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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Robert Jack, Sharif As-Saber and Ron Edwards

Perceived differences in the composition of goods and services forms the basis of a significant degree of analysis of the firm internationalisation process. In particular…

Abstract

Purpose

Perceived differences in the composition of goods and services forms the basis of a significant degree of analysis of the firm internationalisation process. In particular, product inseparability is highlighted as a distinguishing feature of service offerings and purports to explain the different approaches to internationalisation strategy adopted by service firms. The research, however, proposes that the division of goods and services into distinct products is outmoded. Rather, it is important to understand the extent of service components that embody, or are embedded in, a product offering. The authors argue that this “service embeddedness” influences the process by which a firm internationalises. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on ten case studies of Australian international firms, this paper examines the impact of service embeddedness on a firm’s internationalisation process.

Findings

The research underlines that firms approach internationalisation with a view of ensuring that the various activities that combine to form their product offering are available to their international clients.

Research limitations/implications

From an academic perspective, a dichotomous approach to products (good or service) underestimates the role that embedded services have on a firm’s internationalisation process. The research, therefore, has implications for researchers and practitioners as it highlights the importance of delivering products internationally that comprise of both good and embedded service components.

Originality/value

The research develops a deeper understanding of the extent and nature of separability within individual product categories from international production and operations perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Don DeVoretz and Florin Vadean

This chapter analyses the effect of cultural differences among ethnic groups on the remittance behaviour of native and immigrant households in Canada. In contrast to the…

Abstract

This chapter analyses the effect of cultural differences among ethnic groups on the remittance behaviour of native and immigrant households in Canada. In contrast to the New Economic of Labour Migration (NELM) literature that examines remittance motivation in the framework of extended family agreements, we embed remittances in a formal demand system, suggesting that they represent expenditures on social relations with relatives and/or friends and contribute to membership in social/religious organisations respectively. The results indicate strong ethnic group cultural differences in the remittance behaviour of recent Asian immigrant households and highlight the importance of differentiating with respect to cultural background when analysing the determinants of remittances.

Details

Migration and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-153-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2017

James A. Pinder, Rob Schmidt, Simon A. Austin, Alistair Gibb and Jim Saker

Despite being a common term in the literature, there is little agreement about what the word “adaptability” means in the context of the built environment and very little…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite being a common term in the literature, there is little agreement about what the word “adaptability” means in the context of the built environment and very little evidence regarding practitioners’ understanding of adaptability. This paper aims to examine what practitioners in the building industry mean when they talk about “adaptability”.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative approach, involving 82 unstructured face-to-face interviews with practitioners from a range of professional disciplines in the construction industry, including architects, engineers, facilities managers, property agents and planners. The interview transcripts were coded inductively to identify themes in the qualitative data.

Findings

The interview data revealed a wide range of perspectives on adaptability, particularly regarding terminology, the meanings practitioners associate with adaptability and the way in which these meanings are communicated to others in the industry. The applied meaning of adaptability varied depending on context.

Practical implications

Conflicting language, and different interpretations of adaptability, is a potential barrier to the development of adaptable buildings. A clearer articulation of the meaning of adaptability (particularly by clients) during briefing and design could give rise to a more appropriate level of adaptability in the built environment.

Originality/value

This study has addressed a gap in the existing literature by foregrounding the voices of industry practitioners and exploring their (sometimes very different) interpretations of adaptability in buildings.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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