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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Gábor Harsányi

Abstract

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Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Robert A. Pinnock

This paper gives a brief overview of requirements within the aerospace market sector for which optical sensors are of potential benefit, and goes on to describe sensors

Abstract

This paper gives a brief overview of requirements within the aerospace market sector for which optical sensors are of potential benefit, and goes on to describe sensors currently under development at Lucas Electrical and Electronic Systems which are primarily intended to meet some of these requirements. These sensors, based on the combination of silicon micromachining and optical sensing technologies, are sufficiently robust to provide the capability of directly measuring on‐engine parameters such as pressure and temperature. In association with FADEC‐mounted interface units, to which the sensor heads are coupled via optical fibre links, the sensors have the potential to provide measurement data for a number of aero‐engine control requirements.

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Sensor Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Abstract

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Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jon Rigelsford

Abstract

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Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Yaser Javed, Mohtashim Mansoor and Irtiza Ali Shah

Pressure, being one of the key variables investigated in scientific and engineering research, requires critical and accurate measurement techniques. With the advancements…

Abstract

Purpose

Pressure, being one of the key variables investigated in scientific and engineering research, requires critical and accurate measurement techniques. With the advancements in materials and machining technologies, there is a large leap in the measurement techniques including the development of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors. These sensors are one to two orders smaller in magnitude than traditional sensors and combine electrical and mechanical components that are fabricated using integrated circuit batch-processing technologies. MEMS are finding enormous applications in many industrial fields ranging from medical to automotive, communication to electronics, chemical to aviation and many more with a potential market of billions of dollars. MEMS pressure sensors are now widely used devices owing to their intrinsic properties of small size, light weight, low cost, ease of batch fabrication and integration with an electronic circuit. This paper aims to identify and analyze the common pressure sensing techniques and discuss their uses and advantages. As per our understanding, usage of MEMS pressure sensors in the aerospace industry is quite limited due to cost constraints and indirect measurement approaches owing to the inability to locate sensors in harsh environments. The purpose of this study is to summarize the published literature for application of MEMS pressure sensors in the said field. Five broad application areas have been investigated including: propulsion/turbomachinery applications, turbulent flow diagnosis, experimentalaerodynamics, micro-flow control and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)/micro aerial vehicle (MAV) applications.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of the paper deals with an introduction to MEMS pressure sensors and mathematical relations for its fabrication. The second part covers pressure sensing principles followed by the application of MEMS pressure sensors in five major fields of aerospace industry.

Findings

In this paper, various pressure sensing principles in MEMS and applications of MEMS technology in the aerospace industry have been reviewed. Five application fields have been investigated including: Propulsion/Turbomachinery applications, turbulent flow diagnosis, experimental aerodynamics, micro-flow control and UAV/MAV applications. Applications of MEMS sensors in the aerospace industry are quite limited due to requirements of very high accuracy, high reliability and harsh environment survivability. However, the potential for growth of this technology is foreseen due to inherent features of MEMS sensors’ being light weight, low cost, ease of batch fabrication and capability of integration with electric circuits. All these advantages are very relevant to the aerospace industry. This work is an endeavor to present a comprehensive review of such MEMS pressure sensors, which are used in the aerospace industry and have been reported in recent literature.

Originality/value

As per the author’s understanding, usage of MEMS pressure sensors in the aerospace industry is quite limited due to cost constraints and indirect measurement approaches owing to the inability to locate sensors in harsh environments. Present work is a prime effort in summarizing the published literature for application of MEMS pressure sensors in the said field. Five broad application areas have been investigated including: propulsion/turbomachinery applications, turbulent flow diagnosis, experimental aerodynamics, micro-flow control and UAV/MAV applications.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Martin Smith

An investigation has been carried out by Quo‐Tec Limited, on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry's Advanced Sensors Technology Transfer Programme, to determine…

Abstract

An investigation has been carried out by Quo‐Tec Limited, on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry's Advanced Sensors Technology Transfer Programme, to determine the opportunities which exist in the UK transportation industries for advanced sensors. The study was concerned particularly with the identification of new business opportunities for UK Small and Medium‐sized Enterprises (SMEs). The study's boundaries were defined as the automotive, aerospace, rail and marine transportation sectors and the advanced sensor technologies of optical fibres and solid state. Piezoelectric, capacitive, inductive magnetoresistive, thin film, thick film and micromachined silicon devices were all included in the term solid state. These were highlighted because of the proven strength of UK research in many of these areas and yet, in many cases, a current lack of significant UK commercial exploitation. Through literature reviews, extensive telephone interviews and face‐to‐face discussions with key individuals in over 90 transportation companies, sensor companies and research institutions, a similar number of sensor requirements were identified. From this number, those requirements best addressed by optical or solid state sensor technology were selected. A criterion applied in the selection was that the need could be addressed by a UK SME (either alone or in collaboration) with a reasonable expectation that a sensor could be commercially available within five years. Preferably, proven technology should be available — the job of a sensor company is to develop the technology into a commercial product, not to do the fundamental research work to prove the technology itself. This article comprises some “prime” opportunities, thus identified, applicable to the automotive industry.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Sathies T., Senthil P. and Anoop M.S.

Fabrication of customized products in low volume through conventional manufacturing incurs a high cost, longer processing time and huge material waste. Hence, the concept…

Abstract

Purpose

Fabrication of customized products in low volume through conventional manufacturing incurs a high cost, longer processing time and huge material waste. Hence, the concept of additive manufacturing (AM) comes into existence and fused deposition modelling (FDM), is at the forefront of researches related to polymer-based additive manufacturing. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the research works carried on the applications of FDM.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present paper, an extensive review has been performed related to major application areas (such as a sensor, shielding, scaffolding, drug delivery devices, microfluidic devices, rapid tooling, four-dimensional printing, automotive and aerospace, prosthetics and orthosis, fashion and architecture) where FDM has been tested. Finally, a roadmap for future research work in the FDM application has been discussed. As an example for future research scope, a case study on the usage of FDM printed ABS-carbon black composite for solvent sensing is demonstrated.

Findings

The printability of composite filament through FDM enhanced its application range. Sensors developed using FDM incurs a low cost and produces a result comparable to those conventional techniques. EMI shielding manufactured by FDM is light and non-oxidative. Biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds of complex shapes are possible to manufacture by FDM. Further, FDM enables the fabrication of on-demand and customized prosthetics and orthosis. Tooling time and cost involved in the manufacturing of low volume customized products are reduced by FDM based rapid tooling technique. Results of the solvent sensing case study indicate that three-dimensional printed conductive polymer composites can sense different solvents. The sensors with a lower thickness (0.6 mm) exhibit better sensitivity.

Originality/value

This paper outlines the capabilities of FDM and provides information to the user about the different applications possible with FDM.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Peter Adrian and Emmanuel Vella

Experts claim over 50% of sensor applications are currently served by silicon‐sensor technology.

Abstract

Experts claim over 50% of sensor applications are currently served by silicon‐sensor technology.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Brian Rooks

To review presentations on assembly and joining given at a seminar, “The changing face of robotics: inside and outside the factory”, organised by the UK Institution of…

Abstract

Purpose

To review presentations on assembly and joining given at a seminar, “The changing face of robotics: inside and outside the factory”, organised by the UK Institution of Electrical Engineers.

Design/methodology/approach

Details are given of three presentations. The first is by Dr Phil Webb of the University of Nottingham, who described a project to develop a flexible robotic cell capable of riveting and assembling aero‐structure components, in which a new method of “simulation‐based control” evolved. In the second, Pearl Agjakwa of Nottingham University and Craig Johnson of Rolls Royce talked about shape metal deposition, a process by which layers of weld are deposited by robot to form complex aerospace components with minimal tooling and short lead times. The final presentation was by Dr Wolfgang Kölbl of Meta Vision Systems on laser vision robot guidance. Applications in automotive and a new cross vision sensor were described, the latter being applicable to hole location such as for drilling and riveting.

Findings

Robotics inside the factory is extending into new areas of assembly and fastening and is now finding applications in the aerospace industry and not just in automotive.

Originality/value

Provides a review of some new assembly‐related process developments in robotics.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Tanyong Wei, Qiulin Tan, Tao Luo, Guozhu Wu, Shun Tang, Dan-Dan Shen, Chen Li and Jijun Xiong

The purpose of this paper is to propose a pressure-, temperature- and acceleration-sensitive structure-integrated inductor-capacitor (LC) resonant ceramic sensor to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a pressure-, temperature- and acceleration-sensitive structure-integrated inductor-capacitor (LC) resonant ceramic sensor to fulfill the measurement of multi-parameters, such as the measurement of pressure, temperature and acceleration, simultaneously in automotive, aerospace and aeronautics industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The ceramic-based multi-parameter sensor was composed of three LC tanks, which have their resonant frequencies sensitive to pressure, temperature and acceleration separately. Two aspects from the specific sensitive structure design to the multiple signals reading technology are considered in designing the multi-parameter ceramic sensor. Theoretical analysis and ANSYS simulation are used in designing the sensitive structure, and MATLAB simulation and experiment are conducted to verify the feasibility of non-coverage of multi-readout signals.

Findings

It is found that if the parameters of sensitive structure and layout of the LC tanks integrated into the sensor are proper, the implementation of a multi-parameter sensor could be feasible.

Practical implications

The ceramic sensor proposed in the paper can measure pressure, temperature and acceleration simultaneously in harsh environments.

Originality/value

The paper creatively proposes a pressure-, temperature- and acceleration-sensitive structure-integrated LC resonant ceramic sensor for harsh environments and verifies the feasibility of the sensor from sensitive structure design to multiple-signal reading.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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