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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Serdal Temel, Anne-Laure Mention and Alp Eren Yurtseven

Embracing a large set of innovation objectives and collaborating with diverse partners have been promoted as a means to improve innovation performance. However, empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

Embracing a large set of innovation objectives and collaborating with diverse partners have been promoted as a means to improve innovation performance. However, empirical evidence on the relationships between breadth of objectives, breadth of cooperation and innovation performance is limited, particularly in the context of emerging economies. A larger number of objectives and cooperation partners inevitably increases the complexity in organizational alignment, and cooperation eventually leads to diminishing returns. This study adds to the debate on the costs and benefits of cooperation for innovation. Understanding the optimal levels of the breadth of objectives and cooperation supports managerial decision-making and productivity in the practice of cooperation for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Operationalizing breadth of innovation objectives and cooperation via the Turkish Community Innovation Survey data, self-reports reflecting 5,863 firm-level responses between 2006 and 2008 are analysed using tobit and probit models. The maximum likelihood estimator is used to find the optimal levels for breadth of objectives and cooperation.

Findings

Firms with greater breadth of innovation objectives experience higher innovation performance; those with greater breadth of cooperation also experience higher innovation performance, but our results indicate the existence of optimal levels of breadth for both innovation objectives and cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

The authors extend the logic that there is no safety in numbers in cooperation for innovation. If the aim is to enhance innovation performance, managers and policymakers need to pay attention to the number of innovation objectives and the amount of cooperation pursued by firms. However, innovation success may be closely associated with a firm's dynamic capabilities and ability to mobilize its resources. Drawing on organizational learning theories, future research could explore why a lower than maximum level of cooperation may be more conducive to reaching levels of enhanced innovation performance and whether this level is influenced by cognitive processes.

Originality/value

The authors draw attention to the ideal number of innovation objectives and number of cooperating partners required to enhance innovation performance, thus contributing to the debate on the complex relationships between innovation, performance and cooperation in the unique setting of a large developing economy.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Halit Duran, Serdal Temel and Victor Scholten

Context characteristics of emerging economies differ significantly from those in developed economies. Considering this substantial difference, this study aims to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

Context characteristics of emerging economies differ significantly from those in developed economies. Considering this substantial difference, this study aims to identify the drivers and barriers for new product development (NPD) success in the context of an emerging economy by drawing on the resource-based view.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from firms in different sectors in the Aegean Region of Turkey using the Wageningen Innovation Assessment Tool. Of 189 responses, 94 fit the criteria and used for statistical analysis. The data is analyzed using a two-step procedure, namely, a confirmatory factor analysis followed by a binary logistic regression that is used to model the probability in the study of the success of NPD.

Findings

The results reveal that along with the context characteristics of an emerging economy setting, internal capabilities matter for NPD success. Based on interviews with NPD managers, it was found that, among other factors, the close relationship with local customers is key for new product success, while introducing high innovative products to the market of an emerging economy may not be appropriate due to the specific conditions of such economies.

Practical implications

This study will be useful to the managers to understand the extent to which the degree of newness of a product affects NPD success in an emerging economy setting. It also highlights the importance of securing firm resources before starting an innovation activity in this setting where resources such as financial resources, knowledge and physical resources are limited. From a policy perspective, this study provides certain insights as well. That is, government officials in emerging economies should be very careful about their informal actions that might disrupt the investment and innovation environment.

Originality/value

Emerging economies are important for large firms seeking growth. They initiate manufacturing activities and increasingly perform innovation activities in those countries. However, the conditions to innovate are different from those in developed economies. Research into the factors that drive innovation is largely in an embryonic state. This study offers NPD researchers a deeper understanding of the drivers and barriers to innovation, particularly internal ones that may affect the NPD success in an emerging economy setting, in this case, that of Turkey. The results provide suggestions for policymakers to consider during the development of new innovation policies. For practitioners, this study outlines novel combinations of internal factors that lead to NPD success.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Serdal Temel and Susanne Durst

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to name and categorize risks related to emerging technological innovations and to propose a number of countermeasures. The emphasis…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to name and categorize risks related to emerging technological innovations and to propose a number of countermeasures. The emphasis is placed on knowledge risks that are grouped under human, organizational and technological spheres and are presented from a small business perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The presented paper takes into account the prior literature and the authors’ thoughts and experiences to identify potential knowledge risks and countermeasures.

Findings

Having a better overview of possible knowledge risks that may emerge in conjunction with the adoption and application of emerging technological innovations can help small businesses to better assess these new developments and their possible upsides and downsides. The proposed risks and countermeasures can also help policymakers as well as other organizations working for or together with smaller businesses to help them maintain and even increase their competitiveness.

Practical implications

Different implications are suggested for not only managers and employees in small businesses but also other stakeholders working for or with small businesses.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first one that focuses on how small businesses can improve their decision-making regarding the adoption of new emerging technological innovation from a knowledge risk perspective.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Susanne Durst, Christoph Hinteregger, Serdal Temel and R. Baris Yesilay

The understanding of the later stage (i.e. the exploitation phase) in the new product development (NPD) process by companies from emerging markets is underdeveloped. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The understanding of the later stage (i.e. the exploitation phase) in the new product development (NPD) process by companies from emerging markets is underdeveloped. The purpose of this paper is to address this lack and, by drawing upon a data set from Turkish firms, explore how different factors affect the exploitation phase of the NPD process.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple hierarchical regression analyses were carried out on a sample of 671 Turkish firms operating in five industries (i.e. information and communication technologies, biomedical, machinery, chemical and plastic, and food and beverage) in the Izmir region (Turkey) to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results reveal major differences regarding human capital, leadership, marketing capabilities, and business and institutional networks in terms of the commercialization of newly developed products in domestic and international markets.

Originality/value

By focusing on the exploitation stage, this paper extents the growing research efforts to study the NPD process of companies in emerging economies other than China by using primary data from Turkey.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Eun-Mi Lee, Serdal Temel and Cevahir Uzkurt

Internet shopping is becoming more prevalent and popular in Turkey, one of the fastest growing e-commerce markets in Eastern Europe. The growth of internet usage has…

Abstract

Purpose

Internet shopping is becoming more prevalent and popular in Turkey, one of the fastest growing e-commerce markets in Eastern Europe. The growth of internet usage has focused academic attention on the factors that drive the adoption of internet shopping. The purpose of this study is to investigate how opinion leadership and open processing innovativeness influence internet shopping behavior through the mediating variable of domain-specific innovativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected via face-to-face contact with consumers in Eskisehir. A total of 275 usable responses were obtained.

Findings

The results reveal that opinion leadership induces positive internet shopping behavior through domain-specific innovativeness, whereas open processing innovativeness has no significant impact.

Originality/value

The study makes an important contribution by offering theoretical and managerial implications for internet marketers.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2013

Serdal Temel and Brian Glassman

Companies in developed countries have clearly benefited from university-industry collaborations but emerging nations around the world have a different series of challenges…

Abstract

Companies in developed countries have clearly benefited from university-industry collaborations but emerging nations around the world have a different series of challenges and barriers to overcome in establishing strong university-industry collaborations. The following article discusses the barrier that 202 Turkish companies experienced while collaborating with local universities. Establishing trust and awareness were found to be major barriers preventing deep research collaborations. Interestingly, Turkish companies did take great advantage of universities' technical infrastructures being their equipment and laboratory facilities to test products, conduct research, and run experiments without formally collaborating, the authors term this "light collaboration." To accelerate university-industry collaborations in Turkey and other emerging nations a simple three tiered model is presented herein and is composed of: building awareness, building trust and exposure, and transitioning companies to full research projects. It is hoped that the ideas proposed herein will positively generate new concepts for grants and programs for emerging countries to support their university-industry innovation collaborations efforts.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Dilek Demirhan, Serdal Temel and Susanne Durst

The aim of this chapter is to present and analyze the role of public entrepreneurship programs in fostering technology-based entrepreneurship in Turkey. More precisely…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to present and analyze the role of public entrepreneurship programs in fostering technology-based entrepreneurship in Turkey. More precisely, the authors of the chapter present and analyze the public policy programs aimed at entrepreneurship that have been put into action in Turkey in the last 20 years. The particular focus is on the type of programs that have been introduced, what have they achieved so far, and their contribution to the economy in terms of technology-based entrepreneurship. Together with the statistics about the output of the programs, data are also provided by a series of interviews with technology-based entrepreneurs to develop a deeper understanding of the effectiveness of those programs. Recommendations and ideas are derived from the research to improve these programs.

Details

Societal Entrepreneurship and Competitiveness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-471-7

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Vanessa Ratten and Leo-Paul Dana

This book provides an opportunity to explore the societal effects of entrepreneurship and its result on competitiveness. Over the last decade society has changed as the…

Abstract

This book provides an opportunity to explore the societal effects of entrepreneurship and its result on competitiveness. Over the last decade society has changed as the consequence of demographic shifts and increased usage of information communications technology. This has influenced the type of entrepreneurship individuals and firms to engage in and the focus of their businesses. Despite the importance of society to the speed and rate of entrepreneurship, little research exists that specifically examines societal entrepreneurship and competitiveness. This book aims at narrowing this research gap by discussing the interface between society and entrepreneurship. The core theme emerging from the chapters in this book is that the context of entrepreneurship is dependent on societal perceptions.

Details

Societal Entrepreneurship and Competitiveness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-471-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2012

Brian Glassman and Brett Trusko

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Abstract

Details

Societal Entrepreneurship and Competitiveness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-471-7

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