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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Fawaz Baddar ALHussan, Faten Baddar AL-Husan and Lulu Alhesan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of senior managers in managing intra-and inter-organizational relationships with key customers and the factors that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of senior managers in managing intra-and inter-organizational relationships with key customers and the factors that influence such involvement in a novel context in the Arab Middle East region.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative research design was used in which 68 face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted in Jordan with endogenous and Western firms.

Findings

Top/senior managers play a significant role in Arab business relationships and in creating value for the firms. Their involvement in key accounts is imperative at all levels – strategic, operational, and relational – mainly due to cultural and institutional factors that are unique to the Arab context.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to operations in one emerging country situated in a novel setting in one particular region of the world, which is the Middle East.

Practical implications

Arab senior managers’ participation is imperative and should continue with their relatively intense involvement with key accounts. For foreign investors operating in that part of the world, it is highly recommended that senior management have a more a hands-on approach when dealing with the Arab key customer and to focus more on the relational aspect of key account management than on the organizational aspect.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the very limited number of studies on senior management involvement in key account management, making a theoretical and practical contribution and adding insight on how to manage the relationship with the Arab key customer.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Burcu Felekoglu, Serdar S. Durmusoglu, Anja M. Maier and James Moultrie

This study examines how technical drivers as well as social drivers influence organic communication and top management involvement (TMI) in new product development (NPD…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how technical drivers as well as social drivers influence organic communication and top management involvement (TMI) in new product development (NPD) projects. Technical drivers are of strategic importance and product innovativeness and social drivers are of intrinsic and extrinsic relevance. Organic communication is defined as continuous, bidirectional and informal communication between top management and the NPD teams. Further, arguing that TMI must be studied as a multifaceted construct, it is conceptualized to occur as guidance, active motivation and providing resources and creating a tolerant climate. Subsequently, the effect of TMI and organic communication on NPD performance is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set, collected via surveys from top managers and project managers involved in 86 NPD projects in 85 firms, is analyzed using PLS structural equation modeling.

Findings

The authors show that the strategic importance of the project has a positive influence on TMI through active motivation, providing resources and creating a tolerant climate for innovation, but does not have an effect on guidance. Results also show that active motivation and organic communication improve budget and schedule adherence, whereas providing guidance and stimulating a tolerant climate have detrimental effects. In summary, the results show that only active motivation enhances all types of performance while stimulating a tolerant climate appears to have the opposite effect. The results revealed that organic communication between top management and the NPD team has a strong positive effect on all elements of TMI (providing guidance, actively motivating the NPD team, providing resources and creating a tolerant climate). In other words, when top management communicates with the NPD team throughout the project in an informal way and listens to them in addition to engaging in a one-way communication, they are more likely to be seen by the team as being deeply involved in the project.

Practical implications

Executives must walk a managerial tightrope to actively motivate and to assist in providing resources, yet they must not be overbearing with direct guidance and must limit their tolerance for failures.

Originality/value

Involvement of key organizational actors such as top management and the link to project performance has attracted significant attention in research. However, nuanced empirical insights into the dyad of top management and project teams has so far been absent. The study’s findings detail the effect of technical and social drivers of top management involvement in new product development projects. Most notably, (1) the effect of motivation and stimulating a tolerant climate on performance, and (2) the effect of organic communication on top management involvement. Moreover, this study is unique in that it empirically examines TMI from both top management and team perspectives.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Judith Gill

Analyses a communication exercise within a case study company. The exercise is in preparation for the implementation of a new element of the company remuneration package…

1998

Abstract

Analyses a communication exercise within a case study company. The exercise is in preparation for the implementation of a new element of the company remuneration package which was to be based on a central philosophy of employee involvement and team problem solving. The communication programme took place over a six‐month period, and the research was conducted three months into this timescale and followed up two months after the introduction of the new payment scheme. Explicit information was conveyed downwards by senior management, and also employees were invited to contribute their ideas to the new scheme. Employees were wary and appeared to distort information based on their experiences of recent company history, their perception of the “trust” relationship between themselves and senior management, and events which took place during the exercise. The workforce appeared not to want to take ownership of the new element of the remuneration package until experience had given them an indication of a positive result. Ultimately, the communication exercise was assisting in the creation and development of a new form of shared organizational language.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Viraiyan Teeroovengadum, Robin Nunkoo and Humaira Dulloo

This study analyses the determinants of an effective performance management system (PMS) in the public sector of Mauritius. It develops a theoretical model that has its…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses the determinants of an effective performance management system (PMS) in the public sector of Mauritius. It develops a theoretical model that has its roots in the resource-based theory and the institutional theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a quantitative approach, making use of a structured questionnaire to collect data from 158 public sector organisations. Both email and postal methods were used for data collection. A hierarchical regression analysis is used to assess the effect of the organisational factors on PMS effectiveness, while controlling for a number of organisational profile variables.

Findings

Results indicate that PMS is only moderately effective. Managers’ involvement, senior management involvement and performance feedback are significant predictors of PMSs effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of the study may have limited applicability to developed and industrialised countries and even developing countries that have a different public sector culture to that of Mauritius.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that the effectiveness of PMSs is strongly reliant on the involvement of senior management. Accordingly, public sector managers should ensure that they are fully committed and engaged in performance management tasks.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the limited research on the effectiveness of PMSs in developing countries that have a different bureaucratic and performance culture to that of developed nations.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Stanley Kam Sing Wong

The purpose of the current study is to investigate the role of management involvement in innovation and its relationships with organizational, technical and marketing…

3909

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to investigate the role of management involvement in innovation and its relationships with organizational, technical and marketing innovations. Organizational innovation, which features both administrative and human capital innovation, is introduced as the intermediate construct to test its indirect effects on the influences of management involvement on technical and marketing innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 196 respondents to an online questionnaire that was sent to 2,500 potential participants randomly selected from electronics manufacturing firms across China. Structural equation model using AMOS 18 was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The findings reveal that management involvement has a positive and significant impact on all dimensions of innovation featured. It is also found that organizational innovation has a mediating effect on the association between management involvement and technical innovation, though no such effect can be found in the relationship between management involvement and marketing innovation.

Research limitations/implications

Since the study is quantitative using data emanating from the electronics manufacturing industry in China, further empirical study would be useful to verify and complement the results in other industries and other countries.

Practical implications

The findings show that management involvement appears to exert permeating impacts on all strata of innovation, presenting a reminder to practitioners and researchers that clear senior management direction, endorsement and support are essential to innovation pursuits.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the body of knowledge relating to innovation and innovation decisions. By investigating the interrelationships between management involvement and the various dimensions of innovation featured, the study identifies and charts the casual chains that can be used to guide innovation decisions.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Chris Bart and Nick Bontis

A relationship between board/managementinvolvement” and “awareness” with organizational mission and their link to “employee commitment” and “organizational performance”…

2935

Abstract

A relationship between board/managementinvolvement” and “awareness” with organizational mission and their link to “employee commitment” and “organizational performance” was modeled by drawing on previous research. The model was tested with data from 339 large Canadian and US organizations. It was determined that “mission awareness” on the part of both the board and senior management is an important consideration in the determination of employees' commitment to the mission. However, the impact of board and management involvement with the mission is not identical. The results emphasize the strong and important role that the board performs when it is actively engaged in the development of the organization's mission.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

John Ward and Elizabeth M. Daniel

Organisations are increasingly using project or programme management offices (PMOs) to co‐ordinate activities across information system (IS) projects. The purpose of this…

6026

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations are increasingly using project or programme management offices (PMOs) to co‐ordinate activities across information system (IS) projects. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the presence of PMOs and their involvement in IS projects relates to project success and to senior management satisfaction with those projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an exploratory survey method to consider the relationship of both the presence of a PMO and the involvement of the PMO in five key practices that span the project life‐cycle on project success and management satisfaction.

Findings

Counter‐intuitively, it is found that the presence of a PMO reduces senior management satisfaction with IS projects and has no effect on the overall success rates of those projects. The study draws on ideas of escalation of commitment to explain this finding.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that it is more important for PMOs to be involved at the start and at the review stage of projects, rather than in the on‐going monitoring, which is where much of their current focus is.

Originality/value

This study is the first, that the authors are aware of, to identify a reduced level of management satisfaction associated with the presence of a PMO. It is also the first study to consider PMO involvement at the level of key project practices and hence to be able to suggest how to understand and address the reduced management satisfaction identified.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Damien Power

Examines the relationship between how people are managed, and the effectiveness of business to business (B2B) e‐commerce implementations. The human resource management

4728

Abstract

Examines the relationship between how people are managed, and the effectiveness of business to business (B2B) e‐commerce implementations. The human resource management practices used to test this relationship are training, employee involvement and participatory culture. A survey instrument was designed for the purpose of testing the research hypotheses based on the themes identified in the review of the literature. This survey was administered within a sample of the membership of EAN Australia. The results indicate that there is a clear link established between effective management of human resources and effective implementation of B2B e‐commerce enabling technologies. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that the development of a participative culture coupled with the involvement of employees, will be more effective than solely investing in training programs. This study has been limited to organizations operating in the Australian fast moving consumer goods sector. The results therefore need to be read in this context, and it would be useful if these hypotheses could be tested in other countries and different industry sectors. The overall impression is that the organizations that will derive the greatest benefit from the use of these technologies will be not only those that invest in training for the use of the technology. More important sources of leverage are likely to derive from involving a broad range of employees directly in implementation, while actively encouraging a culture of participation across the organization. There is a clear link established between effective management of human resources and effective implementation of B2B e‐commerce enabling technologies. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that the development of a participative culture coupled with the involvement of employees, will be more effective than solely investing in training programs.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Calvin London

This paper aims to review the levels of management commitment and involvement in four small (fewer than 500 employees) pharmaceutical companies and the nature and extent…

2634

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the levels of management commitment and involvement in four small (fewer than 500 employees) pharmaceutical companies and the nature and extent of structured programs for policy implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

In each of the companies, the comparative success of policy implementation was assessed by the extent of management commitment to the process. Assessments were based on the review of 40 attributes of a four‐part implementation cycle. A lack of a structured process, lack of support and involvement of management and the degree to which management was subsequently involved in the overall implementation were commonly observed problems. The degree of management involvement was a prominent factor in the overall success of the policy implementation.

Findings

Quality policies play an important role in the understanding of a company's operational principles and practices. The most successful policy implementation in the companies studied relied on policies being drafted internally with the cooperation of not only the nominated quality management but also the supporting non‐quality management functions. The use of a structured and predetermined implementation plan that is shared across all sectors of the company and the development of supporting systems to monitor progress were also observed to benefit employee involvement and effective policies.

Originality/value

The study of these companies and their comparative abilities to follow a structured process for quality system policies provides valuable guidance for quality practitioners facing similar processes of change within their own organizations. A structured process for implementing policies is also provided.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Tun-Chih Kou, Bruce C. Y. Lee and Chiou-Fong Wei

Most new product research for the past two decades has focussed on new product development and product innovation. Only a few product launches have been discussed in…

1523

Abstract

Purpose

Most new product research for the past two decades has focussed on new product development and product innovation. Only a few product launches have been discussed in specific fields. The purpose of this paper is to fill the literature gap regarding enhanced product launch performance by using the customer relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

From the contract manufacturer’s perspective, the authors propose that the customer relationship and senior management involvement affects lean launch execution. The customer relationship includes both cooperativeness and behavior monitoring. Studies have suggested that a lean launch exerts a direct influence on new product performance and marketing performance. We used a questionnaire to collect data to test the postulated research model and hypotheses from project, account, and purchasing managers in the high-tech manufacturing industry.

Findings

The results provided compelling evidence that the customer relationship exerts a positive effect on lean launch, which in turn exerts a positive effect on new product performance. Although lean launch execution affected marketing performance through new product performance, the direct effect on marketing performance was non-significant. Senior management involvement exerted an indirect influence on lean launch performance through cooperativeness.

Originality/value

This paper suggests and empirically tests a model to explain how contract manufacturers manage brand-customer relationship through cooperativeness and behavior monitoring, leading to higher levels of lean launch execution toward new product performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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