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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Serdar Durdyev

The study investigates the causes of project cost overruns (COs) that have been reported in the construction-management-related articles since 1985.

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Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates the causes of project cost overruns (COs) that have been reported in the construction-management-related articles since 1985.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the aim and provide recommendations to avoid project COs, 48 selected journal articles were reviewed and assessed with regard to the countries, institutions and researchers that have contributed to the subject.

Findings

The review of the articles shows that the subject has attracted a considerable attention from the researchers worldwide. However, the problem mainly occurred in developing countries and the researchers drew the attention on the resource-related, economic/financial as well as political problems. While 79 causes of COs were identified, the top ten causes of project COs, which have received the highest number of citations by the reviewed articles, were presented and discussed. These causes are: design problems and incomplete design, inaccurate estimation, poor planning, weather, poor communication, stakeholder's skill, experience and competence, financial problems/poor financial management, price fluctuations, contract management issues and ground/soil conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings have several implications, which are not only for the academic world, but also for the construction front line. For scholars, the study provides a list of project COs that the researchers in the area could benefit for their future studies. The industry practitioners could find ways to improve project cost performance by giving attention to the causative factors that are significantly affecting construction projects and investing their resources and efforts towards the most occurred ones.

Originality/value

Thus, this study provides insight into the research output on the subject and a checklist of COs, which is believed to provide a better understanding of significant areas requiring attention where steps should be taken to minimize or control factors causing COs in construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Kamilla Zhalmurziyeva, Serik Tokbolat, Serdar Durdyev, Mohamad Y. Mustafa and Ferhat Karaca

This research aims to study a broad range of sustainability aspects and develop a set of indicators with their subjective relevance to each of the sustainability dimensions that…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to study a broad range of sustainability aspects and develop a set of indicators with their subjective relevance to each of the sustainability dimensions that will help to improve the sustainability level of the water system of Nur-Sultan (Kazakhstan).

Design/methodology/approach

The broader list of indicators (which were identified through a thorough review of the literature) was assessed by water-related industry professionals and experts who were asked to assess the compliance of suggested indicators to five criteria of sustainability using a Likert scale.

Findings

It was found that the highest-ranked indicators across all five categories were mainly related to the chemical and physical quality of water, followed by availability of individual water meters as well as water supply tariffs' adjustment to users' income, and issues of ageing infrastructure. The lowest-ranked indicators among all categories were mainly related to investments into research and development, water management and awareness, feedback systems and flexibility. The least ranked indicators are seen to be more related to the scenarios when basic needs are covered and the stakeholders have extra time and resources for advancing the levels of water infrastructure sustainability.

Practical implications

The ranked and categorized indicators can be used as a powerful decision-making tool to improve the sustainability of the water system of Nur-Sultan or any other city in a developing country.

Originality/value

By conducting this study, it was aimed to address the aforementioned gap in the field in terms of running a wider scope assessment of indicators rather than looking at conventional environmental and socio-economic aspects. This provides novelty to the study, especially in the context of developing countries that need more guidance in terms of sustainable development of the water-related infrastructure.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Serdar Durdyev, Saeed Reza Mohandes, Amir Mahdiyar and Syuhaida Ismail

Homebuyers' motivation to purchase the green building (GB) is vital for the widespread adoption of greener practices and for tackling the adverse impact of the built environment…

Abstract

Purpose

Homebuyers' motivation to purchase the green building (GB) is vital for the widespread adoption of greener practices and for tackling the adverse impact of the built environment. In this regard, through the lenses of qualified and competent GB developers (GBD) and real estate agents (REAs) using judgment sampling technique, this paper aims to evaluate the factors stimulating the purchase intention of Malaysian homebuyers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the interval-valued fuzzy Delphi method (IVFDM) to identify influential factors, while the cybernetic fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (CFAHP) for prioritizing the identified factors according to their significance in nationwide promotion of GBs is utilized.

Findings

The findings, which are consistent with those reported in the literature and validated by the focus group, uncover the most prominent factors that drive the purchase intention of GB homebuyers. The results indicate that the homebuyers are familiar with the benefits of GB; however, the benefits are not sufficient to overcome the perceived “high cost” of green practices. Hence, homebuyers still seek financial incentives, which is a clear indication that financial issues are the most motivating factor.

Practical implications

Increase in informative promotion of GB is necessary, particularly among prospective homebuyers in developing countries where GB adoption is in its infancy. Frontline players (those who are responsible for wider promotion) can utilize the factors that this study found to be important to identify appropriate steps to increase prospective homebuyers' motivation for purchasing greener dwellings.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is threefold. First, review and identification of the most cited determinants that have been reported in the context of the subject. Second, this paper presents the most significant determinants in a developing country setting through the lenses of Malaysian experts in the area. Third, improvement measures could be implemented in Malaysia and other developing countries to promote the GB paradigm with an aim to make the building environment more sustainable.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Begmyrat Kulmedov and Serdar Durdyev

The aim of the present study is to assess the selected heating systems (furnace and boiler) commonly used in the dwellings of seven post-USSR (the Union of Soviet Socialist…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the present study is to assess the selected heating systems (furnace and boiler) commonly used in the dwellings of seven post-USSR (the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) countries. The systems were assessed in terms of their cost and environmental performance, with natural gas and electricity used as the main source of energy.

Design/methodology/approach

The cost-effectiveness and environmental performance of the selected heating systems that have been commonly used in the selected post-USSR countries was assessed. Current energy (natural gas and electricity) prices that are applied in those countries were used.

Findings

Results show that the furnace is the cheapest option, while natural gas is the cheapest source of energy, despite its high price in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. Both heating systems could be considered eco-friendly options, although their efficiencies need to be considered at the design stage. Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, which are the top natural gas producers, offer natural gas for the selected heating systems as both cost-effective and eco-friendly options.

Practical implications

A considerable reduction in electricity consumption and less harm to our environment can be achieved through the systems used in residential buildings in the region.

Originality/value

The outcomes of the present study offer value (in terms of cost-effective and eco-friendly options) for the end-users in the region.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Serdar Durdyev and M. Reza Hosseini

The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of studies on CPD published between 1985 and 2018.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of studies on CPD published between 1985 and 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

Before identifying common CPD, research trends were examined in terms of the number of publications in selected journals, as well as the contributions made by countries, institutions and researchers.

Findings

The findings reveal that researchers from developing countries have contributed the most to identifying the causes of CPD. A total of 149 causes of CPD were identified in a thorough review of 97 selected studies. Weather/climate conditions, poor communication, lack of coordination and conflicts between stakeholders, ineffective or improper planning, material shortages, financial problems, payment delays, equipment/plant shortage, lack of experience/qualification/competence among project stakeholders, labour shortages and poor site management were identified as the ten most common CPDs.

Originality/value

Being the first study of its type, this study provides insight into the research output related to this area and identifies a common set of CPDs, which may provide a better understanding of the key areas requiring attention where steps should be taken to minimise or control factors causing delays in construction projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2023

Kerim Koc, Serdar Durdyev, Aidana Tleuken, Omer Ekmekcioglu, Jasper Mbachu and Ferhat Karaca

Circular economy (CE) is increasingly used as a system solution framework for tackling climate change. Existing CE solutions have been found effective in other sectors but…

Abstract

Purpose

Circular economy (CE) is increasingly used as a system solution framework for tackling climate change. Existing CE solutions have been found effective in other sectors but ineffective in the construction sector (CS) due to the inability to account for unique CS dynamics that are essential for its success. With CS being one of the worst polluters, this research aimed to investigate critical success factors (CSFs) and a practical CE implementation framework for the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods research involving descriptive surveys of construction professionals in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Turkey was used to explore priority dimensions of McKinsey’s ReSOLVE (“regenerate, share, optimize, loop, virtualize and exchange”) circulatory framework, and the associated CSFs that underpin successful implementation of CE in the sector. Empirical data were analyzed using the fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (F-AHP) and the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) algorithm.

Findings

Results showed that “Optimize” and “Loop” were the most critical of the six dimensions of CE implementation framework for successful circularity transition of the CS in each case study country. Twenty-seven CSFs identified in the study were clustered into seven key action areas for successful rollout of the ReSOLVE framework, namely, legislative and documentation, financial, design, external/stakeholder, technological, internal and construction/production/waste management.

Practical implications

The study makes a unique contribution to existing knowledge by exploring ReSOLVE-based CSFs for successful CE implementation in the CS through the lenses of experienced construction practitioners and experts in developing countries. The findings are expected to provide a deeper insight into the most significant CSFs to be focused on with the limited resources available to decision-makers in the CS. The findings would also inform regulatory policy reformations aimed at facilitating greater rate of implementation of CE in the construction value chain.

Originality/value

The study – the first of its kind – established and validated a wholistic and construction-specific CE implementation framework to guide built environment professionals and policymakers in formulating a roadmap for successful CS’s transition to circularity and hopefully paving the way for improved economic, social and environmental performance of the sector.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Serdar Durdyev, Kerim Koc, Ferhat Karaca and Asli Pelin Gurgun

Reportedly, green roof (GR) makes a significant contribution towards a truly sustainable-built environment; however, its implementation is yet to hit a sufficient level in…

Abstract

Purpose

Reportedly, green roof (GR) makes a significant contribution towards a truly sustainable-built environment; however, its implementation is yet to hit a sufficient level in developing countries. Thus, this study assesses GR implementation strategies in developing countries by providing a comparative analysis through experts in Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a four-step methodological approach to achieve the research aim: literature review, focus group discussion, fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP) analysis and correlation analyses. First, a literature review followed by a focus group discussion is used to determine 18 (out of 25 initially) strategies for the selected context and these are classified into three categories: governmental and institutional support, knowledge and information and policy and regulation. Afterward, the identified GR strategies are evaluated using the FAHP with the data gathered from the experts in the countries studied. Finally, correlation analyses were used to observe the strength of agreement between the assessments of experts from the included countries.

Findings

The findings indicate that financial incentives, low-cost government loans and subsidies and tax rebates are the essential strategies for the wider adoption of GR. Evaluating the policy and regulations strategies also showed that mandatory GR policies and regulations and better enforcement of the developed GR policies are ranked as the most prominent strategies. The findings show a low level of agreement among respondents from Kazakhstan, while there is a high level of agreement between the experts in Malaysia and Turkey.

Research limitations/implications

The research contribution is twofold. First (research implication), the study identifies the strategies through a complete literature review. Second, the identified strategies are evaluated through the lenses of experts in three developing countries which are hoped to provide (practical contribution) a better understanding of the most effective strategies that require attention and enable the frontline stakeholders (particularly government authorities) to focus on them.

Originality/value

The study findings provide a good point of departure to explore the strategies for broader adoption of GRs in developing economic setting.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 July 2021

Nguyen Van Tam, Nguyen Quoc Toan, Vu Van Phong and Serdar Durdyev

This study aims to investigate the impact of primary building information modelling (BIM)-related factors, extracted from the literature on the subject, on construction project…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of primary building information modelling (BIM)-related factors, extracted from the literature on the subject, on construction project performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data collected from 134 BIM users, this study used structural equation modelling to assess the impact of these factors in five main BIM-related factor clusters.

Findings

The results of the analysis confirmed the reliability and validity of the research design and outcomes. The findings indicated that the BIM-related external factors cluster is the most influential cluster affecting construction project performance. BIM-related project factors and BIM-related technological factors also had a significant impact on project performance. These were followed by the BIM-related management factors cluster, while the BIM-related human factors cluster had a low impact on project performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study will contribute to fostering BIM adoption and implementation in the construction industry in developing countries.

Originality/value

This study has filled a crucial knowledge gap by providing information on manageable primary BIM-related factors affecting construction project performance.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Andrew Thomas Hall, Serdar Durdyev, Kerim Koc, Omer Ekmekcioglu and Laura Tupenaite

Building information modeling (BIM) is a prominent concept to digitalize data collection and analysis processes. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) account for a…

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Abstract

Purpose

Building information modeling (BIM) is a prominent concept to digitalize data collection and analysis processes. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) account for a considerable percentage of the works performed in the construction industry. The adoption rate of BIM by SMEs is still, however, not at the desired level in the New Zealand construction industry. This study aims to evaluate barriers to BIM implementation for SMEs in the New Zealand construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted four-step methodology to evaluate barriers to BIM adoption for SMEs. First, a comprehensive literature review, followed by a focus group discussion was performed to identify barriers to BIM adoption. Then, analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used to assess identified barriers. Finally, experts’ agreements (both internal and external) were ensured by consistency analysis and Kendall’s coefficient of concordance (Kendall’s W) tests.

Findings

The findings indicate that (1) interoperability between software platforms, (2) lack of government mandate on BIM usage at project level, (3) high cost of acquiring the software and licensing required to use BIM and (4) lack of client demand for adopting BIM were the most significant barriers in terms of technological, governmental, resource and cultural categories, respectively. Further investigation of the expert evaluation showed strong consistencies (each expert separately) and agreements (among experts) in each AHP matrix.

Practical implications

Primary focus should be training of local market (particularly SMEs) professionals as the shortage in qualified professionals makes the country-wide adoption challenging. The publicity in the local market can help SMEs understand how BIM is leveraged for further improvements in project performance.

Originality/value

Overall, this research not only provides a roadmap for the widespread adoption of BIM within SMEs in New Zealand through analysis of the barriers encountered but also highlights the power that policymakers hold over the mass adoption of BIM within SMEs.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Mohammed Hamza Momade, Serdar Durdyev, Dave Estrella and Syuhaida Ismail

This study reviews the extent of application of artificial intelligence (AI) tools in the construction industry.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study reviews the extent of application of artificial intelligence (AI) tools in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough literature review (based on 165 articles) was conducted using Elsevier's Scopus due to its simplicity and as it encapsulates an extensive variety of databases to identify the literature related to the scope of the present study.

Findings

The following items were extracted: type of AI tools used, the major purpose of application, the geographical location where the study was conducted and the distribution of studies in terms of the journals they are published by. Based on the review results, the disciplines the AI tools have been used for were classified into eight major areas, such as geotechnical engineering, project management, energy, hydrology, environment and transportation, while construction materials and structural engineering. ANN has been a widely used tool, while the researchers have also used other AI tools, which shows efforts of exploring other tools for better modelling abilities. There is also clear evidence of that studies are now growing from applying a single AI tool to applying hybrid ones to create a comparison and showcase which tool provides a better result in an apple-to-apple scenario.

Practical implications

The findings can be used, not only by the researchers interested in the application of AI tools in construction, but also by the industry practitioners, who are keen to further understand and explore the applications of AI tools in the field.

Originality/value

There are no studies to date which serves as the center point to learn about the different AI tools available and their level of application in different fields of AEC. The study sheds light on various studies, which have used AI in hybrid/evolutionary systems to develop effective and accurate predictive models, to offer researchers and model developers more tools to choose from.

Details

Frontiers in Engineering and Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-2499

Keywords

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