/value

This paper presents a novel theoretical framework that explains how business interaction can lead to paradox, the experience and resolution of which potentially makes significant changes to the structure of business relationships.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Sergio Biggemann and Francis Buttle

This paper seeks to analyse the effects that previous episodes have on business‐to‐business relationships and how these episodes can influence the parties’ responses to a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to analyse the effects that previous episodes have on business‐to‐business relationships and how these episodes can influence the parties’ responses to a particular act. This investigation uses a network approach to investigate this relational situation.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study was used based on dozens of semi‐structured interviews to explore this phenomenon. Qualitative information was gathered. In addition to interviews, review of documents and observation were also completed.

Findings

It was found that varied outcomes occurred in the relationships and are a consequence of the contexts brought to bear on the dealers’ interpretations of the act of introducing a new agreement. New dealer relationships were strengthened, while established dealer relationships may have been weakened.

Practical implications

A long‐term relationship, built through exchanging acts over time, conditions the counterpart's response to the focal company's act. This research shows that this can happen even in cases in which the relationship could be reasonably classified as Customer partnership. The dealers’ reactions suggest that different network positions were occupied by the two different types of dealers, established and new. Even though their roles in the supply chain could be deemed as identical, it appears as if the parties’ obligations and rights were different.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the importance of good business relationships.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Sergio Biggemann

Relationships are socially constructed by companies in interaction. This study explains the dynamic character of business-to-business relationships with the aid of rules…

Abstract

Relationships are socially constructed by companies in interaction. This study explains the dynamic character of business-to-business relationships with the aid of rules theory, a theory borrowed from the communications field. Two forms of rules are identified: constitutive rules guide the interpretation of the other's acts, and regulative rules guide the appropriate response to the interpreted act. Rules theory asserts that companies act as if applying these rules. Relationships provide not only the context in which the parties’ acts are performed but are also the result of such acts. Thus, relationships are potentially reshaped each time one party performs an act and the other party gives meaning to that act and reacts.

Details

Organizational Culture, Business-to-Business Relationships, and Interfirm Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-306-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Patricia R. Todd, Raj G. Javalgi and David Grossman

The aim of this paper is to focus on the determinants that impact the growth of SMEs in B-to-B markets in emerging economies. The objective is to apply the classic model…

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1136

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to focus on the determinants that impact the growth of SMEs in B-to-B markets in emerging economies. The objective is to apply the classic model of organizational ecology to examine the characteristics of growth patterns in the B-to-B environment for SMEs in emerging markets, specifically India and China. Application of the model can guide SMEs owners/managers in their effort to successfully expand internationally in turbulent markets characterized by competitive and technological intensity.

Design/methodology/approach

An overview of the basics of the organizational ecology model is presented, followed by the description of various economic drivers of B-to-B markets in India and China. The integration of the organizational ecology model and the strategic development of methods to deal with specific challenges of entering international markets are discussed. The paper concludes with managerial implications and suggestions for future research.

Findings

Businesses operating in emerging markets face many of the same roadblocks concerning efficiencies, increasing competition, and the need for capital, that are experienced by businesses throughout the world, however, they also face challenges unique to the developmental nature of the country environment. Ecological models can be used to understand the dynamics between resource utilization and growth.

Practical implications

The ecology-based view evaluates the utilization of resources with a focus on how changes in resource availability impact the international growth strategy of the B-to-B firm in India and China. These two economies represent a large business environment, generally underdeveloped with regards to taking advantage of potential resource availability.

Originality/value

While the significant economic contribution of SMEs is well understood, their business practices in emerging economies have not been extensively studied, especially in the B-to-B arena. The goal here is to stimulate the development of new insights for managing the complex relationships between the B-to-B SMEs, organizational ecology, and the international environment in emerging markets. This study extends the literature concerning factors that impact business success in important emerging markets such as India and China.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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