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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2017

Tania Yordanova Todorova, Serap Kurbanoglu, Joumana Boustany, Güleda Dogan, Laura Saunders, Aleksandra Horvat, Ana Lúcia Terra, Ane Landøy, Angela Repanovici, Chris Morrison, Egbert J. Sanchez Vanderkast, Jane Secker, Jurgita Rudzioniene, Terttu Kortelainen and Tibor Koltay

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a multinational survey on copyright literacy of specialists from libraries and other cultural institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a multinational survey on copyright literacy of specialists from libraries and other cultural institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a multinational survey of copyright literacy competencies of Library and Information Science (LIS) professionals and those who work in the cultural heritage sector (archives and museums), conducted in 13 countries, namely Bulgaria (BG), Croatia (CR), Finland (FI), France (FR), Hungary (HU), Lithuania (LT), Mexico (MX), Norway (NO), Portugal (PT), Romania (RO), Turkey (TR), UK and USA in the period July 2013-March 2015. An online survey instrument was developed in order to collect data from professionals regarding their familiarity with, knowledge and awareness of, and opinions on copyright-related issues.

Findings

Findings of this study highlight gaps in existing knowledge of copyright, and information about the level of copyright literacy of LIS and cultural sector professionals. Also attitudes toward copyright learning content in academic education and continuing professional development training programs are investigated.

Originality/value

This study aimed to address a gap in the literature by encompassing specialists from the cultural institutions in an international comparative context. The paper offers guidance for further understanding of copyright in a wider framework of digital and information literacy; and for the implementation of copyright policy, and the establishment of copyright advisor positions in cultural institutions. The recommendations support a revision of academic and continuing education programs learning curriculum and methods.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Diane Mizrachi, Alicia M. Salaz, Serap Kurbanoglu and Joumana Boustany

This paper presents the complete findings from the Academic Reading Format International Study (ARFIS), the world's largest study of tertiary students' format preferences…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the complete findings from the Academic Reading Format International Study (ARFIS), the world's largest study of tertiary students' format preferences and behaviors. The analysis of ARFIS proceeded in two stages. This paper reveals results from the second stage for the first time and compares them with the earlier results. The authors then present and discuss the results from the combined datasets of 21,266 students in 33 countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 44 members in the ARFIS research team distributed an online survey composed of 22 Likert-style, multiple choice and open-ended questions to tertiary students on their format preferences and behaviors. Inferential statistical analysis was used on participant responses, and descriptive statistics analysis was used on the combined amalgamated dataset.

Findings

Majorities of students in all countries consistently show preference for reading their academic texts in print. However, variations of preferences do occur between countries. Overall, the language of a reading does not affect reading format preferences, but national scores on this question are greatly diverse.

Originality/value

ARFIS is the largest study of its kind created through a collaboration of researchers in countries on six continents, collecting data in more than 20 languages. The sample size, rigorous statistical analysis and consistency of results strengthen the reliability of the findings. Analysis of the first dataset has received widespread recognition, but this paper is the first to publish the second dataset and the complete amalgamated results.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

S. Serap Kurbanoglu, Buket Akkoyunlu and Aysun Umay

The main aim of this paper is to describe the development of a scale designed to measure self‐efficacy for information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this paper is to describe the development of a scale designed to measure self‐efficacy for information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Cronbach's alpha, item analysis and item discrimination indices, principal component analysis, varimax rotation, and discriminant validity were used to measure reliability and validity of the scale. A 28‐item refined version of the scale was found highly reliable and of reasonable length.

Findings

Further refinement based on principal component analysis indicated three major components, which allow approaching information literacy skills regarding to their complexity levels.

Originality/value

The information literacy self‐efficacy scale is recommended to identify individuals with low self‐efficacy beliefs, which may be a significantly limiting factor for them to explore their information literacy skills.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 62 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

S. Serap Kurbanoglu

This paper is primarily concerned with self‐efficacy in the context of information literacy. The focus is first on the concept of self‐efficacy, followed by attainment of…

Abstract

This paper is primarily concerned with self‐efficacy in the context of information literacy. The focus is first on the concept of self‐efficacy, followed by attainment of self‐efficacy beliefs. Finally, findings of the research, the aim of which was to explore students’ (who enrolled in the Department of Information Management, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey) perceived self‐efficacy for information and computer literacy, are scrutinized. Results of the research indicate no significant year‐to‐year changes, although the students have a positive perceived self‐efficacy for information literacy. Students’ self‐efficacy beliefs regarding information literacy and computers are correlated.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Peter Stokes and Christine Urquhart

The aim of this paper is to profile the information seeking behaviour of nursing students, according to learning style, personality and self‐efficacy in information…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to profile the information seeking behaviour of nursing students, according to learning style, personality and self‐efficacy in information literacy. Such profiles should help students to reflect on their information seeking, and should help librarians in designing information literacy programmes that are targeted to student needs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire using existing validated scales for learning styles, personality, and information literacy self‐efficacy was developed. The information seeking portion was based on an information behaviour model with core processes (opening, orientation and consolidation) and corresponding micro‐processes. The questionnaire was administered to nursing students (n=261, response rate 74 per cent, 194/261) at one UK university.

Findings

Neither information literacy self‐efficacy, nor learning style on their own appeared to change as students progressed. There is a significant association between learning style and self‐efficacy. There appears to be some associations between personality and learning style, and between personality, learning style and preferred information seeking processes. Odds ratios analyses were used to help in preliminary development of profiles. Students with a higher degree of confidence about their information literacy are more likely to: think about their search; work out strategies; and build and adapt their searches. Deep learners take a broad, exploratory approach to searching and score highest for the openness personality trait; whilst strategic learners think about their search, adapt as they progress and score highest for conscientiousness and emotional stability. Surface learners do less planning. Additionally, personality traits (which are essentially stable over time) are positively or negatively associated with various aspects of information seeking.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size limits the extent of statistical analyses and possible generalizations. The planned qualitative research may help in confirmation of the information seeking profiles.

Originality/value

The research extends existing research evidence on the impact of personality and learning style on student information behaviour by including an information literacy scale and information seeking micro‐processes.

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